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  • #31
    Which I shall buy because <3 JAMES ROBINSON <3

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    • #32
      Originally posted by ChastMastr View Post
      Which I shall buy because <3 JAMES ROBINSON <3
      Curious what you thought of AIRBOY... apparently it ruffled someone's feathers.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by pulphero View Post
        Curious what you thought of AIRBOY... apparently it ruffled someone's feathers.
        I have not gotten that one yet--but I have loved all of his DC super-hero stuff and what I have read of his Marvel super-hero stuff (I haven't yet gotten his Secret Wars stuff because I'm honestly just not into zombie stuff or Iron Man Armor Wars etc. stuff, though since it's him I'll probably get it when I can later).

        I know that Airboy is basically a sort of autobiographical story about a very bad period in his life that he's recently come out of, with Airboy in it, rather than a regular Airboy story at all.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by ChastMastr View Post
          Airboy is basically a sort of autobiographical story about a very bad period in his life
          I'm not at all convinced about that. There is some mention of how unhappy he was at DC, and some worry over the idea that his career is washed up, and the mention several times of not having a single idea in his head about a revival of Airboy. That seems to be about the extent of true autobiography in it, as far as I was able to determine.

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          • #35
            Oh, I thought it had a bunch of stuff about the alcoholism and the marriage breaking up as well...?

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            • #36
              He describes the series here as "a semi-autobiographical piece of meta-fiction that shows me at a self-destructive and unhappy time in my life before I sobered up and entered a better place in both my work and the world as a whole. To illustrate this, I portray myself and my artist Greg Hinkle as two blithe idiots pin-balling through a succession of stupid and self-destructive actions, doing and saying stupid and thoughtless things. I intentionally portray myself in the worst light possible and as the worst kind of person."

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              • #37
                Originally posted by ChastMastr View Post
                He describes the series here as "a semi-autobiographical piece of meta-fiction that shows me at a self-destructive and unhappy time in my life before I sobered up and entered a better place in both my work and the world as a whole. To illustrate this, I portray myself and my artist Greg Hinkle as two blithe idiots pin-balling through a succession of stupid and self-destructive actions, doing and saying stupid and thoughtless things. I intentionally portray myself in the worst light possible and as the worst kind of person."
                The drug abuse in the story is a bit over the top to take at face value for a man of Robinson's age... and why bring Hinkle into it if the problems are Robinson's? To be honest, I don't know whether to read this series as some kind of desperate cry for attention, as though Robinson looked at some of the more 'meta'/hallucinogenic kind of stuff Grant Morrison is celebrated for, and cynically said to himself "Well, if he can do it and the readers love him for it, then so can I." A little bit of Morrison 'meta', a heavy dollop of underground/alternative taboo-breaking (possible Garth Ennis influence here as well), and the sort of retro character-revival Robinson is typecast for, and mix them all up in a stew. I'm not feeling a sponteneous/from-the-heart/ring-of-truth quality here; it seems more likely to be the calculated work of veteran pro. I say this because the "real" people in this story seem as unreal if not more so than the fictional characters like Airboy. As characters in this story, Robinson and Hickle come off as something like the Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers.
                Last edited by pulphero; 08-24-2015, 01:18 AM.

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                • #38
                  Generally, I see no reason to assume someone's lying to me unless I have solid evidence for it, so I'm going to accept what he's said in interviews at face value. He's talked about issues with sobriety before, and his ex-wife has mentioned that this seems to bear some resemblance to the very rough time they were going through in the period being fictionalized here.

                  http://goodcomics.comicbookresources...t-3-june-2015/

                  The disturbing part of the comic is that Robinson and Jann Jones, his wife in the comic, are now divorced, and Jones tweeted that it was a painful time in her life (although she also tweeted that she was proud of the work the creators did). Which begs the question: How much of this is real?

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                  • #39
                    And he's definitely talked about working on sobriety, though the video interview link seems to be broken.

                    As for how much of it is fictionalized, he doesn't say, though it's not like he's too old to do things with a whole array of substances (there are some aging rock stars who at this point probably only survive via tanis leaf extract).

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                      The drug abuse in the story is a bit over the top to take at face value for a man of Robinson's age...
                      "A man of Robinson's age"?!? How old is he? (I thought I found a reference to his being born in 1963?)

                      Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                      . . . I say this because the "real" people in this story seem as unreal if not more so than the fictional characters like Airboy. As characters in this story, Robinson and Hickle come off as something like the Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers.
                      I remember them!

                      Click image for larger version

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by ChastMastr View Post
                        And he's definitely talked about working on sobriety, though the video interview link seems to be broken.

                        As for how much of it is fictionalized, he doesn't say, though it's not like he's too old to do things with a whole array of substances (there are some aging rock stars who at this point probably only survive via tanis leaf extract).
                        The drug abuse struck me as comically excessive and blatantly stupid (which doesn't fit my mental picture of Robinson based on reading his prior work), not believeable or realistic for a man in his fifties. (Well, not believable unless the person in question is more or less trying to commit 'accidental suicide', anyway.) I feel like I'm informed about this, since I AM a man in his 50s. It's clear to me that if there was drug abuse in Robinson's recent past, this comic book is wildly exaggerating that for effect. Exactly how exaggerated, I couldn't guess, but if we took the characters in the story at face value, certainly a life expectancy of months at best for a man in his fifties, or quite likely less.

