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On Trainwrecks, Realism, and the Picking of Nits...

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    innacuracies

    Hey, tonto.
    a steel-tipped longbow can pierce body armor; i have no trouble believing it can hit a gun in the right spot and stress-fracture it. Feel better?

    but i'm afraid our buddy kevin is going to have to be disappointed. the CHAPTER of Bart may be closed, but Bart himself is in a hospital somewhere in traction dictating telegrams. Good example of John surviving possibly worse injuries.
    I agree with Kevin about the time passage not being clear in this story, tho; just not sure how to build it into the segue without using up precious story space.
    Cindy

    Originally posted by tonto
    OK I guess arrows fired from self bows breaking guns is plausable. there are a lot of inaccuracies and "ridiculous" stuff going on in LR. Which is fine for me because I'm just as inclined to believe superman flies because he wears a red cape that simple or at least it shouldn't be scientifically or aerodynamically explained. its all fiction. If you can't believe that a man fully concious can survive the train wreck there is no reason to believe that John could survive the ambush even with Tonto's help.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    outrageousley ridiculous

    OK I guess arrows fired from self bows breaking guns is plausable. there are a lot of inaccuracies and "ridiculous" stuff going on in LR. Which is fine for me because I'm just as inclined to believe superman flies because he wears a red cape that simple or at least it shouldn't be scientifically or aerodynamically explained. its all fiction. If you can't believe that a man fully concious can survive the train wreck there is no reason to believe that John could survive the ambush even with Tonto's help.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by CindyR
    Heck, i wasn't going to go thru the trouble, but i re-read some of Dave Holland's book "From out of the past: A pictorial history of the lone ranger." (And please no one tell my husband i haven't put it on ebay after i planned to like 6 months ago. {sigh})

    on the word 'kemo sabay.' here's what it says:

    Story Number Three is irrefutable.
    you know that boys camp that [series writer/director who hired Striker] james jewell's father-in-law ran on mullet lake [northern michigan]? Guess what it's name was. "Kee-mo Sahbee." that's even the way they spelled it when it was named that back in 1915, 18 years before The Lone Ranger went on the air. and that's where james jewell got 'kemo sabe." he was the one to put it into the scrpts (where it was spelled "kemo sabay," incidentally.)
    Brace Beemer liked to tell people it meant "faithful friend" but Jewell insisted that it only meant 'trusty scout.' "that's the only thing it has ever meant," he told Rothel, "or ever will mean." Period, by God. (Holland. 1987. p. 155.)

    quick-someone tell the comic writers!
    CindyR
    Crossposted on ezboard

    Yes, please. I'd like just a tad more accuracy on this subject.

    The only things I'd change in this book really are:

    1. Give us a time notation so we can see how much time passes between panels, ok?

    2. Kemo-Sabe = trusty scout.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Bart's entire conversation with Tonto and then with Lone Ranger are to the effect of him expecting to die. especially his conversation with the ranger. "I'm ready." is a fatalistic approach, and he had expected to have a showdown before he left the ranch.

    Looking at his beat up body, I honestly do not see him surviving. Not only that but didn't they say in the pod cast that issue #6 was bringing the Black Bart chapter to a close? That to me says Black Bart had made arrangements to send that telegram before heading out to the showdown. Either that or Tonto or Ranger sent that telegram to make BC think that Bart was still alive.

    If Black Bart did live, then, again, I will have very little respect for how this story turned out. We're talking about a cold blooded murderer who seems to be able to track anyone down anywhere - a person that dangerous should've died or been turned into the authorities. His leg is drawn as if it's broken in two (the way it's twisted with the metal I see his leg doing a 60 degree angle below the knee, as well as being twisted where it can't twist), and he's out in the middle of nowhere. For him to survive that wreck, profuse bleeding, and make it to send the telegram in what appears to be a short amount of time out in the middle of the wilderness would be outrageously ridiculous.

