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PAUL CORNELL talks VAMPIRELLA #0, out February – AND PRICED AT 25 CENTS!!!

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  • PAUL CORNELL talks VAMPIRELLA #0, out February – AND PRICED AT 25 CENTS!!!

    PAUL CORNELL talks VAMPIRELLA #0, on sale in February from Dynamite – AND PRICED AT 25 CENTS!!!

    BYRON BREWER: Paul, you have had experience writing every comic book character from Doctor Who to Lex Luthor to Wolverine. What does it mean to you to begin a new chapter in the career of a character as iconic as Vampirella for Dynamite?

    PAUL CORNELL: It’s lovely to take on a character with such a long history and so many portrayals.

    BB: Vampirella has been portrayed as everything from cheesecake to a skilled monster hunter. How do you see this character as a writer?

    PAUL: In our run, she’s a bit of an everywoman, a relatable character lost in a terrible world. That’s not a first for her, really, but I like the chance to put the audience onside with her, inside her head.

    BB: You've said that while you will not ignore the character's past continuity, Vampirella under your pen will be headed for a new world where "the gothic meets science fiction." Tell us more about that.

    PAUL: I think some characters have just been rebooted too much, so we’re not going to do that. We’re going to forge ahead. She’s the gothic, and the shape she brings is the snake in the garden, the ancient revenge, and the SF is the dystopian world she wakes up in.


    BB: When Vampirella takes her first nourishing drink of blood in your issue #0, she notices something has changed about humans. Or at least the humans she first encounters. Can you tell us anything about that at this point?

    PAUL: They have a new sort of blood, which is to do with the set-up of the world, the way the bargain between life and death has been altered. It’s very tasty, mind you.

    BB: What is it like to be reunited with your frequent collaborator, artist Jimmy Broxton? Tell us what his art will bring to this new volume of Vampirella.

    PAUL: He’s got this classy, European style going now, which so plays to both the origins of the character, in black and white magazine art, and to the kind of subtle, sophisticated look we want to give her now. I keep saying Modesty Blaise, and Jimmy seems to enjoy that.

    BB: What can you tell us about any new characters that will play an important role in Vampirella's new life? Did you collaborate with Jimmy on their designs?

    PAUL: Well, I make suggestions in the script. Vampirella will have three companions on this journey, two innocents she stumbles across and a cat she calls Grit. We all like the cat. We want Grit action figures.

    BB: Vampirella has been reinvented and relauched numerous times, yet has never lost her energy or appeal as a character. With this new iteration, what is the greatest challenge you face with both diehard fans and new readers?

    PAUL: To do something radically new and bring in new readers. To push nostalgia away as always, because nostalgia is the waiting room for death.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Byron View Post

    BB: Vampirella has been reinvented and relauched numerous times, yet has never lost her energy or appeal as a character. With this new iteration, what is the greatest challenge you face with both diehard fans and new readers?

    PAUL: To do something radically new and bring in new readers. To push nostalgia away as always, because nostalgia is the waiting room for death.
    Then why even use these characters? Don't want nostalgia? Create something new.

    Comment


    • #3
      It's the conceit that new = better. That worked so well with the last relaunch that Simone masterminded that they went and did it again. Nostalgia is the waiting room of death? Maybe Dynamite should consider getting some writers that can approach the characters without denigrating their past.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Ajax View Post
        It's the conceit that new = better. That worked so well with the last relaunch that Simone masterminded that they went and did it again. Nostalgia is the waiting room of death? Maybe Dynamite should consider getting some writers that can approach the characters without denigrating their past.
        I agree with him only in the context of having the character constantly doing the same damn thing over and over. If you keep telling the same story, it'll invariably get stale.
        Like, you know, having Red Sonja battle Kulan Gath.

        I think there's an incorrect perception that those of us who feel nostalgia are opposed to character evolution, and that's not the case. It's probably a bit more accurate to say that we prefer it to be a bit more gradual.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
          I agree with him only in the context of having the character constantly doing the same damn thing over and over. If you keep telling the same story, it'll invariably get stale.
          Like, you know, having Red Sonja battle Kulan Gath.

          I think there's an incorrect perception that those of us who feel nostalgia are opposed to character evolution, and that's not the case. It's probably a bit more accurate to say that we prefer it to be a bit more gradual.
          Yes, and make the changes come from character growth inherent in the character's background. Take Simone's penultimate Red Sonja arc where she supposedly learns the value of forgiveness. The story has the problem develop out of a curse put on her by a wizard. During the story she runs into a guy who had been part of the mercenaries who destroyed her village growing up. He makes only a few appearances in the story and gets forgiven by Sonja in the end because she no longer had the wizard's curse making her unforgiving. Not sure what lesson she was supposed to learn since the unforgiving kill anything that pissed her off plot monkey was a curse put on her rather than her own nature.

