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  • IDW lost Dr. Who--is DE interested?

    I learned that IDW lost its contract (expired) with Dr. Who to publish American version of the Time Lord's adventures. Would DE consider adding the Time Lord to its roster of great titles? I am old enough to start with the Tom Baker years when my PBS station played them back in the 1980s every night (a blessed time). As a high school student wanting more action in my Doctor, I was taken aback when Peter Davidson, who replaced Baker, kept fainting in almost every adventure (I now can appreciate that he was attempting to build vulnerability into the character). While waiting for more Peter Davidson episodes to be made, my PBS station started showing the Jon Pertwee/UNIT episodes. Pertwee's man-of-action Doctor in his Austin Powers outfit (Canadian Myers must have been inspired by watching old BBC episodes) using/building gadgets, driving fast roadsters, and demonstrating Venusian martial arts became my favorite Doctor. The new Doctors starting with Eccleston and the two Doctors so far that have followed him have introduced the much needed special effects and clever character development that was much needed in the old "good high school play" version of Dr. Who that I grew up on (We live in a golden age with computerized special effect--In my youth, we had to imagine that Godzilla was not a guy in a rubber suit and that Superman and Captain Marvel could really fly). I loved the character interplay between the Doctor and the Brigadier and the Doctor's relationships with his companions like Liz Shaw and Sgt. Benton. The Tom Baker and David Tennant Doctors were great as they explored both time and space with great humor and personality. Some friends of mine became scientists, they tell me, due to Dr. Who. I became a history teacher (who still wants his time machine).

    If not the Doctor, how about Stargate? Perhaps a series that takes place between each of the seasons of the 10 year sci-fi series? The character interplay of Col. Jack O'Neil and Dr. Daniel Jackson complemented each other greatly. As a military science fiction show, I felt the tv series was limited by the budget. A comic would not be restricted by the special effects budget. I enjoy Stargate for the homage to the UNIT/Dr. Who days but with a better special effects budget. O'Neil (Brigadier character) wants the military solution. Jackson (The Doctor character) wants the intellectual solution. Carter (Liz Shaw character) wants to be respected as a scientist. And Teal'c (Sgt. Benton character) wants to be the loyal fighter on the team. If DE can't get the Doctor, why not Stargate?

  • #2
    I dont know if Doctor Who would fit with Dynamite

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Ralok View Post
      I dont know if Doctor Who would fit with Dynamite
      I somewhat agree. Especially the current Matt Smith Doctor-who-can-do-anything approach. That is why I appreciate the stranded-on-Earth-UNIT stories. The Doctor actually has to think his way out of situations, not wave a sonic screwdriver and make anything happen. During the Pertwee years, the sonic screwdriver was used primarily as a lock pick rarely as a weapon to save the day.

      Stargate would probably fit better as the world at large does not know of the Stargate Program. And importantly, it is humans in a military situation on another planet. An update of Flash Gordon and John Carter type stories.

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      • #4
        Does Dynamite have access to the Rook(a Warren/Harris character), who can fit both the concepts of Dr. Who and Stargate.
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        • #5
          Originally posted by rasx View Post
          Does Dynamite have access to the Rook(a Warren/Harris character), who can fit both the concepts of Dr. Who and Stargate.
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          As long as the Rook and his supporting cast as shown as they were in the Warren magazines, Harris rebooted the character eliminating his supporting cast and gave him some sort of chrono-armor making him like some sort of Image character--ugggh. As a contemporary of Vampi, the Rook would also have that pulp like feel of Doc, the Spider, and the Shadow. I agree. DE get the Rook!

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          • #6
            I too loved The Rook. Especially loved that they acknowledged H.G. Wells' Time Traveler as part of The Rook's continuity. Never really could get into Dr. Who, despite the best efforts of several people to "convert" me (they do seem to be a particularly evangelical fandom). Some of the SF concepts involved seemed interesting enough, but in practice, episodes I have sampled just failed to grab my interest and get me excited about the character.

