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Vampirella 12

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  • Vampirella 12

    Another good issue from Nancy & Patrick. Good segue issue. Normally I'm not happy with Vampi out of costume but Patrick made it interesting and just as sexy. It also adds a dimension of reality to see her living more of a normal life - if you can call it that- than she did in the Harris days.

    Speaking of the Harris days, in Revelations it was revealed that Lilith was not her mother but in fact, Draculon was. I got the impression she was sort of a Wonder Woman ball of clay. This explains her great power and resilience. Nancy has given us a new origin and now I wonder if the whole Lady of Shadows arc was to provide another path to her vast superiority over other vampires?

    Vampi's comments about "it's almost dawn" and the observation that she fell into the deathly vampire slumber confused me, however. Is she no longer able to go out during the day? Have I missed something???

  • #2
    I think Nancy and Dynamite are doing away with much of the Harris years hence the grande finale of Vol. 1, Issue 38. Second as for Vampi having problem with problem walking in daylight, I'm not sure since she was walking around that unnamed American city around noon in issue 10 and it was still daylight when to her dad's farm in issue 11, in issue 4 she was sunbathing in Greece, in issue 3 step out of sports car in broad daylight to check in to a resort, etc. So, I have no clue what's going on other than maybe she was up all night and hadn't had sleep?

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    • #3
      Nancy Collins is a great writer and one of my favorites. Patrick draws the best sexiest Vampirella to rival the Warren days. Crisistomo the inker is really good. They are Dynamite's best team.

      I agree Vampirella should always be in her costume. Vampirella is her costume.

      Comic2read

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Comic2read View Post
        Vampirella is her costume.
        What, like Venom? That would be kind of odd. Certainly, her traditional costume is pretty iconic, but if she's well-written, then her costume could occasionally be varied without it being a problem. I think the only problem is when a needless change happens permanently (see: the Man-of-Steel-esque New 52 Superman costume, and generally the costumes of the New 52 overall).

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ChastMastr View Post
          What, like Venom? That would be kind of odd. Certainly, her traditional costume is pretty iconic, but if she's well-written, then her costume could occasionally be varied without it being a problem. I think the only problem is when a needless change happens permanently (see: the Man-of-Steel-esque New 52 Superman costume, and generally the costumes of the New 52 overall).
          Of course he was talking about her costume in the metaphorical sense. The writing can never be iconic, but the artwork can. Since this is comics, a character is as much his or her costume (arguably moreso) than any characterization the writer can supply. A character rises and falls according to how the visual imagery of their costume is embraced or rejected by the audience of comic book consumers. The writing is more about sustaining the potential of the seed planted by the iconic image. It's easy to point to certain characters where this is more true than others, and the iconic imagery is particularly important to characters like Vampirella, Conan, Red Sonja, Doc Savage, Sheena, Tarzan, and on and on, where you can definitely point to strong iconic cover images as being one of, if not THE, major component making the character a success. Yes, all of that would have been wasted if when the reader opens up the book the stories don't deliver... but first the potential audience needs to be persuaded to pick it up. For a business that hinges so crucially on the visual, it always strikes me as strange that someone cannot recognize that a costume (or iconic image) is as important, and likely more important, than anything the writer can supply. Of course this isn't meant to slight the writers. A collection of highly impressive but disconnected images isn't what we want either. I guess what I'm trying to say is what makes comics sexy is what initially attracts our eye and attention, gets our interest and makes us want to know more, not unlike what attracts us to a potential sexual partner. But even beyond that, in the more general sense, there have been psychological studies done about what defines our idea of beauty and how it influences our behavior, especially in relation to advertising and consumerism. Somebody really needs to do a study and write a book about how that applies to comic books and pulp fiction illustration, specifically.

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          • #6
            Pulphero, I agree 100%. Beautifully written essay. I hope Dynamite reads your essay.
            Comic2read

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            • #7
              Yet, Trina Robbins has on more than one occasion complained that during the years artists have taken her original design and stripped away more material to where the final costume in the Harris years was nothing more than "dental floss" (Trina's words). Also, I've noticed that fans who complain that she wears only the monokini in the Warren Era need to go back and take a closer look. I've seen her wear blue jeans with matching jean jacket; a formal, full floor length evening gown, dress slacks and loose neck sweater, bell bottoms, and variety of 70s women's fashion. Yes, she would be wearing the monokini underneath, in superhero style, and she would strip down to metamorphose into a bat to go investigate a case, but she did have other attire.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ddamaged View Post
                Yet, Trina Robbins has on more than one occasion complained that during the years artists have taken her original design and stripped away more material to where the final costume in the Harris years was nothing more than "dental floss" (Trina's words). Also, I've noticed that fans who complain that she wears only the monokini in the Warren Era need to go back and take a closer look. I've seen her wear blue jeans with matching jean jacket; a formal, full floor length evening gown, dress slacks and loose neck sweater, bell bottoms, and variety of 70s women's fashion. Yes, she would be wearing the monokini underneath, in superhero style, and she would strip down to metamorphose into a bat to go investigate a case, but she did have other attire.
                James Warren, Trina, and Frazetta (and Tom Sutton) may have defined the original image of Vampi. But arguably, as the character evolved in the early years and gained a foothold on the readers' imaginations, the real iconic image of the Warren Vampirella could be said to be more of an amalgam of Sanjulian's, Pepe Gonzales', and Enric Torres' imagery.

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                • #9
                  Pulphero is right.
                  Comic2read

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                  • #10
                    Always Be in Her Costume?

                    Originally posted by Comic2read View Post
                    Nancy Collins is a great writer and one of my favorites. Patrick draws the best sexiest Vampirella to rival the Warren days. Crisistomo the inker is really good. They are Dynamite's best team.

                    I agree Vampirella should always be in her costume. Vampirella is her costume.

                    Are you aware that during the Warren Era she wasn't always in her costume?

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                    • #11
                      Of course. I read the Warrens. But Warren intended it temporarily. Not as an attempt to change the costume.
                      Comic2read

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