          Had Simone, instead, let Sonja become friends with the guy, save each other at the outset only for Sonja to either recall who he was later or him reveal it over a drunken conversation in a tavern that would have the basis of character driven growth. Instead, we got a plot driven piece of drivel which Simone seemed to have forgotten in her two issue end tale where she beats a guy to death for being a jerk about how he warns her of enemies coming to kill her.

          Simone's whole time on Red Sonja was a host of plot driven character choices like that or wholesale changes in Sonja's characterization that came out of the blue for the sake of her plot. Cornell says early in the interview:
          I think some characters have just been rebooted too much, so we’re not going to do that. We’re going to forge ahead.
          Sounds like you can't be overly afraid of the character's past if you're not thinking of rebooting. And Vampirella has had more rebooting madness than you can shake a stick at. More important is, as you say, don't be stale in the story telling. Wizards cursing folks like Simone's story mentioned above are all too common in Sonja's books, and Kulan Gath is similarly overused. Let a writer make a story that uses the character's past to be something to challenge them and overcome like making the mercenary in that Simone story a friend that Sonja has to deal with her demons as the enemy to overcome and learn the value of forgiveness instead of yet another wizard did it tale.
          Last edited by Ajax; 12-09-2016, 03:18 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Byron View Post
            BB: Vampirella has been reinvented and relauched numerous times, yet has never lost her energy or appeal as a character. With this new iteration, what is the greatest challenge you face with both diehard fans and new readers?
            PAUL: To do something radically new and bring in new readers. To push nostalgia away as always, because nostalgia is the waiting room for death.
            And where are all those reinvented and relaunched versions of Vampirella now? Manga Vampi, and the rest? Gone and forgotten, and if they'd been accepted as the "new and improved" product you claim, then they'd still be with us. Sure you can push nostalgia away. Just go ahead and invent NEW characters for those NEW readers. The old readers WANT the old familiar versions. If the consumer market demands gloves, you don't take a shoe and try to re-engineer it into a glove. You just make a better glove than someone else.

            Well, DE spent money to acquire the Vampirella name, so they have to try to make some money off the brand, and re-tool it into something that will sell to the current crop of comic shop consumers. But it seems to me that the marketplace isn't buying all these reinventions, since none of them has any staying power.

            Nostalgia may be "the waiting room for death", but it seems to me that companies like Dynamite and IDW are pretty heavily invested in nostalgia as their stock in trade. Why else would those companies be publishing characters like Betty Boop and Popeye? The Shadow and Green Hornet? G.I. Joe and Transformers?

            And you know what? We're ALL gonna die. Sorry to break it to you. That goes for Byron Brewer, Paul Cornell, and positronic, too. Yup, even someday Vampirella. Someday she'll go to join Chester Gump and Buster Brown in the obsolete comic character afterlife. (But hey, it's never too late to reboot Buster Brown as the All-Different All-Savage NEW Buster Brown!) Admit it or don't, but we are all just passing the time in that Big ol' Waiting Room before it comes, and everyone in that waiting room still needs to be entertained, and there's still some that enjoy the characters they liked when they were younger.
            Last edited by positronic; 12-09-2016, 06:56 AM.
            DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by positronic View Post
              Nostalgia may be "the waiting room for death", but it seems to me that companies like Dynamite and IDW are pretty heavily invested in nostalgia as their stock in trade. Why else would those companies be publishing characters like Betty Boop and Popeye? The Shadow and Green Hornet? G.I. Joe and Transformers?
              What made it even more hilarious is they started using that nostalgia quote right before dropping the news for Barbarella comics. It's a desperate way of shaming classic Vampi because calling her fans and creators sexist doesn't work anymore. Now they're going to waste another publishing year on yet another social justice version of her doomed to fail chasing those ever-elusive readers that just aren't buying it: literally and figuratively.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Leadpoison View Post
                (...)those ever-elusive readers that just aren't buying it: literally and figuratively.
                Well, I'm buying it. (Not the kitty action figure, though. Over my blood-drained body.)
                Can't bitch about it otherwise, right?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by shokoshu View Post
                  Well, I'm buying it. (Not the kitty action figure, though. Over my blood-drained body.)
                  Can't bitch about it otherwise, right?
                  Do let us know what you think. Maybe we'll all be pleasantly surprised.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by positronic View Post
                    And where are all those reinvented and relaunched versions of Vampirella now? Manga Vampi, and the rest? Gone and forgotten, and if they'd been accepted as the "new and improved" product you claim, then they'd still be with us. Sure you can push nostalgia away. Just go ahead and invent NEW characters for those NEW readers. The old readers WANT the old familiar versions. If the consumer market demands gloves, you don't take a shoe and try to re-engineer it into a glove. You just make a better glove than someone else.