            Then again, The Rook had a pretty limited run (even shorter in his own magazine), and Dr. Who has been running for 40 years (don't know if there was a substantial hibernation period anywhere in there) and as evidenced by its multileveled merchandising, retains a strong following. Still, it was The Rook that I liked. I always seem to pick the underdog in a popularity contest.

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            • #7
              The Rook, would be cheaper to license and with its limited run, there would be more stories too tell.

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              • #8
                They could easily introduce The Rook in a story that crosses over with DE's other time traveler, Miss Fury.

                But if DE isn't going to publish new adventures of The Rook, could we at least get a hardcover reprint collection of his classic stories from Dark Horse Comics? The Rook appeared in about 20 issues of EERIE before getting his own magazine, which ran for 14 issues, plus one "Warren Presents THE ROOK" special that reprinted his first four stories from EERIE. The Rook's own magazine also had a whole host of ongoing supporting features (Voltar, Joe Guy, Viking Prince, Kronos), one of which (The Goblin), managed to spin off into its own magazine for 3 issues. After THE ROOK was cancelled, he returned to EERIE for 3 additional appearances.

                Now that I think about it, in addition to Vampirella, Pantha and The Rook, there were a whole bunch of characters who had regular on-and-off series rotating through issues of EERIE or VAMPIRELLA. Frequently these had a sort of tongue-in-cheek humor to them that was very similar to what was going on concurrently in the British SF anthology comic 2000 AD. What can you say about a series called "Rex Havoc and the Asskickers of the Fantastic"? I mean, you hear the title and it either immediately makes you want to read it, or have nothing to do with it. When it proved popular enough with readers to gain it's own "Warren Presents" reprint one-shot, they had to reign themselves back a little and re-title it as "Rex Havoc and the Raiders of the Fantastic" because "Asskickers" was deemed too unmarketable a cover logo for the magazine racks of 1981.

                Another good question: since DE purchased the characters Vampirella and Pantha (along with associated supporting cast members) from Harris Comics, and Harris Comics also used The Rook, does DE already own the character? The fact that the characters crossed over into each others' respective series during the Warren era, makes me wonder.

                Wow, we really derailed the Dr. Who thread, didn't we? Sorry about that, Blinky.
                Last edited by pulphero; 10-23-2013, 10:09 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                  They could easily introduce The Rook in a story that crosses over with DE's other time traveler, Miss Fury.

                  But if DE isn't going to publish new adventures of The Rook, could we at least get a hardcover reprint collection of his classic stories from Dark Horse Comics? The Rook appeared in about 20 issues of EERIE before getting his own magazine, which ran for 14 issues, plus one "Warren Presents THE ROOK" special that reprinted his first four stories from EERIE. The Rook's own magazine also had a whole host of ongoing supporting features (Voltar, Joe Guy, Viking Prince, Kronos), one of which (The Goblin), managed to spin off into its own magazine for 3 issues. After THE ROOK was cancelled, he returned to EERIE for 3 additional appearances.

                  Now that I think about it, in addition to Vampirella, Pantha and The Rook, there were a whole bunch of characters who had regular on-and-off series rotating through issues of EERIE or VAMPIRELLA. Frequently these had a sort of tongue-in-cheek humor to them that was very similar to what was going on concurrently in the British SF anthology comic 2000 AD. What can you say about a series called "Rex Havoc and the Asskickers of the Fantastic"? I mean, you hear the title and it either immediately makes you want to read it, or have nothing to do with it. When it proved popular enough with readers to gain it's own "Warren Presents" reprint one-shot, they had to reign themselves back a little and re-title it as "Rex Havoc and the Raiders of the Fantastic" because "Asskickers" was deemed too unmarketable a cover logo for the magazine racks of 1981.

                  Another good question: since DE purchased the characters Vampirella and Pantha (along with associated supporting cast members) from Harris Comics, and Harris Comics also used The Rook, does DE already own the character? The fact that the characters crossed over into each others' respective series during the Warren era, makes me wonder.

