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A Brief History Of The Lone Ranger

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Tommy



    Welcome aboard, David! Thanks for the material you've provided above! Many new readers may have little knowledge of the Ranger's origins, and exerpts like these are very helpful!

    Again, welcome to the forums David. Perhaps you'd like to share with us your ideas on where you'd like to see the comic headed?


    Tommy.
    .

    Okay, well, I only just found out about this comic when I saw it listed as CBG's Indy Pick of the Month a few days ago in their Indy Reviews section. I know artist Sergio Cariello as a devout born-again Christian, and I'm in his corner as far as his career is concerned. That he was involved and that it was a CBG Pick is what led me to look further.

    I collect the Dell Lone Ranger comics, but not for the Lone Ranger stories. I collect them for the Young Hawk native American back-up feature which was written by devout born-again Christian writer Gaylord Du Bois (who also wrote all of Dell's Hi-Yo Silver series; which, incidently, was nicely drawn by Tom Gill who just died a few months back; did he also draw The Lone Ranger?).

    I was just looking at Sergio Cariello's Lone Ranger pages online, and I couldn't get into it. The colorist is 'way too European -style for me. Black borders and gutters. Too rich / florid / dark / painterly.

    My old eyes want white gutters with black-line border panels, and soft-light 4-color coloring.

    1994's The Shadow starring Alec Baldwin was difficult for me to watch because it was so visually dark.

    Visually dark stuff is hard on my eyes. It is difficult to follow.

    My eyes prefer daylight, visually bright, light colors.

    Florid coloring hurts my eyes. The dazzle! Oh, Lord! The dazzle!

    (Wasn't there a terrible-selling Marvel super-hero who used *dazzle* as a means of fighting bad guys?)

    And painterly coloring? It's very European. I know the website says in the initial write-up of the talent that this was precisely why the colorist was chosen. "Painterly" hurts my eyes.

    (My eyes are sensitive. "Red-letter" editions of The Holy Bible in which Jesus's words are in red ink -- that hurts my eyes. Red ink hurts my eyes. And I am not the only one. A lot of people respond to red ink that way. My God, man! Why can't they use green ink!? Would it kill them? They USED TO use green ink, and blue, also, before The Great War, when those colors were conscripted, and a civilian shortage made all highlighted Bibles go red.)

    So, I wish Sergio success. I hope this is a big critical hit, and everything. But, as Will Eisner pointed out, comics is a literary medium -- words and pictures that communicate together, and are "read." I can't get past the coloring and black-border pages.

    Plus, I really prefer maudlin over clever, hoaky over gritty, corny over violent, light over dark.

    Moreover, everything I've read about it, so far, indicates it is a 6-issue intro-story arc. Nothing suggests each issue is a "Done in One." Maybe there'll be a TP that I can pick up on sale for five bucks in a few years.

    I know you folks say you are writing for older readers, but I think I am a little TOO old for this comics style. I gave Rising Stars a complete try a few years ago, all the way. I ended up being totally turned off by Joe Straczynski's hate-filled PC pamphleteering writing (well, hateful of religious morality, anyway, and of political conservatism; did he think his spin would NOT hinder entertainment value?). And the painterly coloring made it all the more of a shudder-fest for me.

    I rarely buy contemporary comics. As a long-time Max Allan Collins fan, I buy whatever he writes. His CSI stuff, for comics, lately. I hate the painterly coloring, there, and the dark look of it. For my eyes, less is more. Give me simple soft-bright-light colors. Not painterly. Single values. I still like Archie coloring. And Disney coloring. And a simple, clear look to the pictures.

    So, God bless you, and be well.
    Last edited by David_Porta; 12-02-2006, 03:47 AM. Reason: wrong word

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    • #17
      Originally posted by David_Porta
      I collect the Dell Lone Ranger comics, but not for the Lone Ranger stories. I collect them for the Young Hawk native American back-up feature which was written by devout born-again Christian writer Gaylord Du Bois (who also wrote all of Dell's Hi-Yo Silver series; which, incidently, was nicely drawn by Tom Gill who just died a few months back; did he also draw The Lone Ranger?)
      Yes, Tom Gill was best know as a Lone Ranger cartoonist. His memoir, published posthumously, is now for sale. You can find out about it here: www.fivestarpublications.com/loneranger/.

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      • #18
        I recognize DuBois's name from Mr. Porta's research on Turok (perhaps the one of the best Native American characters in modern comics). I know its off topic but would anyone hapen to know of the writer of a strip called "Red Men" I have been trying to find it on the web and come up blank every time. oh and by the way did anyone notice that a Lone ranger novel shows up in Road to Perdition. I wonder if that was some kind of homage or soething.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by tonto
          oh and by the way did anyone notice that a Lone ranger novel shows up in Road to Perdition. I wonder if that was some kind of homage or soething.
          Yes, my friend Leonard Maltin (OK, so I'm name dropping ) pointed out that the movie takes place before the Lone Ranger was created. It's one of those elements out of time.

