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BloodyIgor
04-21-2008, 10:44 PM
I loved issue 11. The wolf story and what it truned out to be is fantastic. And great art work again. Can't wait for issue 12.

Lone Ranger
04-22-2008, 12:56 PM
I have a new job 45 miles out of town, so it's hard for me to get to the comic store when they're open. I'm anxious to see #11. Are there any preview pages out there?

MadMikeyD
04-22-2008, 01:03 PM
Lone Ranger #11 Preview @ CBR (http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=preview&id=107&disp=table)

BloodyIgor
04-23-2008, 08:28 PM
I have a new job 45 miles out of town, so it's hard for me to get to the comic store when they're open. I'm anxious to see #11. Are there any preview pages out there?

I hope you can get the issue soon you are going to injoy it.

Lone Ranger
04-24-2008, 06:18 AM
I got it last night. I thought it was clever. I liked how Tonto left the guy "hanging" with the story. :rolleyes: I have to wonder what's going on with the Lone Ranger looking in on Linda like that. I didn't care for Cavendish's lanuage on the last page, but I hope this leads to a showdown in the next story arc.

BubbaShelby
04-29-2008, 09:08 PM
My introductory issue - I'm glad I jumped in - now I just need to get 1-10!

I've always loved the Lone Ranger, and am looking forward to following this title for a long time to come!

MadMikeyD
04-29-2008, 10:49 PM
Glad to have you on board. I've been following it since the beginning and have loved every issue so far. The TPB or HC of Vol. 1 (#1-6) should be fairly readily available if you want to go the trade route. The TPB/HC of Vol. 2 (#7-11) should be out late-summer/early-fall, although those issues may be easier to find than the early ones. If you go to FCBD this weekend you may want to see if they have any copies of last year's Lone Ranger/BSG flip-book, also.

BubbaShelby
04-30-2008, 02:42 PM
Thanks for the tip MadMikeyD - I'll be on the lookout for the trades most likely, as that'll be the easiest way to catch up!

Sir Real
05-07-2008, 03:44 PM
********************
*** SPOILER question ***
********************








So why didn't Tonto finish the wolf story and tell Rafael what the wolf found when returning to his den?

- Did he really "not know", like he said? Since the story was about Tonto's life (see the cover: Tonto=wolf), he would have to know how the story ends.

- Was he just being mean, since the guy was a murderer, and he wanted to hold back something from him, akin to punishment, after getting him so involved in the story and wanting to know the ending? I don't see Tonto being cruel like this.

- Was he actually being kind, in that since the guy was about to be hanged, the unfinished story would give him something to focus on, instead of his own impending death? I see this as more of a possibility, since he also said he would stay so that the guy was not alone at the end.

- Did Tonto just not want to relive the story any further, since the ending was really horrible?

I'm probably way overthinking this.

BloodyIgor
05-07-2008, 10:38 PM
Way to through a spoiler in there with out warning anyone. And I think the point of Tonto's story was fairly obvious.

Sir Real
05-07-2008, 10:58 PM
Sorry about that, but since the issue's been out for weeks now, I figured everyone who has it had already read it by now. Plus, the subject of this message is "#11". Why would someone who hadn't read issue #11 read this topic anyway? (By the way, another poster previous to me also wrote that Tonto "left the guy hanging" with the story as well.) Regardless, I've edited my previous post with a warning.

If you think the point of the story is obvious (implying you know the reason), then why don't you explain it to me? Not trying to start anything, but I don't understand why you would write that, then not follow through.

CindyR
05-08-2008, 07:14 AM
i didn't see much of a spoiler in here. everyone already knows tonto tells a story about a wolf and its obvious analogy.
cindy


********************
*** SPOILER question ***
********************


So why didn't Tonto finish the wolf story and tell Rafael what the wolf found when returning to his den?

- Did he really "not know", like he said? Since the story was about Tonto's life (see the cover: Tonto=wolf), he would have to know how the story ends.

- Was he just being mean, since the guy was a murderer, and he wanted to hold back something from him, akin to punishment, after getting him so involved in the story and wanting to know the ending? I don't see Tonto being cruel like this.

- Was he actually being kind, in that since the guy was about to be hanged, the unfinished story would give him something to focus on, instead of his own impending death? I see this as more of a possibility, since he also said he would stay so that the guy was not alone at the end.

- Did Tonto just not want to relive the story any further, since the ending was really horrible?

I'm probably way overthinking this.

Sir Real
05-08-2008, 02:48 PM
CindyR, thanks for that.

And, can you tell me what you think the reason is why he didn't finish the story? I know that the wolf story mirrors Tonto's life, but I still can't peg why he didn't tell the ending to Rafael. When people are saying "it's obvious", what exactly is "it" that is so obvious? The fact that Tonto is the wolf? (I get that.) Or the reason that he didn't finish the story to Rafael? (I don't get that.)

Is anyone else confused by the fact that Tonto says "I don't know" when asked how the story ends? Especially since the story is about his own life (since he's the wolf)? If this is obvious, then I'm completely missing it, and someone please tell me.

MadMikeyD
05-08-2008, 03:24 PM
I'm confused right there with you, buddy. I did not enjoy this issue as much as I have the others. To be honest, I didn't even make the Tonto/wolf correlation until it was pointed out. Making that connection, I'm guessing the 'wolf' found his loved ones dead. From that guess, I would now (just as I'm typing this) make the guess that Tonto did not want to relive that portion of the story. I would not call any of this obvious, and perhaps it was meant to be somewhat ambiguous. I'm still not sure exactly what happened other than Cavendish is back in Texas, and the next arc (#12-15) will hopefully bring us a showdown.

