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  • #91
    Well. See there, she doesn't particularly look to be 15 in the above image, does she? Apparently the youthful look is just part of the costume designer's cartooning style, and not indicative of anything.

    I haven't really followed Batgirl since her New 52 rebooting; the only thing I really know is that the book started off with relatively decent sales (more or less to be expected by her association with the Bat-family of titles), but apparently has slipped quite a bit in the last 2 and a half years. After reading that litany of abuse and grimness heaped upon the character, this seems like a breath of fresh air and the right way to go. Perhaps I'll even give it a read when it comes out, although as stated before, I'm clearly not part of this new direction's intended demographic. Nevertheless, I applaud the attempt.

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    • #92
      They talk about her going back tp grad school which would put her at least in her mid to late 20's. To me, even in the second pic, she still looks a little to young. But as you say that may just be artistic style.

      I do like alot of things about the new costume. The Belt, Gloves and Cape look good and make sense. I'm not a fan of the Leather over spandex but I can see the point. The cowl doesn't look to be attached to anything which makes if to easy to be knocked off kilter or off. And I just plain hate the boots.
      Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
      Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
      http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

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      • #93
        I think it will be good. Gail basically explained that she left the book due to creative differences with the editor--then after she left, the editor left... and now the new editor sounds like someone she'd have worked better with... and Gail is also very happy that the new editorial direction is going to be less grim/dark, and she thinks the new creative team is going to be good.

        Which does sound to me like the grim/dark stuff (which has kept me from getting as much into the book as I'd like--I generally really love her work, and I got more into her Movement series) was foisted on her by the editor (big shock there, DC).

        I think I will be picking this up. Park of what I ... despise (I shan't quibble here) about the New 52 has been the relentless grim/dark thing.

        On another note, there's a Green Lantern New Gods event making Highfather and the New Gods of New Genesis as basically the villains. So now we have the Amazons, the Guardians, and the New Genesis good guys as evil in the new DCU. I'll enjoy the few bright spots (like Batgirl here) as I can, but this awful dystopia can't end soon enough for me.

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        • #94
          Posted on Facebook:

          From the "annoyed comics fan" category: http://www.nerdist.com/2014/07/exclu...event-godhead/ Great. So now, after the Amazons and the original Guardians, the New Gods of New Genesis (you know, the good guys who fight Darkseid of Apokolips) are bad guys too? Yuck. I cannot WAIT for this dystopic universe to be rebooted.

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          • #95
            Originally posted by ChastMastr View Post
            Posted on Facebook:

            From the "annoyed comics fan" category: http://www.nerdist.com/2014/07/exclu...event-godhead/ Great. So now, after the Amazons and the original Guardians, the New Gods of New Genesis (you know, the good guys who fight Darkseid of Apokolips) are bad guys too? Yuck. I cannot WAIT for this dystopic universe to be rebooted.
            After reading the description, I'm not entirely convinced that the gods of New Genesis are the real bad guys here. I don't know what's been going on with the Green Lantern titles these days, but stealing cosmic secrets from the Source doesn't seem like something that's particularly defensible as the prerogative of "the good guys". Then there's been the revelation that use of the energy powering the rings is actually hastening the entropic failure of the universe itself. Not having read any GL stories beyond "The End", I can only say that looking from the outside, the GLC doesn't seem like they're doing much of a job of protecting the universe; the various internecine wars between the different Corps of the emotional spectrum seem like a greater danger to the universe than any external threats. Maybe it's about time someone stepped in and put a stop to all this nonsense, and maybe Highfather just elected himself. Possibly Highfather is even getting his marching orders from that mystic hand of fire etching out letters on a blank stone wall, like a teacher on a blackboard. Of course, that begs the question of where were the New Gods when the Guardians were running ragged over the universe, but maybe they just become a little territorial when dealing with someone violating the Source.
            Not that I particularly think that DC is going to be characterizing the GLC as the bad guys in this event, but I don't have much regard for them as heroes these days. I didn't read the New 52 Wonder Woman (far too grim for my tastes) so I don't know what role the rebooted Kirby creations were cast in there, either.
            Last edited by pulphero; 07-14-2014, 05:57 AM.

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            • #96
              i really miss the old continuity. after Forever Evil i cut a bunch of books off my reading list. i'm really sad about All Star Western ending. really loved that book. guess it couldn't survive on its own after Hex made his way out of Gotham.

