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My Review of LR #6 **SPOILERS**

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  • My Review of LR #6 **SPOILERS**

    posted @ Newsarama
    posted @ Lone Ranger Forums
    posted @ ComicBookDB
    posted @ Lone Ranger MySpace Group

    "The mask is my face."

    THE LONE RANGER #6
    writer - Brett Matthews
    art - Sergio Careillo
    color - Dean White
    letters – Simon Bowland
    cover/art direction - John Cassaday


    It's no big secret that I love this series, but I can honestly say this is the best issue yet! This is the issue we've been waiting for! This is exactly what a Lone Ranger comic should be! Non-stop action as the Lone Ranger rescues Tonto and takes on Black Bart one-on-one on top of a moving train. In this issue the Lone Ranger finally finishes the evolution into the character we know. It took a while to get here, but I think it was worth the ride.

    We learn more in this issue about Black Bart. Why he wears his dark glasses, the rough life he's had. After his dialogue with the Ranger, I believe him to have some twisted code of honor. He's still a cold-blooded killer, but with his own perverted personal code, as evidenced by the gift he presents our hero.

    Tonto's character grew a little as well. We still don't know the reasons why he has taken a liking to the Ranger, or anything about his motivation. There is something he sees in the Masked Man that has fostered a sense of loyalty and kinship between them. And now he's re-evaluating what little he believes, shown in his exchange with Bart:

    Bart: "You. I know you're a killer."
    Tonto: "Yes. I used to know it myself."

    The values of the Ranger seem to be rubbing off some onto our Native American friend.

    The Ranger himself has now decided to take on his mission, though he still doesn't fully realize what it is. He states "Nothing's changed. I find the man who had my family and friends killed and I bring him to justice. Or justice to him." But things have changed, and his true mission is much bigger than he can imagine. Tonto sees it, and wants to be a part of it. This origin arc started off dark and gritty, but these last few pages are anything but. The future (of the characters and this title) looks bright and hopeful as the Lone Ranger challenges his friend, "I'll race you to the horizon!"

    Excellent story by Matthews, a very satisfactory conclusion to the opening arc. Cariello's art is fantastic, as it has been through out. White's colors as well. The page of the Lone Ranger and Silver riding to the rescue out of the sun is awe inspiring. I can sum up this issue in two words: SHEER EXCELLENCE!

    Grade: A++
    Last edited by MadMikeyD; 06-10-2007, 04:56 PM.
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  • #2
    YAY

    BTW Spoilers, this text is written in white:

    I like this issue.

    There were a couple of goofy things, for example, I can't really figure out what happened the scene with the train, I mean, I know the jist of what happened but there's a little need of clarification with the transition from one page to the other. Did he derail the entire train? or just the caboose? Also, it looks like bart crashed into a cave? but I can't figure out where the wreckage is. I think Black Bart's death is a little ... "eh." It seems like the writer was attempting an Episode 9 Balance of Terror, but it totally missed the mark on that.

    YAY he saved his sister in law's life

    Those are just minor complaints, I really did like this issue.

    Comment


    • #3
      He derailed the caboose with Bart on it. At least some of the wreckage was surrounding Bart, who it does appear ended up in some type of cave on the side of that mountain. Bart's "death" was left open to interpretation. Personally, I don't think we've seen the last of him. He may be in a wheelchair when we see him again, but I still think we'll see him again sometime in the future.

      I believe Tonto's telegram saved Linda, since Bart was already long gone by the time the Ranger got there. I'd like to know what was in those messages. Whatever was in Bart's, it convinced him not to kill the woman and her son, since he had plenty of time to do it.
      DECODER RING THEATRE
      EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS
      PROJECT SUPERPOWERS DATABASE
      PUBLIC DOMAIN SUPER HEROES

      Comment


      • #4
        Ah, ok so it was JUST the caboose. ok that makes sense.

        ^_^

        TONTO RULEZ!

        Comment


        • #5
          questions

          i too had to look closely at the wreckage surrounding bart at the end. the graphics were hard to figure. that was no cave: that was a hole torn in the wreckage (note twisted steel around the opening). most of it was unclear, tho.
          i don't agree that his death was left open; it wasn't a dead man that sent that telegram to cavendish, it was bart. that much was obvious.

          the telegrams were pretty straightforward too: to bart-I am waiting for you at Bryant's Gap, signed the remaining Ranger. to John-i lured cavendish to bryant's gap. come at once. signed, your new buddy.
          I still don't know why bart was let free after murdering women and babies unless the ranger assumed he was dying (probable). they must have known the engineers, brakemen, etc., would find him, tho. i'm assuming since Bart knows who the Lone Ranger is, we'll be seeing him again in some capacity.
          Cindy

          Originally posted by MadMikeyD
          He derailed the caboose with Bart on it. At least some of the wreckage was surrounding Bart, who it does appear ended up in some type of cave on the side of that mountain. Bart's "death" was left open to interpretation. Personally, I don't think we've seen the last of him. He may be in a wheelchair when we see him again, but I still think we'll see him again sometime in the future.

          I believe Tonto's telegram saved Linda, since Bart was already long gone by the time the Ranger got there. I'd like to know what was in those messages. Whatever was in Bart's, it convinced him not to kill the woman and her son, since he had plenty of time to do it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Cindy’s review of #6. WARNING: SPOILERS!

            It’s hard for me to separate this last issue from the previous 6 (including 0) since to me it constitutes on long story rather than a serial. (If pushed, I’d say my favorite is still issue 3.) I’ve made no secret of the fact that I love this series. I am enjoying seeing the development of the boy that will become the Lone Ranger we all know and love, I think the redesigned Tonto rocks, and I prefer the gritty reality of the first issues to the sanitized violence of the series. However, some impressions.

