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The Boys # 72 FINAL RECAP: So much for people remaining the same...

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  • The Boys # 72 FINAL RECAP: So much for people remaining the same...

    I am stealing the honor to write the Boys' final recap from Kamakazi, who by now should have kept faith to his nickname and committed ritual suicide in front of the local Guinness pub. Poor guy. Hope you'll drag as many Irish comic writers as possible to hell with you.


    So, here we are. The party is over. Nothing will ever be the same. EXPECIALLY HUGHIE, whose main (only?) strength, according to Butcher, Annie, his parents and Ennis, was supposed to be his doubtful ability to remain the same nice, straight, bleeding heart kid he's always been, no matter what the circumstances and the pressures he's forced upon.

    Guess what. Six months after Butcher's demise (his final masterpiece), the one and only Highland Laddie now outsmarts even James Bond, not mentioning James "ninety over sixty" Stillwell, the head of CIA and Butcher himself. Sounds plausible.

    So this is it, ladies (ladies?) and gentlemen. I dreamed of a grim ending for the Boys. Good guys suffering, the triumph of evil, something like that. It's actually far worse: everybody loses.

    No vengeance for poor Mother's Milk. No point in fighting corporations: they always win, expecially when your homie forgets to kill the evil mastermind. His dad died in vain. And let's not think about his mom.

    No underage love story for Frenchie and the Female. All they got is their initials on the Brooklyn Bridge, which reminded me not only of Ennis' first mini on Nick Fury, but expecially of the fact that Frenchie and the Female never gave a damn about the bridge in the first place.

    No final honor for grandpa Mallory, who doesn't even manage to get his initials on the bridge. Talk about wasting your life.

    No rich pension for the Deep, who ends up posing as Living Condom, the new amazing superhero from Vought. I swear I'll never complain about DC comics' reboots anymore.

    No final victory for Vought Guy, who for the first time in his life weeps, all because his product continues to suck mightly. Man, just quit VA and get a job from Apple: same profits, same nerdy audience, same evil unleashed on the world.

    No political triumph for mrs. Rayner, whose campaign gets screwed by the combined efforts of - hold your breath - Hughie and the Monkey! Now that's a defeat. BTW, American voters have strange tastes: Italian political candidates release their own sex tapes all the time. Yes, even movies.

    And, finally, no justice for us, who are condemned to see Hughie and Annie happy together, doing the dreaded spinning thing without even Bobby Badoing appearing out of nowhere and landing on them, just to make a final laugh. Crap.



    (Kamakazi, if you read this, please make another recap. Let's make this pain worth something)
    Last edited by Boris; 11-15-2012, 03:11 PM.

  • #2
    Yes, Hughie remained the same lovable good guy, as he himself acknowledges, despite murdering A-Train and Butcher in rages (so funny Butcher was ready to check out like that..."V" can bring the dead to life, but evidently it can't reconnect a severed spinal chord), while neither could defend themselves. Hughie can even smile as he reminisces about Butcher, the man who killed his best friends.

    I guess if there is anything to take away from this as a lesson, it's that killing makes you stronger. It did for Hughie.

    Maybe that's Stilwell's problem- he stopped killing, so he became weak. This is the guy who ordered mercenaries to kill a few score G-Men and a platoon of special forces, but he backs down from Hughie. Yeah, wee Hughie. That's a guy that Stilwell could never have killed, for sure.

    Luckily, Hughie and Annie are back together! It only took a heartfelt phone message! Who would have thought?

    I feel ripped off by the last series, post #65. I'm not using "ripped off" as a euphemism. Most of the characters were dispositioned by having them fall in a well, and the three key characters (Butcher, Stilwell, and Hughie) all had personality changes. Nothing significant was accomplished by this arc, other than the extraction of about $30.

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    • #3
      -___-

      oh yea, forgot about mallory. good points in bringing up many loose ends closure wise. I guess Ill just re read the first few trade paperbacks then

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      • #4
        Frankly, I can't think of a better way to end the series than for Boris to come back and do the final recap. As some of you no doubt recall, we switched off doing them there for a while.

        Also, I literally have nothing to say regarding this issue. It was the very definition of "Not with a bang, but with a whimper" for me. In retrospect, this board was right: The series should have ended way back with the Homelander/Blacklander showdown. Everything that's happened since then has just been sad and anti-climatic. It's as if Disney decided to do a sequel to Star Wars that was nothing but 110 minutes of Han and Leia arguing over why her lazy brother can't find a job.

        I guess part of my depression springs from the fact that I genuinely like every single person that comments here, WAY more than I ever liked the series itself. We ain't never gonna get to talk no more, and it sucks that it had to end on such a predictable, unremarkable note.

        The only part of the entire issue that I liked was Stilwell saying "That one is obviously The Deep", while our poor Aquatic hero stands around looking like a cross between a Klan member and a condom. Everything else was completely pointless, witless, and depressing. And now, instead of some grand send-off party, we're all sitting around with our dorks in our hands, trying to avoid eye-contact while we mumble our way slowly to the exit. I want to nut-punch Ennis just for that alone.
        Last edited by Kamakazi; 11-15-2012, 09:50 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Kamakazi View Post
          nut-punch Ennis
          BRING IT, WANKER.


