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  • Originally posted by Lord Talavar View Post
    I must agree with you there. A complete retro-style Dick Tracy comic from IDW akin to their Popeye comics would be really interesting.
    There's a cue for someone from IDW to jump in and say, "OK, Chief, I'll get on it right away... !"

    Actually, now that I think of it, I wouldn't mind seeing a comic book version that also included the TV characters of Joe Jitsu, Go-Go Gomez, Hemlock Holmes and Officer Heap O'Callory (as long as they didn't force Tracy into a walk-on role in his own series...). And, of course, Moon Maid. Just to prove that the forces of law and order can be just as weird and outlandish as the forces of crime. I wish someone would make a new Dick Tracy animated show. But it would probably have to be too watered-down by BS&P to air on something like Cartoon Network or Nickelodeon.

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    • I could se them doing a rotating back up featuring the TV characters and having them occasionally appear in the main story.
      Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
      Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
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      • Originally posted by Ghornet2 View Post
        I could se them doing a rotating back up featuring the TV characters and having them occasionally appear in the main story.
        The animated cartoons were very different from the Chester Gould comic strip, with Tracy's role diminished to merely handing out assignments, then showing up for the collar at the end of the episode. I was thinking more along the lines of integrating (no pun intended regarding Asian, Hispanic or Irish stereotypes) those characters into the regular Tracy cast of good guys, along with Tess Trueheart, Junior, Chief Pat Patton, Sam Catchem, etc. Upon further refection, I think that would work, with the exception of Hemlock Holmes. A talking bulldog wearing a Keystone Cops-style police helmet might be too much to accept even in a world where Moon People exist. Or was that supposed to be a London bobby's cap? I never really identified the accent as English, but I guess a British Bulldog named Holmes makes some sort of sense. Anyway, I don't know if the regular Tracy cast wants to stray into talking animal territory... Joe Jitsu, Go-Go Gomez, and Heap O'Callory were all caricatured humans, and the names at least seem to fit in with the Chet Gould mold of punning monickers. I don't know who designed the characters (some UPA animation director, probably) but it doesn't look like Gould was involved. Still, I think they can be made to fit into Gould's world of cartoon humans, by tweaking the characters' appearance to be closer to Gould's style. Despite the fact that these characters have some stereotypical comic-relief aspects to them, they mostly managed to bag the bad guys in those cartoons without Tracy's help (sometimes relying on the cheater of "Hold everything!", whereupon the action would freeze around them while they were in a tight spot, giving them a moment to report in to Tracy via 2-way wrist TV), so they can't be completely useless.

        Click image for larger version

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        One thing I wasn't aware of regarding The Dick Tracy Show, is that UPA once teamed up Dick Tracy with Mr. Magoo.

        (From Wikipedia):
        "Since UPA was also the producer of the Mr. Magoo cartoons, it was possible for them to arrange a meeting between Tracy and Magoo in a 1965 episode of the TV series The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo. In this episode, "Dick Tracy and the Mob," Tracy persuades Magoo (a well-known actor in the context of the Famous Adventures series) to impersonate an international hit man whom he resembles, and infiltrate a gang of criminals made up of Flattop, Pruneface, Itchy, Mumbles, and others. Unlike the earlier animated Tracy shorts, this longer episode was played relatively straight, with Tracy getting much more screen time. It's notable for pitting Tracy against a coalition of several of his foes, a conceit that would be adopted more than two decades later in the 1990 film."

        The episode is available on the Shout Factory DVD collection Mr. Magoo: The Television Collection, 1960-1977. I have no idea if Joe Jitsu, Go-Go Gomez, Heap O'Callory, or Hemlock Holmes put in an appearance in this episode.

        The set is kinda pricey, but I had always wanted to have the Famous Adventures series since it featured Magoo doing a "Classics Illustrated" animated version of various literary stories, and after finding out about the Tracy team-up episode I just had to order this. I found a pretty interesting article about The Dick Tracy Show here.
        Last edited by pulphero; 12-16-2013, 03:45 AM.

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        • So I finally got the Shout Factory DVD, MR. MAGOO: THE TELEVISION COLLECTION 1960-1977, which includes the original Mr. Magoo Show, The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo, Uncle Sam Magoo (TV special), and What's New, Magoo?