                  Wow, we really derailed the Dr. Who thread, didn't we? Sorry about that, Blinky.
                  I'm not sure if DE got the characters who first appeared in EERIE and Creepy magazine, so its uncertain if they got the Rook.
                  "In 1983 James Warren declared banckruptcy and the HARRIS PUBLICATIONS bought the companys assets same year. This was followed by a lawsuit that eventually gave back the rights of EERIE and CREEPY to James Warren in 1998. "- from Comicvine

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rasx View Post
                    I'm not sure if DE got the characters who first appeared in EERIE and Creepy magazine, so its uncertain if they got the Rook.
                    "In 1983 James Warren declared banckruptcy and the HARRIS PUBLICATIONS bought the companys assets same year. This was followed by a lawsuit that eventually gave back the rights of EERIE and CREEPY to James Warren in 1998. "- from Comicvine
                    Hmm. Didn't know about the lawsuit part. I wonder if Warren in turn sold the rights to CREEPY and EERIE after 1998 to Dark Horse, or if they are only licensing them from him? Still want that hardcover collection of the complete ROOK stories.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                      Hmm. Didn't know about the lawsuit part. I wonder if Warren in turn sold the rights to CREEPY and EERIE after 1998 to Dark Horse, or if they are only licensing them from him? Still want that hardcover collection of the complete ROOK stories.
                      Now that there is going to be a Pantha HC soon from DE, I too call for a ROOK HC collection! I remember that god-awful Rook that Harris tried to put out--this Rook jettisoned the great supporting cast for an armored-covered almost Image Comics inspired character that just did not work. I like the Warren magazine version!
                      http://d1466nnw0ex81e.cloudfront.net...600/688027.jpg

                      http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...px-Eerie95.jpg

                      Dark Horse is publishing a series of new quarterlies (?) about each Eerie and Creepy as well as reprinting the Warren stuff.

                      I suggested on the Vampi forum that DE could try to get all the Eerie/Creepy/Warren characters to create a Vampi universe at DE. Maybe a Rook series with the time traveling hero introduce various Warren characters and then DE could spin off each in their own mini or special? Imagine the Rook meeting Vampi again, Pantha again, the Coffin (zombie western character), the Spook (voodoo character), Dax the Damned (Warren's answer to Conan), the Child (a Frankenstein character), Darklon the Mystic (might be owned solely by Jim Starlin now), Buck & Rick Blaster (from Rook #1), etc. What a great way to launch a new line!
                      Last edited by Blinky McQuade; 10-24-2013, 02:00 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                        They could easily introduce The Rook in a story that crosses over with DE's other time traveler, Miss Fury.

                        But if DE isn't going to publish new adventures of The Rook, could we at least get a hardcover reprint collection of his classic stories from Dark Horse Comics? The Rook appeared in about 20 issues of EERIE before getting his own magazine, which ran for 14 issues, plus one "Warren Presents THE ROOK" special that reprinted his first four stories from EERIE. The Rook's own magazine also had a whole host of ongoing supporting features (Voltar, Joe Guy, Viking Prince, Kronos), one of which (The Goblin), managed to spin off into its own magazine for 3 issues. After THE ROOK was cancelled, he returned to EERIE for 3 additional appearances.

                        Now that I think about it, in addition to Vampirella, Pantha and The Rook, there were a whole bunch of characters who had regular on-and-off series rotating through issues of EERIE or VAMPIRELLA. Frequently these had a sort of tongue-in-cheek humor to them that was very similar to what was going on concurrently in the British SF anthology comic 2000 AD. What can you say about a series called "Rex Havoc and the Asskickers of the Fantastic"? I mean, you hear the title and it either immediately makes you want to read it, or have nothing to do with it. When it proved popular enough with readers to gain it's own "Warren Presents" reprint one-shot, they had to reign themselves back a little and re-title it as "Rex Havoc and the Raiders of the Fantastic" because "Asskickers" was deemed too unmarketable a cover logo for the magazine racks of 1981.

