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Thread: Does Dynamite still have the rights to Buck Rogers?

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    Default Does Dynamite still have the rights to Buck Rogers?

    Buck Rogers is one of my favorites. And Dynamite is doing a GREAT job with Flash Gordon right now, but we've had nothing even MENTIONED about Buck in almost 2 years now. Does DE still hold the rights to this property? I have to say, I don't think that the previous series was really what comic fans wanted, but I think if they got the right creative team and new ideas, it would be a pretty big hit for them. Does anyone know?

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    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyPSHayes View Post
    Buck Rogers is one of my favorites. And Dynamite is doing a GREAT job with Flash Gordon right now, but we've had nothing even MENTIONED about Buck in almost 2 years now. Does DE still hold the rights to this property? I have to say, I don't think that the previous series was really what comic fans wanted, but I think if they got the right creative team and new ideas, it would be a pretty big hit for them. Does anyone know?
    Hermes Press (that publishes the classic Buck Rogers strip reprint collections) is preparing a new version - by Howard Chaykin, of all people. It does seem like an odd pairing of character with creator to me, but I'll reserve judgment until I see it. I never saw Chaykin as the type of guy who was nostalgic for anything from his childhood, but I could be wrong. Or maybe he's just getting sentimental in his old age. It happened to me. But then, I didn't have to get old to be nostalgic for Buck Rogers. I've owned that classic oversized hardcover collection The Collected Works of Buck Rogers in the 25th Century since it was first published (1969).

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    http://comicsbeat.com/more-details-o...n-buck-rogers/
    Last edited by positronic; 01-01-2013 at 05:33 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by positronic View Post
    Hermes Press (that publishes the classic Buck Rogers strip reprint collections) is preparing a new version - by Howard Chaykin, of all people. It does seem like an odd pairing of character with creator to me, but I'll reserve judgment until I see it. I never saw Chaykin as the type of guy who was nostalgic for anything from his childhood, but I could be wrong. Or maybe he's just getting sentimental in his old age. It happened to me. But then, I didn't have to get old to be nostalgic for Buck Rogers. I've owned that classic oversized hardcover collection The Collected Works of Buck Rogers in the 25th Century since it was first published (1969).

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    http://comicsbeat.com/more-details-o...n-buck-rogers/
    Well, I am damn ashamed by your post, Pos. I am a HUGE Buck Rogers fan(seriously, ask anyone at Dynamite)and I have NO CLUE how this slipped by me for ALMOST HALF A YEAR!!!! Thanks for the news, and I did a bunch of digging last night and found a lot of stuff out. As for Chaykin, I've been reading comics since the early 80's when I was a kid. If there's one thing I've found out is that when it comes to him, NEVER underestimate him as a creator. There's been some things he's done that I'm not a fan of(like Black Kiss)but, I tend to enjoy his work more often than not. At least, if nothing else, it's going to be an interesting read. Thanks again, for letting me know about this. I probably would've not seen in it Previews either and missed the whole damn thing! LOL!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyPSHayes View Post
    If there's one thing I've found out is that when it comes to him, NEVER underestimate him as a creator. There's been some things he's done that I'm not a fan of(like Black Kiss)but, I tend to enjoy his work more often than not.
    I agree. But it's also possible for one man to enjoy a choice steak and a fine wine, and also Bazooka bubblegum and Lucky Charms. Chaykin usually isn't the first guy who leaps to my mind when I'm thinking about the warm-fuzzy/nostalgic/optimistic retro-future. Sure he's done some sci-fi and/or space opera but very little of it seems to fall into the category that I put Buck Rogers in. Some might say Cody Starbuck and Ironwolf, but I don't know. He did do the original Star Wars comics for Marvel, but then he's always had a "purely commercial" revenue stream to supplement his more personal projects. (The question would be: which one is this?) I'm dying for Chaykin to show me his sappy sentimentalist big-'ol-teddy-bear side though. That's one angle I don't really remember him pulling out of his bag of tricks.

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    Oh yeah, I also own DE's The Art of Howard Chaykin hardcover.

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    I'm guessing this is going to be REALLY action heavy, and I'm fine with that. But, yeah, I agree with you on your point. I'm looking forward to it very much. Even though I have something in my mind, I know it's going to be WAY different than what I'm picturing. LOL!!! Needless to say, it'll be nice to have Buck back in some capacity. The only thing that bothers me is that Hermes website is REALLY out of date. I read somewhere that they were planning around May of this year, so hopefully they can get things going. To my knowledge this is their first original series that they're putting out, so I hope they have some decent plans for it.

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    I guess what I'm trying to articulate in a roundabout way is that sometimes when you're a longtime/bigtime FAN of something, you can sense when a creator is sympatico to that pure fanboy buzz of working on a particular character, when it's a personal joy for them to get to play with something they loved growing up. You know, like something inspired these people to get into the biz, and when you're on the same wavelength as the creator is regarding the character, something magical happens for the reader. There's a joy that's infectious.