          I was immediately interested in viewing the episode of The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo, "Dick Tracy and the Mob", in which Tracy recruits 'famous stage actor' Quincy Magoo (the context of The Famous Adventures series) to impersonate a hitman named "Squinty Eyes" who is being snuck back into the U.S. from deportation in Europe by Pruneface and his mob (consisting of Flattop, B.B. Eyes, Mumbles, The Brow, Itchy, Oodles, and The Mole) for the express purpose of eliminating Dick Tracy. Unlike the UPA Dick Tracy Show, Dick Tracy himself has major screen time in this half-hour episode, about equal screen time with Magoo (both as himself and as 'Squinty Eyes'). None of the various Tracy assistants from the Dick Tracy Show (Joe Jitsu, Go-Go Gomez, Heap O'Callory, and Hemlock Holmes) appears here, and comedy is kept to a minimum (which was pretty standard for stories from The Famous Adventures series). Since all of the episodes of The Dick Tracy Show were 5 minutes, and Tracy had very little screen time in each, and the segments of Dick Tracy that appeared in Filmation's Fabulous Funnies

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          • Not a new licence, but I would love to see DE collect and reprint Shadow Strikes in few trades.It's still head and shoulders above any other Shadow comic series, old or new.

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            • Originally posted by pjerooo View Post
              Not a new licence, but I would love to see DE collect and reprint Shadow Strikes in few trades.It's still head and shoulders above any other Shadow comic series, old or new.
              Well, I'd put it a step below DC's original Shadow series by Denny O'Neil and Mike Kaluta (which they should also reprint), but otherwise I'm all for it. At the very least, they should reprint DC's Shadow/Doc Savage crossover as a standalone TPB, while they still have the licenses to both.

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              • Yup, Kaluta\O'Neil run should definitely be reprinted, but in all honesty I cannot put it above Shadow Strikes.Gerard Jones wrote much better than Danny O'Neal and while Barreto's art respects Kaluta's vision, it also upgrades it dramatically, making it (imo) the best visual representation of the Shadow.But of course - tastes

                Anyway, I like to imagine SS reprints like this:

                Book 1 - Shadow Strikes #1-4 + Shadow Strikes Annual #1
                Book 2 - Shadow Strikes #5-6 + Doc Savage #17-18
                Book 3 - Shadow Strikes #7-11
                Book 4 - Shadow Strikes #12-17
                Book 5 - Shadow Strikes #18-24
                Book 6 - Shadow Strikes #25-31

                No arcs get cut this way, with the exception of second Shiwan Khan arc (#21-27) which can be split in two (#21-24 & #25-27) without any fuss.Also, Shadow\Doc Savage crossover is neatly collected in one smaller TPB.

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                • Originally posted by pjerooo View Post
                  Yup, Kaluta\O'Neil run should definitely be reprinted, but in all honesty I cannot put it above Shadow Strikes.Gerard Jones wrote much better than Danny O'Neal and while Barreto's art respects Kaluta's vision, it also upgrades it dramatically, making it (imo) the best visual representation of the Shadow.But of course - tastes

                  Anyway, I like to imagine SS reprints like this:

                  Book 1 - Shadow Strikes #1-4 + Shadow Strikes Annual #1
                  Book 2 - Shadow Strikes #5-6 + Doc Savage #17-18
                  Book 3 - Shadow Strikes #7-11
                  Book 4 - Shadow Strikes #12-17
                  Book 5 - Shadow Strikes #18-24
                  Book 6 - Shadow Strikes #25-31

                  No arcs get cut this way, with the exception of second Shiwan Khan arc (#21-27) which can be split in two (#21-24 & #25-27) without any fuss.Also, Shadow\Doc Savage crossover is neatly collected in one smaller TPB.
                  I'd buy them, even though I have all the original issues. Actually, I'll agree that this series is probably the priority, since DC did reprint the O'Neil/Kaluta Shadow stories in a hardcover collection (although this is now something like 25 years ago). DC's concurrent Doc Savage series (with the exception of that crossover and a few other issues towards the end of the run) was nowhere near as good.