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          • #20
            Maltin huh very cool Kemo Sabe. I remember in Seabiscuit there is a scene with a Flash Gordon book in it a few years before the novelizations began. I just pick up on weird stuff like that sorry guess I better tuck my geekiness back in.

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            • #21
              the origin story

              Many do not know that the origin of the lone ranger was not part of the original scripts. it was developed over a decade or so by various creators. the book "From out of the Past" by Dave Holland covers this development and is a fascinating read.
              i did up a website with an excerpt from this book covering the above. click here to go to it:

              http://mysite.verizon.net/cdautle/fop/index.htm

              sorry about the size of the pages: it would not be readable otherwise. ditto the loading time on some of the photos.
              the chapter continues after this excerpt with parts of the original radio script wherein President Grant speaks to female operative about origin.
              CindyR

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Lone Ranger
                The Jan. 30, 1933, date is more lore than fact. If you read David Holland's "From Out of the Past: A Pictorial History of the Lone Ranger," you will see that the first official broadcast was Feb. 2, 1933. However, there was a test broadcast late at night on Jan. 20, 1933, for the benefit of potential advertisers. So, depending on what you believe, there are three possible dates for the first broadcast.
                I may be able to help with this.

                In writing my superhero novels set in the 1950s, I did some research on TV programs. The East Coast, West Coast and Middle (what I call the REAL Midwestern state s-- utah through nebraska), TV stations and air dates varied considerably. This was due to different market tests. The East Coast would get some TV shows earlier depending on the production crew and market analysis. The West Coast -- same deal. The middle states were usually considered the mainstream, and their neilsons were largely ignored by the book end markets. Therefore these markets could get their tapes a day late and thus the show would then be delayed for a week (it happened more often than you'd expect).

                I have to watch myself specifically whenever I reference a TV show, to a point where I have to look up the newspaper schedule from what's stored on file at the library. In fact, the Lone Ranger schedule for the Denver area has proven to be bothersome for me. I was unable to find a proper Denver tv schedule for the last week of march in 1953 when I finished with my first book, and dread going to the library again to scour for the TV schdule for my second book. I did find a Chicago schedule online once.


                As for the episode count... weren't radio serials marked like the old Doctor Who episodes? You know where one story arc would actually cover about 3 10-15 minute copyrighted episodes?

                I remember that The Shadow Radio Drama wound up doing that a few times. So that could easily explain the episode count, especially if multiple episodes made for a complete story arc.
                Last edited by Kevin; 04-08-2007, 02:07 AM.

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                • #23
                  NPR article

                  Click below to be taken to an arrticle in NPR's "All things considered" for a rather decent article on the team.

                  http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...41&ft=1&f=1008

                  CindyR

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                  • #24
                    Klinton Spillsbury

                    The Klinton Spillsbury was okay. The one thing I liked that they had the mask being from his brothers vest and the eye holes started out as the bullet holes that killed him.
                    Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
                    Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
                    http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

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                    • #25
                      So does Dynamite own the rights? Or are they leasing the rights to publish? And who owns the rights?

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                      • #26
                        Classic Media/Entertainment Rights owns the rights to the Lone Ranger. Dynamite is licensing the property.
                        DECODER RING THEATRE
                        EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS
                        PROJECT SUPERPOWERS DATABASE
                        PUBLIC DOMAIN SUPER HEROES

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Ghornet2
                          The Klinton Spillsbury was okay. The one thing I liked that they had the mask being from his brothers vest and the eye holes started out as the bullet holes that killed him.
                          Your memory must be playing tricks on you. In Legend of the Lone Ranger, they never said where his mask came from.

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                          • #28
                            Jim Nixon interview

                            If you want to hear a great audio interview on the origins of the Lone Ranger, listen to this interview with Lone Ranger historian Jim Nixon. Jim Nixon interview. Note, it is 72 minutes long.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Lone Ranger
                              Your memory must be playing tricks on you. In Legend of the Lone Ranger, they never said where his mask came from.
                              I definitely remember the mask being from his brother's vest. I'll have to watch the movie agian. It could also be from the novelization of the movie. I think I still have the book.
                              Last edited by Ghornet2; 03-13-2008, 12:25 PM.
                              Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
                              Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
                              http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                The weekly Scoop newsletter has an article on the history of the Lone Ranger today.

                                Scoop's 75 Years of the Lone Ranger
                                DECODER RING THEATRE
                                EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS
                                PROJECT SUPERPOWERS DATABASE
                                PUBLIC DOMAIN SUPER HEROES

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