    But I always got the sense that Chaykin was more "adult", no-nonsense, less sentimental, not all gushy when it came to comics that came before. I mean, I'm sure he's a multifaceted guy, I just never sensed that "fanboy" (of anything) lurking beneath the skin.
    Last edited by positronic; 01-01-2013 at 03:44 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by positronic View Post
    I guess what I'm trying to articulate in a roundabout way is that sometimes when you're a longtime/bigtime FAN of something, you can sense when a creator is sympatico to that pure fanboy buzz of working on a particular character, when it's a personal joy for them to get to play with something they loved growing up. You know, like something inspired these people to get into the biz, and when you're on the same wavelength as the creator is regarding the character, something magical happens for the reader. There's a joy that's infectious.

    But I always got the sense that Chaykin was more "adult", no-nonsense, less sentimental, not all gushy when it came to comics that came before. I mean, I'm sure he's a multifaceted guy, I just never sensed that "fanboy" (of anything) lurking beneath the skin.
    I would totally agree on that point. Sometimes I get the vibe that he might just be a "paycheck" guy for some of the projects that he's taken. The only time I got the fanboy vibe from him was when he did the Shadow years ago. To me, that was a love letter from him to The Shadow.
    -But, sometimes, that love can REALLY hinder a creators ability. There's some books (like Image's Masters of the Universe), where the writer was SUCH a huge fan of that property, that it eventually hurt the book because he couldn't tell the stories that HE wanted to tell. Granted, that's a licensed property, but he eventually turned out a sub par book because he had all these franchise-changing stories that he wanted to tell, and the license holder wouldn't let him. Then, he basically turned the book over to a fan fic writer, and that was pretty much the end of that. It's a fine line between taking on something because you love it, and taking on a book that you think you can tell some good stories with. I hope, with Chaykin, it's the later.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JimmyPSHayes View Post
    I would totally agree on that point. Sometimes I get the vibe that he might just be a "paycheck" guy for some of the projects that he's taken. The only time I got the fanboy vibe from him was when he did the Shadow years ago. To me, that was a love letter from him to The Shadow.
    That's funny, because I've read interviews where Chaykin talked about his work on the Shadow, and he admits to no big love of the character. He remembered the radio show, but claimed never to have read any of the novels. Some of his comments were even dissing, in no uncertain terms, any Shadow fans who had anything critical to say about it. I'm sure he did his prep work, but he pretty much states outright that it was a paycheck job. And in a sense, when you think about it, Chaykin was being challenged by DC to deliver a sort of "Dark Knight Returns" for the Shadow, which he did.

    But you're absolutely right about the 'paycheck' jobs. He totally admits to that, and I certainly can't blame anyone in the industry who does it. It's a little sad sometimes, when I think about the incredibly talented people who never make the "big time" in comics, because of their sensitivities and devotion to art or philosophy. On the one hand, you admire someone who won't sell out, who sticks to their guns, even when you can't totally understand their point of view. We put them in the category of 'the eccentrics'. Famous members: Alan Moore, Steve Ditko. On the other hand, how do you balance the "art" with the craftmanship and commerce, and the need to pay the bills? There are obviously works that Chaykin does that are less commercial and more driven by personal vision. Sometimes those are the works that I like best, but sometimes not. I can't always share his headspace. Black Kiss? No thank you.

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    About those "paycheck" jobs...

    I grew up absolutely loving the work of "Big John" Buscema, on titles like Silver Surfer, Sub-Mariner, and most especially, The Avengers. I mean, sure, he did plenty of other superhero titles as well, most notably runs on Fantastic Four and Thor (but there he had to follow Jack Kirby -- and it's a tough thing to be "the replacement guy" for Jack Kirby).

    His later work from the 1970s and 1980s on titles like Tarzan, and (his personal favorite work) Conan... eh, I'm not so big a fan. And obviously there are going to be people who completely disagree with me on this. But it turns out, this it the type of work he loved. The most well-kept secret in the Marvel Bullpen (somehow they neglected to mention it on the Bullpen Bulletins page) was that John Buscema HATED working on superheroes. You could have knocked me over with a feather when I found out. I absolutely LOVED that work, thought it was brilliant. Conan was more of an acquired taste for me. They sucked me in with a Kirbyesque Barry Smith - who quickly blossomed into his own unique style. Here again, Buscema had to follow a guy who had indelibly put his stamp on the character, so... "replacement guy". Ditto for Buscema's Tarzan (following Kubert's at DC). But Buscema considered this his "element" and would have happily drawn it forever (I sense a guy who grew up loving Hal Foster's Prince Valiant...) But for me, it was Silver Surfer, Sub-Mariner, and The Avengers that really sang to me.

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