            I thought it wonderful that Linda Reid survived. When told by another fan that Dan Reid jr. was with the ranger and Tonto most of the time being schooled, taught, trained, etc., my first thought was the sarcastic, "Gosh, that’ll make them effective crime fighters." This eliminates that objection to a large degree. Can’t say I’m impressed with this Dan jr.; at 6-years-old he’s awfully vacuous when compared to the 6-year-old John Reid who was already meditating on matters of life and death with analogies. However, I did like Linda. There was a tenderness to her when she spoke to the young John Reid, and I liked that she recognized him even with the mask by his having Dan’s eyes. It’s only now we realize that she’s a good deal older than him (hard to tell from artwork) but if she’s near Dan’s age, she could be in her early to mid-30’s. I enjoyed the contrast in her affectionately calling him "Boy" to the usage by the other two main characters who use the term almost derisively. Nice little touch.

            I loved the Hi-Yo Silver! scene!! Hope he takes to using the phrase a lot more!

            Great backstory about Bart! His hard life and the sources of his bitterness made him –almost- a sympathetic character. The fight between him and Tonto would have been worth seeing! I doubt Tonto intended to lose for all that later he decided the ranger had to face Bart alone. Looks like he took a pounding even though he must have had 50 pounds on Bart. [shakes head] must have been one heck of a fight! And what a great scene, seeing the Ranger come to the rescue! But Tonto’s motives are only murkier than ever. I guess I could see him attaching himself to the boy a little earlier if only out of a sense of seeing justice done or seeing something in the boy he wanted to preserve (he was willing to die to protect him, after all). But was he willing to die to teach the young man how to learn his own inner moralities? [shakes head in puzzlement] Matthews said he intended Tonto to mentor the Ranger in some ways, but he dove right into the deep end here, didn’t he?

            Great fight between the Ranger and Bart. I liked the Ranger loading that bullet again—the one he made from his badge. The gun is cocked and ready to kill Bart before he changes his mind and realizes he’s not a killer. I believe we’ll see that bullet again some day when he faces Butch Cavendish himself.

            I’m not sure I like that particular origin for the ivory-handled Colts, and really don’t agree that Reid would have accepted them or anything else from that murderer. I definitely question whether he would have let Bart go free after he’d murdered women and babies, although if he thought Bart was mortally wounded (the subsequent telegram proves he was not) he might have left the criminal to die in peace.

            "The mask is my face." [shiver] VERY nice! As was Tonto’s subsequent questioning of his own killer instincts.

            But…HUGE complaint!!! According to the originator of the phrase, Kemo Sabay never meant ‘faithful friend’ but ONLY ‘trusty scout!’ that’s one change that irritates me. [actually annoyed]

            And the adventure continues! Can’t wait for issue 7!!
            CindyR
            Crossposted to EZboard.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by CindyR
              But…HUGE complaint!!! According to the originator of the phrase, Kemo Sabay never meant ‘faithful friend’ but ONLY ‘trusty scout!’ that’s one change that irritates me. [actually annoyed]
              To be fair, the creative team didn't technically change that. Kemosabe has been translated as both. While it's true meaning may be "Trusty Scout," this is not the first time it has been translated as "Faithful Friend." I have a radio interview with Brace Beemer in which he stated it was "Faithful Friend." So while that translation may not be entirely accurate, Matthews and Co. are not the only ones to make the mistake in the history of the character.
              DECODER RING THEATRE
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              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by CindyR
                i too had to look closely at the wreckage surrounding bart at the end. the graphics were hard to figure. that was no cave: that was a hole torn in the wreckage (note twisted steel around the opening). most of it was unclear, tho.
                i don't agree that his death was left open; it wasn't a dead man that sent that telegram to cavendish, it was bart. that much was obvious.
                Bart prepared that telegram to send before he left to meet up with Tonto. He had a fatalistic approach toward his meeting with Tonto and the Ranger.

                the telegrams were pretty straightforward too: to bart-I am waiting for you at Bryant's Gap, signed the remaining Ranger. to John-i lured cavendish to bryant's gap. come at once. signed, your new buddy.
                I still don't know why bart was let free after murdering women and babies unless the ranger assumed he was dying (probable). they must have known the engineers, brakemen, etc., would find him, tho. i'm assuming since Bart knows who the Lone Ranger is, we'll be seeing him again in some capacity.
                Cindy
                Bart is dead, he had a mortal wound, his hand is blown to hell, if he survives then I'll be sorely disappointed in Dynamite.

                Didn't they say in that online interview that this was the conclusion of Black Bart?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Black Bart

                  There isn't any evidence anywhere of a fatalistic "my number is up today because i'm facing these men" attitude in Bart. Not anywhere. he went there prepared to finish what to him was a simple job. he didn't expect to die and he would have NEVER had a reason to believe that "he is coming for you," until the battle was over and he'd lost. Ergo, Bart did not prepare the telegram in advance and is still alive at the conclusion of the story.

                  my only *theory* as to Bart's survival (and non-arrest), is that the Ranger and Tonto saw how badly he was wounded and expected him to die. i can't think of any other reason for sparing him, can you all?
                  [Ellery Queen reading...] Cindy

                  Quote:
                  Bart prepared that telegram to send before he left to meet up with Tonto. He had a fatalistic approach toward his meeting with Tonto and the Ranger.

                  Bart is dead, he had a mortal wound, his hand is blown to hell, if he survives then I'll be sorely disappointed in Dynamite.

                  Didn't they say in that online interview that this was the conclusion of Black Bart?

                  Comment

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