                        I'm reading between the lines here that none of you guys have read the actual comic, so don't go quoting interviews at me when you don't even know what sits on the page here. Nor do I expect to have to read the author's liner notes to review the book based on how it comes across in print. Maybe Robinson was intending an entirely different effect than the way it plays, at least to this reader.

                        Tana leaves -- like in the Universal Monsters MUMMY pictures...?
                        Last edited by pulphero; 08-26-2015, 03:33 PM.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by ChastMastr View Post
                          Generally, I see no reason to assume someone's lying to me unless I have solid evidence for it
                          Well, in the publishing business, they prefer the term "fiction" to "lying", but essentially there's no difference in the technical sense. Unless you're telling me you think Robinson met Airboy at some point in his life, because that's what the story tells us. But you know, this is why people didn't believe Whitley Streiber of Communion fame had a genuine 'alien encounter'... because the man makes a living as a professional fiction writer. Essentially, his career hinges on a talent for making up stories that have some degree of conviction to them. And if you were a skeptical investigator, you have to look to motive. How could it possibly benefit a professional fiction writer to make up stories that weren't true? Oh, that's right, he makes his LIVING doing that, doesn't he? So here's the thing, Whitley Streiber writes a book (like many another book he's written) but says this one's truth, not fiction. Should we believe him? Or is his motivation possibly suspect, since he stands to gain something depending on whether you believe him or don't? Do you feel you need to have "solid evidence" that Whitley Streiber was NOT abducted by aliens/"visitors"/whatever before you find Communion suspect as an autobiographical document/true account?

                          Answer this: If you believe there is a large amount of truth in Robinson's AIRBOY series, does it make you want to read it more than if it were just "pure" fiction? If the answer is "No", then why are we even having this discussion? Is the answer is "Yes", doesn't that explain what Robinson might have to gain by making you believe it's true?
                          Last edited by pulphero; 08-26-2015, 04:07 PM.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
                            Since then, . . .
                            * probably passing on The Shadow #2 and trade-waiting
                            * adding Swords of Sorrow #5
                            Also adding:
                            * Swords of Sorrow Red Sonja & Jungle Girl #3 (of 3)
                            * Swords of Sorrow: Miss Fury / Lady Rawhide Special is no longer just a "possibly"

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                              so don't go quoting interviews at me when you don't even know what sits on the page here.
                              Of course I will; if Robinson's honesty is being called into question, then I will quote what he has said as I like, and I am sorry if you don't like that, but I'll quote whatever I want to if I believe it is warranted.

                              Nor do I expect to have to read the author's liner notes to review the book based on how it comes across in print.
                              If his honesty is being impugned, then his comments in interviews about it are relevant. He's said it's semi-autobiographical, not an exact record of events, especially with a fictional character come to life in the middle of it.

                              Tana leaves -- like in the Universal Monsters MUMMY pictures...?
                              Yes. The person I was thinking of was more or less Keith Richards, who at the age of 71 seems to have done all manner of substances. I do stand corrected re: tana leaves rather than tannis/tanis leaves.

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                                Well, in the publishing business, they prefer the term "fiction" to "lying", but essentially there's no difference in the technical sense.
                                Except when people say things in interviews, which are expected to be honest, rather than something which is expected to be a story.

                                And if you were a skeptical investigator, you have to look to motive.
                                Only once I have concluded that someone is lying. And nowhere has Robinson suggested he met Airboy--he's just said that a lot of his bad, self-destructive behavior in it has some level of truth in it. I see no reason to believe that when he says that, outside of a fictional context, he's lying to all of us.

                                How could it possibly benefit a professional fiction writer to make up stories that weren't true? Oh, that's right, he makes his LIVING doing that, doesn't he?
                                There's a big difference between a story and a lie.

                                So here's the thing, Whitley Streiber writes a book (like many another book he's written) but says this one's truth, not fiction. Should we believe him? Or is his motivation possibly suspect, since he stands to gain something depending on whether you believe him or don't? Do you feel you need to have "solid evidence" that Whitley Streiber was NOT abducted by aliens/"visitors"/whatever before you find Communion suspect as an autobiographical document/true account?
                                I might believe that he's sincere in believing in it; I might not. He could be honestly deluded, after all, and thus not lying, just wrong. (Or it might be true, for all I know; I haven't really read him.) But there is a big difference between someone claiming that they were abducted by aliens and someone saying they had a problem with sobriety during a really messed-up time in their life, and during/after which apparently their marriage broke up.

                                Answer this: If you believe there is a large amount of truth in Robinson's AIRBOY series, does it make you want to read it more than if it were just "pure" fiction? If the answer is "No", then why are we even having this discussion?
                                Because someone's being accused of being a liar? And in addition to that, someone I respect is being accused of being a liar?

                                Is the answer is "Yes", doesn't that explain what Robinson might have to gain by making you believe it's true?
                                Only if it's established that he was deliberately lying. That would be, you know, a really low and rotten thing to do just in general, and I think that's a pretty serious accusation.

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