                        Another good question: since DE purchased the characters Vampirella and Pantha (along with associated supporting cast members) from Harris Comics, and Harris Comics also used The Rook, does DE already own the character? The fact that the characters crossed over into each others' respective series during the Warren era, makes me wonder.

                        Wow, we really derailed the Dr. Who thread, didn't we? Sorry about that, Blinky.
                        Not a problem with the derailing! The more I think about it, Dr. Who and other sci fi concepts from tv and movies rarely translates well to comic form. The Dave Gibbons/Pat Mills run of Dr. Who being the exception (check IDW's Gibbons Dr. Who collection or Dr. Who Tabloid comic). The advantage that comics have in science fiction is the almost unlimited budget on special effects (only limit is the artist's ability). With Dr. Who, the writer needs to capture the essence of the actor's portrayal which many times fails. An exception to this theory is the Godzilla comics (IDW, Dark Horse, Marvel) which always were superior to the movies (suspension of belief that that guy in the rubber costume was a monster tearing down buildings).


                        I forgot about Rex Havoc! DE look seriously at expanding your Warren/Vampi line!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Blinky McQuade View Post
                          Not a problem with the derailing! The more I think about it, Dr. Who and other sci fi concepts from tv and movies rarely translates well to comic form. The Dave Gibbons/Pat Mills run of Dr. Who being the exception (check IDW's Gibbons Dr. Who collection or Dr. Who Tabloid comic). The advantage that comics have in science fiction is the almost unlimited budget on special effects (only limit is the artist's ability). With Dr. Who, the writer needs to capture the essence of the actor's portrayal which many times fails. An exception to this theory is the Godzilla comics (IDW, Dark Horse, Marvel) which always were superior to the movies (suspension of belief that that guy in the rubber costume was a monster tearing down buildings).
                          Big Godzilla fan, here. I have to respectfully disagree with that last comment. There is something just 'unauthentic' about Marvel and Dark Horse's Godzilla comics. No slight to Herb Trimpe, but it was "just a job" to him, so there's no attempt to use any film still reference to accurately depict Godzilla's appearance (even if it DID change somewhat from suit to suit). Trimpe had nothing to do with the coloring, so not his fault, but Godzilla is not 'glowing gamma green' like the Hulk. He's more of a dark gray with the slightest green-blueish tinge to him, like some kind of algae you might find growing on rocks at the beach (again, watch the actual films). Godzilla in the Marvel Universe just does NOT work. Even in those relatively sparsely-populated days, there were still any number of Marvel characters who could have taken him down for the count. So who gets to try to contain him? S.H.I.E.L.D. Not their finest moments. One punch from the Hulk or Thor would have done it, though. Kept thinking for sure characters like Ultimo, Living Monolith, IT! the Living Colossus, or even Galactus were going to show up (it's better that they didn't).

                          In Dark Horse's case, the stories were just too "comic-booky" without getting the 'feel' of the actual movies. Not having any of the other monsters from Godzilla's film universe was a major detraction. They usually had great covers, though, and I'll say this about them, at least they got Godzilla himself right.

                          IDW's comics, on the other hand, have been great.

                          But the biggest irony here to me is a guy who's a Dr. Who fan (not the one from the Toho film King Kong Escapes) complaining about the "suspension of belief" of men in rubber costumes. Yeah, none of THAT in Dr. Who! Some of those early 'man-in-a-rubber-suit' Dr. Who monsters make Lost In Space's "The Great Vegetable Rebellion" episode look good.

                          But your analogy here is actually the reverse equivalent of the people who will go see a movie based on a comic book, but won't read the actual comic.

