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A Brief History Of The Lone Ranger

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  • #31
    Mask from the vest

    Originally posted by Lone Ranger
    Your memory must be playing tricks on you. In Legend of the Lone Ranger, they never said where his mask came from.
    I finally got around to re reading the novelization of the movie.

    It definitly says that the Lone Ranger's mask was made from his brother's vest and that the eye holes were from the two bullets that killed him. He and Tonto never said it so it either wasn't ovious in the movie or was added by Gary Mccarthy who did the novelization.

    I think its a nice if slightly morbid touch.
    Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
    Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
    http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

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    • #32
      eyeholes

      thanks for checking that out. i've been a fan since i was six andi had never heard of it before the comic writer mentioned it. i wondered where it came from.

      i agree: good if morbid touch.

      cindy



      Originally posted by Ghornet2
      I finally got around to re reading the novelization of the movie.

      It definitly says that the Lone Ranger's mask was made from his brother's vest and that the eye holes were from the two bullets that killed him. He and Tonto never said it so it either wasn't ovious in the movie or was added by Gary Mccarthy who did the novelization.

      I think its a nice if slightly morbid touch.

      Comment


      • #33
        The bullet holes for eyes have almost always been part of Lone Ranger lore. It just wasn't used in the Legend of the Lone Ranger movie.

        Comment


        • #34
          bullet holes

          do you have a reference? I cannot find one predating the novelilzation previously mentioned.
          cindy

          Originally posted by Lone Ranger
          The bullet holes for eyes have almost always been part of Lone Ranger lore. It just wasn't used in the Legend of the Lone Ranger movie.

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          • #35
            Clayton Moore referenced it when speaking to the governor in "The Lone Ranger" movie.

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            • #36
              vest

              Are you sure? I only recall him saying that the mask was made from his brother's vest. there was no mention of the bulletholes for eyes thing. (?)
              cindy

              Originally posted by Lone Ranger
              Clayton Moore referenced it when speaking to the governor in "The Lone Ranger" movie.

              Comment


              • #37
                What a great thread!!! I'm really enjoying finding out a few things that I never knew about the Lone Ranger. Keep it up!

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                • #38
                  Lone Ranger & Green Hornet

                  I know that the Hornet is the great nephew of the Ranger, his father is Dan Ried the Ranger's nephew. I also know taht this wasn't always the case. When did they actually connect the two and when did we learn that the Ranger's name was Reid?
                  Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
                  Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
                  http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

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                  • #39
                    green hornet

                    you might ask this one over on the CAVE forum. i believe it was already answered but cannot recall the details.
                    cindy

                    Originally posted by Ghornet2
                    I know that the Hornet is the great nephew of the Ranger, his father is Dan Ried the Ranger's nephew. I also know taht this wasn't always the case. When did they actually connect the two and when did we learn that the Ranger's name was Reid?

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      It looks like 1947 is when it was confirmed that the Ranger and the Hornet were related. The Hornet started in 1936, I'm not sure if the Ranger's name was Reid before that or not. I'll have to do some digging...

                      Originally posted by Wikipedia
                      Britt Reid is a blood relative of The Lone Ranger. The character of Dan Reid, who appeared on the Lone Ranger program as the Masked Man's nephew, was also featured on the Green Hornet as Britt Reid's father, making the Green Hornet the grand-nephew of the Lone Ranger. Confirming this was the November 11, 1947 radio show episode "Too Hot To Handle": After his secret identity was uncovered in a previous episode, "Exposed" (broadcast October 28, 1947), by Linda Travers, a novice reporter secretly hired by Britt's father to check up on him, Britt told his father Dan that he was the masked Green Hornet. After his initial shock and anger, Dan Reid referred to a "pioneer ancestor" of Britt's that he himself had rode alongside with in Texas, a man who rode a horse and acted as a vigilante, and expressed his pride in and love for his son. As he explained this, the Lone Ranger theme briefly played in the background.
                      DECODER RING THEATRE
                      EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS
                      PROJECT SUPERPOWERS DATABASE
                      PUBLIC DOMAIN SUPER HEROES

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                      • #41
                        A old promo

                        I thought everybody might enjoy seeing this.

                        As I understand The Ranger is actually Brace Beemer, who often made public appearances as The Ranger even before he was the voice of The Ranger.
                        Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
                        Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
                        http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

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                        • #42
                          Are the Heroic Characters of the '30s Still Viable?

                          I have been reading comics for over 50 years now. I started with the Dell comics of the '50s (of which the Lone Ranger and Disney titles were my favorites) and have seen many changes in the comic book world over the years and decades.

                          Certain characters have become timeless-The Lone Ranger, the Shadow, Zorro (much older than the '30s, I know), the Green Hornet, Conan, Doc Savage are the best known. Most of these were pulp magazine characters or the subject of movie serials of that time (which I still love). I wonder how many of the younger fans of today realize the glorious heritage of these
                          characters? Good stories, good characters, good art will always sell comics without regard as to when the heroes were created. One of the things I have
                          really enjoyed about the Dynamite Lone Ranger is the respect they show for this great American legend (which Topps did not their series of a decade or so ago). I do hope the same can be said of their handling of Buck Rogers. If Zorro and the Lone Ranger are any indication, the fate of our cultural icons is
                          in capable and respectful hands.

                          I would welcome thoughts by younger readers. The fate of comics and this
                          aspect of popular literature are in your hands.

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                          • #43
                            You bet they are

                            First off a hearty Hiyo to you. As long as the need for escapism is there. Heck who wouldn't want a nice steed these days. the trick is respecting the characters. Dynamite has found a nice balance seeing as the 30's pulp stories could be as lurid as anything these days there isn't much of a leap. But respecting the values of the time period especially the kid friendly cowboy code types I'll hazard that LR is their best and maybe only case that will remain solid because there isn't much grey area with his values to play in. I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for DE to do Red Ryder or anything and the jury is still out for me on Buck I cringe at the thought of a 21 century take on Ardala.

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                            • #44
                              They did the same thing for the Green Hornet.
                              There was an episode called "Beauty comes in Bottles" which was aired Nov, 17 1938during the Time Mike Axford was out of action and replaced by his nephew Timothy Axford. (the original Actor playing Mike had died ) After Mike Axford returned the Episode was re-recorded as "What Price, Glamour?" on Oct, 25 1945

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