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              • #97
                Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                Not that I particularly think that DC is going to be characterizing the GLC as the bad guys in this event, but I don't have much regard for them as heroes these days. I didn't read the New 52 Wonder Woman (far too grim for my tastes) so I don't know what role the rebooted Kirby creations were cast in there, either.
                Ditto on both counts re the Lanterns and the New 52 WW. I've seen glimpses and excerpts, and New Genesis seems to be kind of... ah... militaristic. They have some good moments, too, but... well, here you go. I mean, maybe some of it is indeed a test of Orion, but ... since Orion seems to accept this as normal, it kind of makes me think.
                Last edited by ChastMastr; 07-15-2014, 12:52 AM.

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                • #98
                  So New Genisis has done a 180 from it's original concept of a 'cosmic hippie' thing. Just another reason not to follow DC. I don't mind change, but if it's just for the sake of change?
                  Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
                  Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
                  http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

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                  • #99
                    Originally posted by Ghornet2 View Post
                    So New Genisis has done a 180 from it's original concept of a 'cosmic hippie' thing. Just another reason not to follow DC. I don't mind change, but if it's just for the sake of change?
                    Well, you could arguably call Kirby's original Forever People a cosmic hippie thing. Seems to me that New Gods and Mister Miracle were more like a 'life during wartime' thing. Although Izaya personally rejected the way of war to embrace the way of peace for himself, when The Pact was broken he knew he couldn't remain neutral while the forces of tyranny threated, so he wasn't above using Orion as his own personal war god. In fact, the Source told him to do it. "ORION TO APOKOLIPS -- THEN TO EARTH -- THEN TO WAR", thus writ the flaming finger of fate. A similar situation may well apply to this "Godhead" storyline.

                    The big question in my mind is what gives the GLC the right to steal the Source's cosmic secrets? The gods of New Genesis haven't traditionally been portrayed as vengeful, but then they've not really needed to be in their dealings with humanity - in Kirby's own comics they were fighting a defensive war. I can't see the essential difference between the GLC stealing the cosmic secrets of the Source, and Krona seeking forbidden knowledge of the Moment of Creation. You'd think the GLC would know their own history better.

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                    • Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                      You'd think the GLC would know their own history better.

                      Or that DC would. But I am getting snarky, so I shall stop.

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                      • What do you guys think about The Multiversity? Some of the stories sound really interesting, but some don't. The ones I'm looking forward to are the pulp Doc Fate one, the Charlton heroes one (I like the Question) and the Shazam one.
                        I'm most excited about the pulp one. It's got zombie paratroopers!

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                        • I know I will love it... but I also wish there was more hope it wouldn't reference the New 52. Or at least refer to the pre-Flashpoint DCU as going on somewhere in the multiverse. The most recent info has actually disheartened me regarding all that.

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                          • I have high hopes for Multiversity. The Flash is Grant Morrison's favorite comic book of all time, so anything to do with parallel universes is right in his wheelhouse. That little 2-issue Final Crisis miniseries, Superman Beyond 3-D, was one of the best things he ever wrote, even though it's atypical for him in length (he usually works long-form). Ironically, he only ever wrote one 9-issue run on The Flash. I don't even remember it being that good (1997-98), but perhaps I should go back and take another look at it. He took over in the wake of Mark Waid's LONG (and superb) run on The Flash, and I was pretty sad about Waid leaving the title after all that time.
                            Last edited by pulphero; 07-31-2014, 12:08 AM.

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                            • Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                              Ironically, he only ever wrote one 9-issue run on The Flash. I don't even remember it being that good (1997-98), but perhaps I should go back and take another look at it.
                              I'm tempted to say... well...

                              Virtually everything I have read by Morrison, I have loved.

                              Virtually everything I have read by Mark Millar, I have loathed.

                              The two exceptions to the Morrison stuff that I found less thrilling were his run on Flash and Aztek.

                              Both of which he wrote with Mark Millar... (light bulb goes on)

                              Another person's review of that run is here: http://www.comicsbulletin.com/column...millars-flash/

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                              • Originally posted by ChastMastr View Post
                                Virtually everything I have read by Mark Millar, I have loathed.
                                Try Superman Adventures. He's capable of doing the job.