                          Actually, what I'd like to see (curiosity more than anything else) is a reprint of the DALEKS comic strip (a one-pager) that ran in the first year or two of the British weekly TV Century 21 comic. Cohabitating with the likes of Fireball XL5, Stingray, Supercar, The Munsters, and Lady Penelope (for the first year, before Thunderbirds debuted). Yes, you heard right, a strip based solely on the Daleks, that didn't have Dr. Who or any of his supporting cast in it. Just Daleks. Apparently in 1965, Dalekmania ranked just slightly below Beatlemania in England.

                          But enough of that. We now return you to our regular discussion of The Rook, already in progress...
                          Last edited by pulphero; 10-24-2013, 04:28 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                            Big Godzilla fan, here. I have to respectfully disagree with that last comment. There is something just 'unauthentic' about Marvel and Dark Horse's Godzilla comics. No slight to Herb Trimpe, but it was "just a job" to him, so there's no attempt to use any film still reference to accurately depict Godzilla's appearance (even if it DID change somewhat from suit to suit). Trimpe had nothing to do with the coloring, so not his fault, but Godzilla is not 'glowing gamma green' like the Hulk. He's more of a dark gray with the slightest green-blueish tinge to him, like some kind of algae you might find growing on rocks at the beach (again, watch the actual films). Godzilla in the Marvel Universe just does NOT work. Even in those relatively sparsely-populated days, there were still any number of Marvel characters who could have taken him down for the count. So who gets to try to contain him? S.H.I.E.L.D. Not their finest moments. One punch from the Hulk or Thor would have done it, though. Kept thinking for sure characters like Ultimo, Living Monolith, IT! the Living Colossus, or even Galactus were going to show up (it's better that they didn't).

                            In Dark Horse's case, the stories were just too "comic-booky" without getting the 'feel' of the actual movies. Not having any of the other monsters from Godzilla's film universe was a major detraction. They usually had great covers, though, and I'll say this about them, at least they got Godzilla himself right.

                            IDW's comics, on the other hand, have been great.

                            But the biggest irony here to me is a guy who's a Dr. Who fan (not the one from the Toho film King Kong Escapes) complaining about the "suspension of belief" of men in rubber costumes. Yeah, none of THAT in Dr. Who! Some of those early 'man-in-a-rubber-suit' Dr. Who monsters make Lost In Space's "The Great Vegetable Rebellion" episode look good.

                            But your analogy here is actually the reverse equivalent of the people who will go see a movie based on a comic book, but won't read the actual comic.

                            Actually, what I'd like to see (curiosity more than anything else) is a reprint of the DALEKS comic strip (a one-pager) that ran in the first year or two of the British weekly TV Century 21 comic. Cohabitating with the likes of Fireball XL5, Stingray, Supercar, The Munsters, and Lady Penelope (for the first year, before Thunderbirds debuted). Yes, you heard right, a strip based solely on the Daleks, that didn't have Dr. Who or any of his supporting cast in it. Just Daleks. Apparently in 1965, Dalekmania ranked just slightly below Beatlemania in England.

                            But enough of that. We now return you to our regular discussion of The Rook, already in progress...

                            I also believe that Marvel missed the boat when a natural Hulk vs Godzilla would have been awesome.

                            Yes, the old-time Dr. Who episodes had great stories and (at least to me) decent acting, BUT due to lack of any special effects budget from the BBC--it came across as a good high school play (wall on sets wobbly, the rubber costumes, etc). My comment is that in a comic medium the special effects can be "unlimited" but in the case of Dr. Who, comic adaptions or new stories miss the boat mostly due to strained efforts to capture the actor playing the Doctor's personality quirks effectively in comics.

                            I too call for a HC reprint of the DALEKS comic strip run!!! Hey, DE--there is a market for excellent reprints, please consider! My wife accuses me of corrupting our son on a healthy diet of old Dr. Who videos. The Daleks of course work on a lot of kids making them their favorite Dr. Who monster(maybe it is the phallic effect?). One of my son's first words was "Exterminate"--when we went to restaurants with salt and pepper shakers, he would move them across the table uttering the classic word over and over.