Sir Real
05-08-2008, 04:51 PM
Glad to know I'm not the only one not crystal clear on this.

When I finished reading issue 11, I closed the book (back cover facing up), thought about it for awhile, and still didn't really get it. I turned the book over to pick it up (now front cover facing up), I was going to move on to something else, and that's when I really saw the cover (half Tonto face, half wolf face), and it was only then that I realized Tonto's wolf story was his own story.

I don't have the issue in front of me, but as the wolf story is ending, when the wolf gets back to his den, doesn't the narrative say something like "the wolf, having seen the destruction of the area (I'm paraphrasing here) was all in a panic at what he might find on returning home. When he arrived, he expected something ghastly and horrible, but what he found was not at all what he was expecting."

So, the wolf expected a slaughter (since the settlers had destroyed every other part of the environment), but found "something else"? Of course, I could be mis-remembering this. I need to see the original text again, but that makes the actual discovery, whatever it was, even more cryptic.

MadMikeyD
05-08-2008, 05:36 PM
I don't have the issue in front of me, but as the wolf story is ending, when the wolf gets back to his den, doesn't the narrative say something like "the wolf, having seen the destruction of the area (I'm paraphrasing here) was all in a panic at what he might find on returning home. When he arrived, he expected something ghastly and horrible, but what he found was not at all what he was expecting."

You're right. I forgot that it said that - about NOT finding what he expected. Now I'm back to having no clue at all, besides the Tonto/wolf connection.

Lone Ranger
05-08-2008, 07:24 PM
I have to admit that I'm stumped as well. I'm brain dead from working a new job and all the planning for the Memphis Film Festival, so most anything obvious is going to get by me (just ask Mrs. Lone Ranger! I was just informed the other day that Mother's Day is this Sunday.).
The fact that the story didn't have an ending made the whole thing a waste to me. But then the whole series is full of loose ends. We had an unreasonably long wait for this issue and it only had a couple worthwhile pages in it. Now we've got to wait until August for a new book and new story arc. (sigh)

BloodyIgor
05-08-2008, 09:42 PM
i didn't see much of a spoiler in here. everyone already knows tonto tells a story about a wolf and its obvious analogy.
cindy

Look I was not trying to start any trouble. And looking back that post of mine came out cocky and for that I apologize. I don't talk on alot of message boards but the couple I do if you say something specific about a story or movie that is new a spoiler warning should be posted. I did not know where the Tonto story was going until I read it so everyone does not know.

Sir Real
05-08-2008, 11:02 PM
*** MORE SPOILER COMMENTS ***

(Igor, no real offense taken. I just thought in a message entitled "#11", those who haven't read the book yet wouldn't be reading a bunch of posts about that book. I know I wouldn't. But I see your point.)



Reading from the comic, the actual ending text of the story is this:

"And then the wolf was home. But what it found there was nothing like the memories that had sustained it during its journey. It was a nightmare from which the wolf would never wake. It was..."

So, it's clear that it wasn't good.

But wait. Then the jailer comes in, and says "Son, it's time." Then, Tonto gives us another clue with what he says next: "Die well. I will stay for it. You will not be alone." And the next page/panel show him silhouetted in darkness, in a half-wolf face (I just noticed this right now!) as he says his final words: "Neither are a given in this world, I promise you."

Neither, referring to dying well, and not being alone, are a given. He is now talking about the deaths of his family, which were not good deaths (they didn't die well, murdered by the settlers), and also, they were alone. The wolf (Tonto) was not there when his family was killed, it/he returned too late.

Did I just figure it out? I think maybe I did. Thoughts?

BubbaShelby
05-09-2008, 12:41 AM
I'm glad the discussion is going on - it's clarified it a lot for me too.

SPOILERS::::::::::::::::::::::













I didn't get that the wolf was Tonto, but it makes sense now...I thought the wolf was the Lone Ranger ...but again maybe there is a correlation. Because the wolf's story is one of vengeance (seeking out those who wronged it and wronging them in return) and "not knowing how it ended" - well, Tonto nor the Lone Ranger's fates are known in their chosen paths. And when you become a vigilante you walk a very fine line.

Maybe I'm way off - this was my first issue of this series. But I liked it, and I like that it was something that made me think. :D

CindyR
05-23-2008, 07:28 AM
Hey, dudes. I finally got this issue. not a favorite; too much unclear. I believe the writer--whose plotline rocks, IMO--is more used to writing for a dynamic visual medium rather than a static one. the art super-rocks in this issue; really amazing.
Sir Real: I disagree with your conclusion below (tho there's not enough evidence yet to say you are wrong). dying well and alone may not refer to his family; the reference at this point is pretty broad, meaning he could be making a general statement. we'll have to wait and find out.

but something more intriguing is a statement made before: "know this dead man...i once knew one of your kind. i talk to you in his stead as i no longer can to him. for he is not dead anymore. he has become something else."
my guess is that he is talking about the Ranger becoming something else. interesting, if so, that tonto cannot talk to him. (note, he refuses to tell the ranger the story later on.) and how would the ranger be like rafael? full of anger and pain, perhaps? it hints at the relationship between the men that we just aren't seeing yet.
cindy

[QUOTE=Sir Real]

Neither, referring to dying well, and not being alone, are a given. He is now talking about the deaths of his family, which were not good deaths (they didn't die well, murdered by the settlers), and also, they were alone. The wolf (Tonto) was not there when his family was killed, it/he returned too late.