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  • Bettie Page is tops!

    G'day,

    Just read Bettie Page #1 and loved it. David Avallone and Calton Worley have done their homework, the book reads and feels like a 1950's story. Great fun book , but before you read it, google "Jack Parsons rocket scientist occult" if you don't know who Jack Parsons was. I'm half expecting L Ron hubbard to make an appearance. Its a hoot.

    ta

    Ralph

  • #2
    It's a disappointment on one level though, as my expectation (which I think is reasonable, and probably shared by many potential buyers) was that any comic focusing on Bettie Page as the main attraction would feature "good girl art". That's not to say that Colton Worley's art is bad. It isn't. But neither is it the sort of art that showcases a pinup/cheesecake approach -- in other words, "good GIRL art" as opposed to merely "good art" -- with a lot of poses focusing on Bettie's shapely figure... call them gratuitous if you must, but why else do a Bettie Page comic book in the first place? Certainly previous Bettie Page comic books took exactly that approach.

    I feel about the same as I would buying a cheesecake only to discover that it does not, in point of fact, contain any cheese whatsoever. Sure you can argue that cheesecake is totally bad for you, and you oughtn't to even consider eating such a thing. I won't be continuing with the comic book.
    Last edited by pulphero; 07-20-2017, 12:21 PM.

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    • #3
      G'day,

      I was just hoping for a good period story with a pretty girl in it. Frankly good girl art is much more common then good story telling.
      DE has had some complete stuff ups here with artist who have no idea of the period. This book avoided that problem and the historical stuff made it so much fun.

      ta

      Ralph

      Originally posted by pulphero View Post
      It's a disappointment on one level though, as my expectation (which I think is reasonable, and probably shared by many potential buyers) was that any comic focusing on Bettie Page as the main attraction would feature "good girl art". That's not to say that Colton Worley's art is bad. It isn't. But neither is it the sort of art that showcases a pinup/cheesecake approach -- in other words, "good GIRL art" as opposed to merely "good art" -- with a lot of poses focusing on Bettie's shapely figure... call them gratuitous if you must, but why else do a Bettie Page comic book in the first place? Certainly previous Bettie Page comic books took exactly that approach.

      I feel about the same as I would buying a cheesecake only to discover that it does not, in point of fact, contain any cheese whatsoever. Sure you can argue that cheesecake is totally bad for you, and you oughtn't to even consider eating such a thing. I won't be continuing with the comic book.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by ralphuniverse View Post
        I was just hoping for a good period story with a pretty girl in it. Frankly good girl art is much more common then good story telling.
        DE has had some complete stuff ups here with artist who have no idea of the period. This book avoided that problem and the historical stuff made it so much fun.
        Worley's art did a great job of capturing the period flavor, but it's BETTIE PAGE! What else would I expect but good girl art? She's the Pin-Up Queen, the Cleopatra of Cheesecake. That's what's she's famous for, not for being a "historical figure" (no pun intended) or a pulp-fictional heroine. It's such a no-brainer that it never occurred to me that it could possibly NOT be present in this story. DE has given us hundreds of good girl art comic books (and 5 times as many good girl art covers), so that should have been taken as a "given". Colton Worley's art is appropriately noir-ish, but it's no coincidence that the early 1950s also represents the period most associated with the traditional "good girl art" comic books, so there's an expectation that any Bettie Page comic would also be evocative of the comics of that period, which Worley's art (while very good by modern comic art sensibilities) does not homage. If it sounds like I'm knocking Worley simply for his own style, I'm not. I have no reason to believe that he isn't talented enough to provide good girl art, but I suspect he's being art-directed not to pursue that angle for this series.

        The good girl art aspect should be the very simplest part of the premise to accomplish... unless they're consciously trying to avoid offending any potential female readers. YES, please give us an authentic period flavor and a fun and well-written story to go along with it, and then you'll have an A+ Bettie Page comic book. There's just no avoiding a comparison with Dark Horse's Bettie Page comics of the 1990s by Jim Silke (not to mention the dearly-departed and uber-talented Dave Stevens, the man most responsible for Bettie Page comic books, even if he never drew an "authorized" one in his career). Frankly, it falls short.