                                It's just that he's tapped into the same ethos as Warren Ellis did with Stormwatch and The Authority. Those books fairly revolutionized the concept of superteams for the new millenium. Which is to say, hard, cold, and take no prisoners. These guys play hardball. If you've seen the Justice League animated series where they did the alternate universe episode with the Justice Lords, that's a cleaned-up version of where these guys are aimed. With Millar he went down the same path (after following Ellis' run on The Authority) doing versions of established superhero characters using that same type of thinking -- the Elseworlds Superman: Red Son, then The Ultimates for Marvel. Then on to Wanted, Kick Ass, Nemesis, Superior, Supercrooks, and the rest of Millarworld.

                                Of course it's all following in the footsteps of Alan Moore's Watchmen, but there we sort of got to see things from the POV of after-the-fact, whereas when Ellis and Millar do their superthang, it's as-it's-happening (and something Moore never dealt with -- these people ALL have "Threat Level Alpha" superpowers). This sort of real-world politics intruding upon the "superhero fantasy universe" isn't for everyone. It's sturm-und-drang and ultimate power fantasies for the teen and twenty-something backbone superhero universe reader of today. Sure, it's a bit of a mercenary way to insure that you continue to have a working career in the industy, but these guys have obviously tapped into the current zeitgeist.

                                I don't take it too seriously, but I do think there's room for at least one or two superteam books like that at any given time, if done well. As long as it doesn't infect the entire genre with the hyperviolence. The book filling that slot for me right now is Jonathan Hickman's New Avengers (which is just a better-selling title for a book than "The Illuminati", just like Justice League Dark is a better-selling title than "The Vertigo Squad"). In these books, everything's right off the scale in terms of the stakes. For example, in the current issue of New Avengers, Prince Namor destroys the Earth. Not the Marvel 616-Universe Earth, of course, but still -- pretty drastic stuff. Mind you, this IS the Marvel 616-Universe Prince Namor, destroying another universe's Earth, after the Illuminati finish killing that earth's version of the JLA or the Squadron Supreme (who weren't even evil, or anything like that). It's all part of a series of 'Incursion Events' that only the Illuminati (Reed Richards, Tony Stark, Hank McCoy, T'Challa, Black Bolt, Dr. Strange, and Namor, along with the recently-recruited Bruce Banner) are aware of. They've learned how to predict the next upcoming Incursion, and have created a cluster of strategically-placed antimatter hyperbombs powerful enough to destroy a planet (after Dr. Strange mindwiped Captain America to prevent him from stopping them). If the Incursion isn't stopped, two parallel earths will attempt to occupy the same vibrational plane, resulting in both earths being destroyed, which then touches off a ripple effect, destroying both universes in their entirety. When it comes right down to it, all of the Illuminati look at each other, and none of them can push the button -- except Namor. This is the guy who unleashed a tsunami on New York City in 1939, and once summoned Giganto, The Whale-Thing That Walks, from the watery depths to attack the human race, so it's not inconsistent characterization. Regardless, this particular subgenre or outgrowth of the superhero genre presents interesting ethical dilemmas that can't usually be explored in typical superhero universe comics. The various members of the Illuminati all wrestle their own personal demons on the crux of decision. As the smartest guys in the room (this particular room being the 616 universe) the responsibility hangs on their heads. Do they have the right to preserve their own personal code of ethics in the face of the consequences -- i.e., if they fail to take any action at all, and merely resign themselves to their fate rather than cross those moral boundary lines, they will be implicitly culpable for the deaths of trillions upon trillions of sentient beings in two universes.

                                An interesting exploration of the whole "with great power comes great responsibility" trope taken to the ultimate extreme, but extremes are what this particular subgenre is all about. When it explores those meaty real-world moral quandaries, it's at its best. At it's worst it's just an excuse for over-the-top hyperviolence for its own sake, or dispensing with the usual moral imperatives of white hats vs. black hats to embrace a gray world where the only thing that really matters is which side can deliver the most brutal ass-whuppin' (all delivered with panache and in cinematic widescreen style, of course). Blame 1990s Image Comics for that.

                                I have to admit, though... making a Superman movie, like Man of Steel, in which these sort of heavy moral issues intrude on the usual Superman ideology of boundless hope and idealism does undermine the entire Superman myth, so these stories should probably never be told, because it destroys the character.
                                Last edited by pulphero; 08-01-2014, 04:21 AM.

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