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                  • Hopefully, DE will have ears for this

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                    • The Cave Girl

                      The Cave Girl (1913), and its continuation as The Cave Man (1914) by Edgar Rice Burroughs

                      Waldo Emerson Smith-Jones is swept overboard during a south seas voyage, only to find himself on a jungle island, where he meets Nadara, and his life changes forever

                      The originality in this is following the road of a snub & coward and becoming the courageous hero known as Thandar




                      Originally published in All-Story and All-Story Weekly





                      Plot summary (SPOILER WARNING)

                      Blueblooded mama's boy Waldo Emerson Smith-Jones is swept overboard during a south seas voyage for his lifelong ill health. He finds himself on a jungle island. His bookish education has not prepared him to cope with these surroundings, and he is a coward. He is terrified when he encounters primitive, violent men, ape-like throwbacks in mankind's evolutionary history. He runs from them, but when he reaches a dead end, he successfully makes a stand, astonishing himself. While keeping the hairy brutes at bay, he meets a beautiful girl, Nadara, also on the run. In an uncharacteristic gesture, he saves her from the grasp of one ape-man during their escape. He is shocked that she believes him a hero, mistaking his frightened screams for war cries. She calls him Thandar, meaning the brave one. She teaches him the language, how to swim, how to fish, and basic woodcraft, as he begins to realize that he doesn't know everything. However, Nadara warns him that a newcomer to her tribe must fight the strongest men, who have killed many. When they reach her home village, he is horrified to see that despite her appearance, her tribe seems to be cavemen from the paleolithic era, not much better than the first tribe. In order to avoid death at the hands of the tribal bullies, he vanishes.

                      As his jungle adventures continue, he finds that he is growing more healthy due to the constant physical demands of primitive living. Although he wants to go back to see Nadara, he recognizes that he will need more strength before he can make a difference. For six months he trains himself, and also makes some weapons. A modern ship stops at the island, but Waldo surprises himself by deciding to stay until he can ensure Nadara's safety. He gives the crew a letter for his mother and returns to the jungle.

                      Upon reaching Nadara's tribe's caves, he finds them empty, for they routinely move to new caves. He kills one of her oppressors, but then misses her on the trail. He finds the tribe's new home, and her father charges Waldo to give her a packet of her deceased mother's things. Waldo tracks and finds Nadara, and kills the brutal man chasing her. She is uninterested in the packet, discarding it unopened as she knows her tribal mother had no possessions. Then they spy a ship approaching the island. As he suddenly realizes he loves her, and how harshly society would treat her, the two of them agree to head for the hills. The ship's search party finds the packet Nadara carelessly discarded, and discovers that the contents identify a married noble couple from modern society, who disappeared on a voyage less than 20 years previously.

                      Part Two

                      Before they get far, Waldo changes his mind, realizing that his love for Nadara is such that he wants her to have everything he can offer. However, they meet the hostile ape-men on their way to the beach, and when they finally arrive, the ship is gone. They return to Nadara's tribe. On his deathbed, her father explains her mother was actually a woman who arrived in a small boat with a dead man; she died right after giving birth to Nadara. Waldo decides that living with Nadara under primitive moral customs would be wrong, and determines not to take her as his wife until they can return to civilization. He teaches her English in preparation.

                      Waldo teaches the tribe about rule by consent of the governed, and they choose him as king. He begins to introduce them to concepts such as agriculture and permanent housing. He has them make spears and shields, and they successfully fight off a raid by the ape-like tribe. However, one ape-man returns that night and kidnaps Nadara. Away from the caves, an earthquake frightens him and he releases her. When she returns to the cliff dwellings, she finds them in ruins. She cannot locate Waldo's cave nor lift the rocks she finds, so she assumes everyone is dead, and leaves the next day to find a new home.

                      Back in the States, Waldo's parents decide to send another search mission after they receive his letter. His mother and father both come along. They find Nadara being chased by an ape-man, who they quickly kill. She explains Waldo's death in the earthquake, and Mr. Smith-Jones decides to bring her home. However, his wife is hostile to Nadara. The ship departs, but a storm blows it back towards the islands. When Stark, the first officer, grabs Nadara on the deck late at night, he kidnaps her overboard to a nearby shore. Upon returning to consciousness, she quickly escapes him, but they are captured by a tribe of cannibals. Stark is killed but she is treated considerately.