          I hope you sods appreciated Vought Guy/Stillwell spelling out in terms as mind-numbingly heavy handed as possible just what it is that his character represents. I supposed, quite rightly I now feel, that my readership needed things dumbed down for them a bit. It does, after all, include a charlatan Mormon priest, a snotty ordained Presbyterian prick, and a semi-literate probably-frosty-haired gold-chain-wearing guido.

          See you in hell, boys. It's been quite a ride.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Garth View Post
            It's been quite a ride.
            But not a Big Ride.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Garth View Post
              a semi-literate probably-frosty-haired gold-chain-wearing guido.

              Feel the fury of Sixpack, you rotten, lice-infested evildoer!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Boris View Post
                Feel the fury of Sixpack, you rotten, lice-infested evildoer!
                Ah, a Hitman reference. I'm starting to feel a little better. Not much, but a little.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kamakazi View Post
                  I'm starting to feel a little better. Not much, but a little.

                  Bueno...




                  (Ah, those good ol'times, when Ennis characters had some real beef, and endings were deep and meaningful...)

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kamakazi View Post
                    Also, I literally have nothing to say regarding this issue. It was the very definition of "Not with a bang, but with a whimper" for me.
                    In case you missed my T.S. Eliot take...

                    http://www.dynamite.net/boards/showt...6513#post26513

                    I was pretty much a defender of Ennis all the way through issue #65, and have turned 180 degrees for issues 66 - 72. Question- is it possible that he wrote badly on purpose? Just as "True" (the best moment of the issue) is a snipe at reboots (The New 52, MarvelNow), could all the crappy plotting- the sudden personality changes, newly introduced major plot points, the dropping of prior major plot points- could it all be a meta-commentary on the comic book writing business?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by statsman View Post
                      I was pretty much a defender of Ennis all the way through issue #65, and have turned 180 degrees for issues 66 - 72. Question- is it possible that he wrote badly on purpose? Just as "True" (the best moment of the issue) is a snipe at reboots (The New 52, MarvelNow), could all the crappy plotting- the sudden personality changes, newly introduced major plot points, the dropping of prior major plot points- could it all be a meta-commentary on the comic book writing business?


                      Thought of that myself for a while in the last months. Then I remembered an old Ennis interview (couple of years ago) in which he stated that, when in real life you're faced with the Vatican surviving unscathed the children abuses scandal, the Lehman Brothers affair and shit like that, suddenly the idea of an evil corporation wanting to profit over depraved supes isn't fun anymore. Could be that he simply thought "the hell with it!" and destroyed his own world.

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                      • #12
                        I began re-reading the whole series last friday. It's cool (and a bit sad) to catch all the little details when you know where it's all going.

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                        • #13
                          I thought the epilogue was quietly satisfying. It wasn't a million miles away – in terms of tone – from the final issue of Preacher, though it took place on a less ambitious scale. Above all, I thought it was beautifully drawn. Robertson really is a class act – he can do satire, gross-out and pathos pretty much on the same page. As a standout comic, it's not especially satisfying, but in the context of the book as a whole I think it will stand up, especially with the trades. For anyone who has read The Boys carefully, there obviously were not many surprises – Rayner's political demise was satisfying and the final confrontation with Stillwell was handled with subtlety, something Ennis has been more comfortable with in recent years. The 'balloon' tribute to Frenchy and the Female was a nice touch, and the final frame was simply beautiful.

                          I've probably been one of the more slavish Ennis supporters on this board, but I have to sympathise with some of the views on the Butcher-geddon arc. I don't think it was some insidious commentary on the comic business (even Hughie wouldn't support that conspiracy theory), though I wouldn't be surprised if Dynamite had encouraged Ennis to spin out the series because it was proving so popular. Clearly Ennis leaves possible plot developments open during his writing, and chooses whether or not to follow them further down the line... it looks as if the possibility of a supe doomsday device had been conceived as early as the Mother Russia arc, and was being referred to obliquely by Butcher in the Super-duper arc. I just have to conclude that Ennis got a bit lost on this one... I was particularly nonplussed by the way Butcher keeps suckering Hughie into becoming an accidental killing machine. I just didn't buy that.

                          So farewell then, Boys. At least until Darrick's inexplicable A-Train prequel. Looking beyond that, I look forward to Russell Crowe's east London accent being widely ridiculed when the film finally comes out in another 10 years or so. Ennis has said this is a big goodbye to the Boys universe, but there's a a lot of open-ended stuff here and if the book keeps a high cultish currency (or becomes a successful film franchise) I wouldn't be surprised if he were to return to The Boys after a long break. I think there's a lot of scope for a meta-human series – sans spandex – that focuses on a world of disgraced supes. There could even be a completely new team, Boys II... but only if and when Ennis wants it.
                          Last edited by Simon Rogerson; 11-22-2012, 07:11 AM.

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                          • #14
                            I dont know about you guys but I really do have high expectations for that A-Train miniseries even if thats probably a really bad idea.

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                            • #15
                              If it's an attempt at humanizing the A-Train, I probably won't read it.




                              Who am I kidding? I'll probably do.

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