        The fact is that a non-good girl art BETTIE PAGE comic story sticks out like a sore thumb as an obvious attempt at "avoiding sexism" (also taken in light of DE's recent "girl power" revamps of Red Sonja, Vampirella, and Dejah Thoris) and strikes me as the most blatant hypocrisy, especially when they're goosing sales with multiple variant covers that are blatantly exploitative of that very angle (not a complaint in itself, since that's a long-accepted standard DE practice). So why be dishonest about the main attraction of a BP comic with the interior artwork?
        Last edited by positronic; 07-21-2017, 07:28 AM.
        DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

        Comment


        • #5
          G'day,

          Look, I know Bettie is a pinup girl and I have no problems with Cheescake art but I will admit not to be familiar with her previous comics, so when was the last series? The 1990's? I don't know, perhaps DE wants to bypass their senior citizens readers.

          ta

          Ralph


          Originally posted by positronic View Post
          Worley's art did a great job of capturing the period flavor, but it's BETTIE PAGE! What else would I expect but good girl art? She's the Pin-Up Queen, the Cleopatra of Cheesecake. That's what's she's famous for, not for being a "historical figure" (no pun intended) or a pulp-fictional heroine. It's such a no-brainer that it never occurred to me that it could possibly NOT be present in this story. DE has given us hundreds of good girl art comic books (and 5 times as many good girl art covers), so that should have been taken as a "given". Colton Worley's art is appropriately noir-ish, but it's no coincidence that the early 1950s also represents the period most associated with the traditional "good girl art" comic books, so there's an expectation that any Bettie Page comic would also be evocative of the comics of that period, which Worley's art (while very good by modern comic art sensibilities) does not homage. If it sounds like I'm knocking Worley simply for his own style, I'm not. I have no reason to believe that he isn't talented enough to provide good girl art, but I suspect he's being art-directed not to pursue that angle for this series.

          The good girl art aspect should be the very simplest part of the premise to accomplish... unless they're consciously trying to avoid offending any potential female readers. YES, please give us an authentic period flavor and a fun and well-written story to go along with it, and then you'll have an A+ Bettie Page comic book. There's just no avoiding a comparison with Dark Horse's Bettie Page comics of the 1990s by Jim Silke (not to mention the dearly-departed and uber-talented Dave Stevens, the man most responsible for Bettie Page comic books, even if he never drew an "authorized" one in his career). Frankly, it falls short.

          The fact is that a non-good girl art BETTIE PAGE comic story sticks out like a sore thumb as an obvious attempt at "avoiding sexism" (also taken in light of DE's recent "girl power" revamps of Red Sonja, Vampirella, and Dejah Thoris) and strikes me as the most blatant hypocrisy, especially when they're goosing sales with multiple variant covers that are blatantly exploitative of that very angle (not a complaint in itself, since that's a long-accepted standard DE practice). So why be dishonest about the main attraction of a BP comic with the interior artwork?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by ralphuniverse View Post
            Look, I know Bettie is a pinup girl and I have no problems with Cheescake art but I will admit not to be familiar with her previous comics, so when was the last series? The 1990's? I don't know, perhaps DE wants to bypass their senior citizens readers.
            You don't have to be as old as Bettie Page to have read comics published in the late 1990s. If Nick isn't making comics for himself, maybe he should stop licensing properties as old as he is, if not 30 years older.

            It would probably be a bad idea for DE to think they could get by on just an audience of under-40 readers, considering the bulk of its ongoing characters, most of which date from being created in the early 1930s (or earlier, like ERB properties and Zorro) to the early 1970s, but which haven't had a lot of publishing continuity in between that time. I think that just leaves Grumpy Cat, Boo the World's Cutest Dog, Bob's Burgers and a few creator-owned series. It's fine for Marvel & DC's characters, who have appeared in their comics either continuously or off-and-on-again for 80 to 50 years, picking up new readers with each new iteration. Dynamite's ongoing characters probably have the highest median age of any publisher's in the comics industry, and if I had to take a wild guess, the highest median age in reader demographics; yet if you had to add up the actual number of comic book appearances of those same characters, it would be among the smallest of any publisher's stable. Spawn, The Savage Dragon and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles have each appeared in more comic books than Red Sonja, Vampirella, The Green Hornet and The Shadow, to name four of DE's top properties.
            Last edited by positronic; 07-22-2017, 01:55 AM.
            DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

            Comment

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