    Bart's gotta be dead or had to have prepared that gram before the duel.
    Last edited by Kevin; 06-14-2007, 04:01 PM.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Bart's arrest

    Hmmmm. I suppose they could be using bart as bait, tho i don't see it yet. especially since bart pretty much divorced himself from butch and disappered.

    one other possibility: i can't find a shred of evidence against bart anywhere. no one saw him kill anyone, he didn't leave smoking identifiable guns at the scene of the crime, and there's no one whe would testify (like butch) as to his involvement. turning him in wouldn't have done any good anyway.
    not that it looks like he's ever going to be able to walk again much less do violence....
    Cindy

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  • Guest's Avatar
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    Bart's release

    hey Cindy see my post on issue 6 elsewhere on the board. I think John "let him go" to use as bait to get to Cavendish. He knows that Butch will have to tie up all loose ends which includes Bart and that will give clues to the motives and whereabouts of Cavendish. I think Bart will eventually see bars but his involvement illustrates much of the Creed and serves to prompt Tonto toward John's (and maybe his own) belief system. Note that Bart's world view is totally opposite than John's especially the colorblind Creed but its obvious that John and Linda's treatment of him is something completely foreign to him. And also to be shown mercy in combat from a white man no less is something that might change him hence the guns. He did give Butch the money back so at least his priorities are shifting abit. Time and hopefully a one shot will tell the rest of his story. I also like the fact that Tonto left the knife (his and Matthews' symbolic killing talisman) with Bart essentially making his own choice and choosing life while putting the same choice in Bart's hands. As for said jail time what's a dead man to do make a citizens arrest in the 1870's or have the Indian bring him in (which would likely get them both hanged). Such is the peril of too much reality.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Kemo Sabay

    Heck, i wasn't going to go thru the trouble, but i re-read some of Dave Holland's book "From out of the past: A pictorial history of the lone ranger." (And please no one tell my husband i haven't put it on ebay after i planned to like 6 months ago. {sigh})

    on the word 'kemo sabay.' here's what it says:

    Story Number Three is irrefutable.
    you know that boys camp that [series writer/director who hired Striker] james jewell's father-in-law ran on mullet lake [northern michigan]? Guess what it's name was. "Kee-mo Sahbee." that's even the way they spelled it when it was named that back in 1915, 18 years before The Lone Ranger went on the air. and that's where james jewell got 'kemo sabe." he was the one to put it into the scrpts (where it was spelled "kemo sabay," incidentally.)
    Brace Beemer liked to tell people it meant "faithful friend" but Jewell insisted that it only meant 'trusty scout.' "that's the only thing it has ever meant," he told Rothel, "or ever will mean." Period, by God. (Holland. 1987. p. 155.)

    quick-someone tell the comic writers!
    CindyR
    Crossposted on ezboard

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Train Crash

    I took another look at the panel. No, it's obvious that it's *only* the last car and wood-carrier that derails due to the Ranger's bullet, not the whole train. i'm willing to assume he could see whether or not people were in the last car (caboose?) but it's pretty obvious the rest of the train does not jump the track (or at least, does not fly off the track). and who knows? if we were some teenaged kid chasing his family's murderer, we might not think about the biggest possible consequences either.

    no reason to believe the trip from wyoming only took 2 days. remember, he was chasing Bart the whole way and probably only arrived at linda's house a couple of days after Bart before turning right around and continuing the chase. it's not likely they were gonna meet going back and forth, after all.
    wonder if tonto was faking for awhile to give the kid time to get back?
    Cindy

    Previous Quote:
    _____________________
    I've looked at this over and over and have come to the conclusion that the Lone Ranger shot the lever to make the train switch tracks. In my opinion, the train crashed. Even if it were just the back part, a wreck like that would derail and stop the train. Others were sure to have been injured or killed in a crash of that magnitude. It's a failure in the story that the Ranger wasn't concerned for others on the train.
    I find it hard to believe that Bart was able to be as physical as he was with a knife wound to the shoulder and a bullet wound in his hand. I think the telegram is proof that Bart did survive. I think it very odd that he would give the Ranger his guns and that the Ranger would accept them. I also think it was a flaw to let Bart go free.
    Also, Brett Matthews really needs a lesson in U.S. geography. The trip between the northwestern most part of Texas and Laramie, Wyo., would take about 12 hours by car (if you wore an astronaut diaper ), but several weeks by horse. To do it in two days would mean violating some laws of physics and nature.

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