                            I look forward to the return of the ROOK, his manservant robot "Manners", and his gun-slinging grandfather Bishop! As well as the return of other great Warren characters from my middle school/high school days! Buying the Warren Magazines was like I was buying a comic that was something adult-oriented as they did not have the Comics Code Authority stamp and had such great covers drawing me to buy Vampirella, Eerie, Creepy, Warren Presents, the Rook, the Goblin, etc. In fact, Marvel's Magazines like Savage Sword of Conan the Barbarian, Deadly Hands of Kung Fu, Doc Savage, Marvel Preview (StarLord), The Hulk (Bloodstone stories and the great Moon Knight stories by Doug Moench), Bizarre Adventures (Kull by Bolton and Moench--my all-time favorite REH comic) and others are great memories.
                            Last edited by Blinky McQuade; 10-25-2013, 08:58 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Blinky McQuade View Post
                              Yes, the old-time Dr. Who episodes had great stories and (at least to me) decent acting, BUT due to lack of any special effects budget from the BBC--it came across as a good high school play (wall on sets wobbly, the rubber costumes, etc).
                              And that's what "suspension of disbelief" is all about. You're a willing collaborator is your own hoodwinking, because (like Agent Mulder) you "WANT to believe". The same applies to men in rubber suits tearing up balsa wood model cites in Japan. Some of the acting in those movies is decent, too. Harder to tell sometimes when the dubbing isn't great. Part of the problem there is with the compromise between trying to do a decent translation, while at the same time making the words fit the original actor's lip movements. At other times, you just have to try to appreciate the 'psychotronic' qualities of those old Japanese films. The wild designs and colors, the frantic action, the 'anything-goes' craziness of it. And your open-ness to these things often depends on the age you first encounter them. I loved all those crazy Gerry Anderson 'Supermarionation' shows as a kid, and even fell in love with the 'swinging' (and highly improbable) purple-wigged moon babes in Anderson's U.F.O. But when it came to Space: 1999 I had to draw the line. Martin Landau and Barbara Bain were good enough for Mission Impossible and in character parts, but didn't have the charisma to be the lead heroes. Beige pants suits?? And having seen the original Star Trek, I knew enough about science by that time to question a shaky premise. "So let me get this straight, the moon is blasted out of earth's orbit and goes zooming off into space?" Right. "At warp speed? ...but somehow, it slows down just enough when it approaches a new planet, for this week's episode to take place?" Pretty much. "Sorry, Gerry, no sale." So there eventually comes a point for each of us where we aren't willing to suspend that disbelief. Today's kids weaned on CGI will look at one of the (to me) great old Ray Harryhausen stop-motion animated movies and say "it looks so fake". I missed seeing Dr. Who as a kid, which is why it's much harder for me to buy into it as an adult - a certain 'window of opportunity' had passed. Another turn-off to me was a hero that was somewhat goofy and eccentric, some might even say flamboyant (this varies in large degree from Dr. to Dr., but I think is a fair generalization). But just when you get used to one, they replace him with another you might like less.

                              Originally posted by Blinky McQuade View Post
                              I look forward to the return of the ROOK, his manservant robot "Manners", and his gun-slinging grandfather Bishop! As well as the return of other great Warren characters from my middle school/high school days! Buying the Warren Magazines was like I was buying a comic that was something adult-oriented as they did not have the Comics Code Authority stamp and had such great covers drawing me to buy Vampirella, Eerie, Creepy, Warren Presents, the Rook, the Goblin, etc. In fact, Marvel's Magazines like Savage Sword of Conan the Barbarian, Deadly Hands of Kung Fu, Doc Savage, Marvel Preview (StarLord), The Hulk (Bloodstone stories and the great Moon Knight stories by Doug Moench), Bizarre Adventures (Kull by Bolton and Moench--my all-time favorite REH comic) and others are great memories.
                              Amen, brother. Nick Barrucci was quoted as saying he loved the magazine version of Doc Savage and would like to reprint it. (In fact, DC already did a trade paperback reprint a few years ago when they had the license.)

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