                    Well, DE spent money to acquire the Vampirella name, so they have to try to make some money off the brand, and re-tool it into something that will sell to the current crop of comic shop consumers. But it seems to me that the marketplace isn't buying all these reinventions, since none of them has any staying power.

                    Nostalgia may be "the waiting room for death", but it seems to me that companies like Dynamite and IDW are pretty heavily invested in nostalgia as their stock in trade. Why else would those companies be publishing characters like Betty Boop and Popeye? The Shadow and Green Hornet? G.I. Joe and Transformers?

                    And you know what? We're ALL gonna die. Sorry to break it to you. That goes for Byron Brewer, Paul Cornell, and positronic, too. Yup, even someday Vampirella. Someday she'll go to join Chester Gump and Buster Brown in the obsolete comic character afterlife. (But hey, it's never too late to reboot Buster Brown as the All-Different All-Savage NEW Buster Brown!) Admit it or don't, but we are all just passing the time in that Big ol' Waiting Room before it comes, and everyone in that waiting room still needs to be entertained, and there's still some that enjoy the characters they liked when they were younger.
                    agreed. hell, most of Dynamite's comics are keyed into the nostalgia factor. i'll check out this new series because i love Vampirella, but creators should stop trying to make us old fans feel bad for liking the original, scantily clad Vampi.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      From a follow-up thread where Paul Cornell talked about VAMPIRELLA #1:
                      BYRON BREWER: Paul, tell us about the new spin you are putting on Vampirella. How do you handle such an iconic character for the vaunted new reader and yet keep those legions of core fans happy?

                      PAUL CORNELL: Making her true to herself kind of does both. Also, we’re saying all previous versions are true, so nobody needs to feel they’ve been rebooted out of the audience.

                      BB: What can you tell us about Vampirella’s long, long sleep (is there a cause we will be learning about as this iteration of the book moves forward) and the world she is occupying now?

                      PC: You’ll be learning about why she’s slept so long, but perhaps not in this first story in our new setting. It’s a mystery we’d like to maintain for a while. She doesn’t know what’s happened. The world she’s in now is a future utopia/dystopia (six of one…) where a lot of people are very happy, and then there’s the annoying other people.
                      That seems to put a whole new spin on what he said above, dissing 'nostalgia'. At any rate, I did read the #0 issue, and what I read was not bad. More of a prologue, actually, but the story takes place 1000 years in the future, so you could put this down as a "possible future" Vampirella story. This type of story does not bother me as a standalone limited series. (How do I know it's limited? Get real, this is Dynamite we're talking about - everything is limited.) Vampirella's tomb is found and a couple sacrifices their own blood willingly to resurrect Vampirella. Vampirella finds a book that depicts some of her conflicting past incarnations and origin stories, and she senses that the Earth is different now, and "reality has changed". So at least Cornell is acknowledging what went before. Jimmy Broxton's art is very good. I plan to read issue #1 to see where Cornell is going with this. Maybe I'll like it or maybe I won't, but I'm already left with the impression that this is not intended as any sort of permanent new direction for Vampirella. I can live with that.
                      Last edited by positronic; 02-03-2017, 01:51 AM.
                      DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Leadpoison View Post
                        What made it even more hilarious is they started using that nostalgia quote right before dropping the news for Barbarella comics. It's a desperate way of shaming classic Vampi because calling her fans and creators sexist doesn't work anymore. Now they're going to waste another publishing year on yet another social justice version of her doomed to fail chasing those ever-elusive readers that just aren't buying it: literally and figuratively.
                        Hey, Leadpoison, I'm curious. Do you produce a body of fan art of superheroines being beaten and raped?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          This has nothing to do with the current discussion. (Does it? ;-)

                          https://www.bleedingcool.com/2017/02...s-made-result/
                          https://www.bleedingcool.com/2017/02...broxton-again/

                          Let the flamewars begin...or even better, don't.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Eh, one of the posters on BC put it well by saying essentially this was making a mountain out of a mole hill on all sides. It's a great pastiche cover with one line that one side makes sound the end of civilization. Broxton could have apologized and changed it, don't have to mean it, just say it. The whole outrage business will make the cover more noticed than if it had been ignored so for those that hate the thing, well, good job giving this cover more notice.
                            Broxton's art on the book looked great, shame dynamite and Cornell dropped him so hard.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Ajax View Post
                              Broxton could have apologized and changed it, don't have to mean it, just say it.
                              Personally, I'm glad he refused to. I wish it had just been put down as a difference of opinion and left at that though. To say you'll never work with someone ever again over this is a little over the top.

                              Comment

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