                      In the meantime, it seems that Waldo is indeed alive, though he lay unconscious and trapped in his cave a long time. He discovers from a caveman that Nadara left on a ship, and determinedly builds a tiny boat to go after her. After a storm he is washed ashore on a new island, and saves a pirate king from a cannibal. One of the pirates tells of a white goddess at a cannibal temple inland, so Waldo goes to search for Nadara. He rescues her, but they are pursued all the way to the coast. His pirate friends have left, so they are forced to use his little boat again. When they reach land, they are captured by more pirates, who then bring them to a modern boat - his father's ship. It also is being held by the pirates, who are awaiting their leader's return. Waldo's parents initially do not recognize him, but after they do, Waldo's mother reconciles with Nadara. When the pirate king arrives, he recognizes Waldo as his savior and releases the entire group. They sail to Honolulu, and the ship's captain presents Nadara with the found packet as a wedding present, not realizing her connection to it. They discover her noble heritage, and she and Waldo marry.
                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cave_Girl
                      Last edited by Renaud; 03-05-2014, 12:41 PM.

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                      • G'day,

                        Only the other day I was thinking if DE have sorted out their trade mark issues with ERB inc they could run a series called "Jungle Tales" or some such and run Tarzan, Korak , Cave Girl etc mini series under the title.

                        ta

                        Ralph





                        Originally posted by Renaud View Post
                        The Cave Girl (1913), and its continuation as The Cave Man (1914) by Edgar Rice Burroughs

                        Waldo Emerson Smith-Jones is swept overboard during a south seas voyage, only to find himself on a jungle island, where he meets Nadara, and his life changes forever

                        The originality in this is following the road of a snub & coward and becoming the courageous hero known as Thandar





                        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Cave_Girl

                        Comment


                        • intelligence
                          the CBS TV show concerning cyber-com agent Gabriel Vaughn
                          who can call up computer data via a computer chip implanted in his head

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                          • G'day,

                            We haven't seen Intelligence yet , I think its coming to Australia this year but I have seen the trailer. Reminds me of a 1970's TV show called Search/Probe about a secret agent with a super duper mini camera linked in to satellite networks. Looks good. Would make a good team up with the Bionic Man.
                            ta

                            Ralph

                            Originally posted by magnus robot fighter View Post
                            intelligence
                            the CBS TV show concerning cyber-com agent Gabriel Vaughn
                            who can call up computer data via a computer chip implanted in his head

                            Comment


                            • DC had a book called Xero years ago which was very similar. If you like that sort of thing, check that out on the cheap. I friggin' loved it.

                              Unlikely that they would let him go, mind you, but perhaps not impossible. I know that J. Torres got the rights to his Family Dynamic book so it's not unheard of.

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                              • There are a lot of licenses I would like to see Dynamite pick up, but in all honesty, I think I am done with modern comic collecting. From here on out I think I am gonna stick with golden age and silver age comics. Maybe a few bronze age here and there. The modern comic companies are ruining the industry with the whole variant isssue nonsense. If they want to release a single variant cover for an issue, than that would be fine. Either 1:100 or 1:50 would be fine. The number of variants that are being produced today is nothing short of ridiculous. Dynamite is now producing vriants as limited as 10, and charging $200 an issue for them. Just look to baseball cards back in the late 80's and early 90's to see the end game of this line of thinking. Soon enough, there will be so many variants, that even keeping track of all of them will become impossible. The prices will crash, especially in non super hero comic series. If you honestly think your going to be able to sell Zenescope covers for anywhere near what people are paying for them today, even 5 years from now, your in for a big awakening. Same with Dynamite's super limited 10 and 25 variant releases. If you pay 200 bucks for a modern comic, simply because its blue instead or red or red instead of black.....well, you might as well just take your money out and burn it.

                                I am a big fan of Lucio Parrillo so I will probably continue to buy his covers and his covers only. Beyond that, I wont be buying any more Dynamite comics from here on out. I would need to see a complete reversal in policy in regards to how they are appraoching the entire market. Some releases now have as many as 8-10 different covers for a single issue. Just look at what Aspen comics did with Lady Mechanika. Only 3 complete issues were ever released, yet there have to be upwards of 35-40 different issues on the market. Its insane, and I guarantee those comics will be next to worthless 10 years from now.

                                Do yourselves a favor and if your going to collect, collect golden age, silver age or bronze age comics. Stop buying modern and send a clear and strong message that the current comic market is completely out of control. Either that or you can expect to see a crash of the variant market within the next 10 years. Modern comics will follow the same path as baseball cards.

                                Dont believe me, just wait and see.

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