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  • Wild Wild West

    So I was helping my wife bag and board her OLD comics (Donald Duck, Chip&Dale, etc) from her childhood. I stumbled across a Gold Key checklist from I believe 1969 or 1970. In the adventure section was Wild Wild West. Apparently, Gold Key had a comic about the TV series. I loved the show (I saw it in re-runs). It was steampunk before there was steampunk. I was James Bond meets cowboys.

    I wouldn't mind seeing Dynamite try to resurrect that title. They seem to be dipping a bit into steampunk with Legenderry and the upcoming Galactica 1880, so it may be consistent with the direction of getting away from pulp.

  • #2
    I kind of remember this comic and loved the show. And just checked out a little bit of info at

    http://www.comics.org/series/1769/

    They added a comma to the title for some reason. It ran seven issues and had photo covers. Obviously it's one of the many licensed boks they put out and isn't part of the Gold Key rights.

    I find this to be a good site for who published what, how many issues and such.
    Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
    Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
    http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Britt68 View Post
      So I was helping my wife bag and board her OLD comics (Donald Duck, Chip&Dale, etc) from her childhood. I stumbled across a Gold Key checklist from I believe 1969 or 1970. In the adventure section was Wild Wild West. Apparently, Gold Key had a comic about the TV series. I loved the show (I saw it in re-runs). It was steampunk before there was steampunk. I was James Bond meets cowboys.

      I wouldn't mind seeing Dynamite try to resurrect that title. They seem to be dipping a bit into steampunk with Legenderry and the upcoming Galactica 1880, so it may be consistent with the direction of getting away from pulp.
      Well, of course it wasn't steampunk back then, but I think you're correct in identifying TWWW as one of the very first appearances in any media of the kernel of that concept. A Lone Ranger television cartoon from 1966 used the idea as well, possibly influenced by TWWW. But TWWW was probably an attempt to come up with something new to invigorate the Western TV show, which was falling in popularity from its earlier heights in the first couple of years of the 1960s. TWWW saw the chance to cross-breed the genre with the Bond/spy craze of the mid-1960s (The Man From U.N.C.L.E. had aired on TV the season before) and took it, throwing in some SF elements like the Bond/spy genre, only referencing them from the POV of the very popular (at the time) film adaptations of Jules Verne and H.G. Wells, which was first kicked off by Disney's 20,000 LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA in 1954, and imitated by many other studios with films right up to the time TWWW first aired.

      DE could certainly do a TWWW comic and make it even more "steampunky". Perhaps even at some point do a crossover with the Lone Ranger.

      Excellent suggestion, Britt! (How lucky you are, to have a spouse who also reads and collects comics.)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by pulphero View Post
        Excellent suggestion, Britt! (How lucky you are, to have a spouse who also reads and collects comics.)
        Thanks. I appreciate the compliment. I just would like Dynamite to pick up some titles I like.

        I am very lucky to have the spouse I have. Our local comic book store always jokes that we have the best holds: pulp (me), super hero (oldest daughter), manifest destiny/fables (my wife), Peanuts/Strawberry Shortcake (youngest).

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        • #5
          Britt, if only families like yours were more common. It would give me hope for comics (and reading in general) heading into the future. I don't mean to be depressing, but looking at statistics about readers today just makes the future seem bleak. People like you are the only hope to counteract that, there just don't seem to be enough.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by pulphero View Post
            Britt, if only families like yours were more common. It would give me hope for comics (and reading in general) heading into the future. I don't mean to be depressing, but looking at statistics about readers today just makes the future seem bleak. People like you are the only hope to counteract that, there just don't seem to be enough.
            Everyone in my family are big readers. My wife used to work at borders where we got a huge employee discount, but I think every penny she made went back in books. I am worried about reading in general. You should check out a kids book called "it's just a book" for a humorous take on the situation.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Britt68 View Post
              Everyone in my family are big readers. My wife used to work at borders where we got a huge employee discount, but I think every penny she made went back in books. I am worried about reading in general. You should check out a kids book called "it's just a book" for a humorous take on the situation.
              I don't want to sound like the harbinger of doom, but I'm not sure I could find the humorous aspect of the situation, which appears dire indeed to me.
              Here are the type of statistics that keep me from sleeping peacefully:
              • Reading frequency declines after the age of eight.
              • 66% of eighth grade students do not read at a proficient level.
              • 25% of people over age 16 have not read a book in the last year.
              • 33% of high school graduates never read another book for the rest of their lives.
              • 42% of college graduates never read another book after college.
              • 57% of new books are not read to completion.
              • 70% of U.S. adults have not been in a bookstore in the last five years.
              • 80% of U.S. families have not bought or read a book in the last year.
              • 46% of adults score in the two lowest levels of literacy.
              • 71% of prison inmates score in the two lowest levels of literacy.
              • 61% of adults in the two lowest levels of literacy live in poverty.

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