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New Black Hood Coming from Dark Cirlcle / Archie in February 2015

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  • New Black Hood Coming from Dark Cirlcle / Archie in February 2015

    There was an article from CBR on February's Black Hood that showed some of the variant covers planned:

    Click image for larger version

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    by Francesco Francavilla

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    by Howard Chaykin

    http://www.comicbookresources.com/?p...ticle&id=57215

    This could be a nice dark & gritty title . . . only time will tell.

  • #2
    Seems a little too much like Swierczynski's own X from Dark Horse to me (Dark Horse, Dark Circle... hmm).

    This is the title (of the three announced) that I'm least looking forward to. I pretty much know what to expect with the continuation of The Fox under the previous creative team of Haspiel and Waid, but The Shield is more of a complete reboot, so I have no idea where they'll be going with it.

    Speaking of The Fox, since it would seem to be a direct continuation of Haspiel and Waid's previous miniseries, which was set in the same universe as New Crusaders, I wonder if Black Hood and The Shield are part of the same universe as well. I thought New Crusaders was pretty well written, and a good revamp of the old team, although it probably would have had more acceptance in the marketplace if it had employed a more realistic/contemporary art style.
    Last edited by pulphero; 11-21-2014, 01:18 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by pulphero View Post
      Seems a little too much like Swierczynski's own X from Dark Horse to me (Dark Horse, Dark Circle... hmm).

      This is the title (of the three announced) that I'm least looking forward to. I pretty much know what to expect with the continuation of The Fox under the previous creative team of Haspiel and Waid, but The Shield is more of a complete reboot, so I have no idea where they'll be going with it.

      Speaking of The Fox, since it would seem to be a direct continuation of Haspiel and Waid's previous miniseries, which was set in the same universe as New Crusaders, I wonder if Black Hood and The Shield are part of the same universe as well. I thought New Crusaders was pretty well written, and a good revamp of the old team, although it probably would have had more acceptance in the marketplace if it had employed a more realistic/contemporary art style.
      I agree on many points. I liked the New Crusaders as it maintained the continuity of the MLJ/Archie Adventure comics of the 1980s. The 1980s Shield stories made me a fan of the Crusaders characters (I first discovered these characters then). I also agree that they should have started out with the Shield as the first series on the Dark Circle universe. The Black Hood sounds good but many comic fans have seen this type of character before (like Dark Horse's X series) and will pass by this title. The premise of the Shield sounds like they are going to show a connection with the original Shield and this variation will be female and still be a government agent dedicated to protecting the country. What makes it interesting is that there will be plot elements that make the Shield question protecting the government that may be corrupt or engaged in activities that might not be the country she wants to protect. It does sound like they will all be in the same universe but less relying upon that continuity. I liked Waid/Haspiel's Fox and am looking forward to more. Hopefully these will be successful and the New Crusaders will return as well.

      My favorite of the crusaders has been the Shield--America's first patriotic hero. I felt that DC went away from the concept of G-man extraordinaire to making the Shield a super-solider clone of Captain America. To me, the Shield is best portrayed as the spy-smashing government agent.

      My only regret with the New Crusaders is that the Jaguar was gender-switched. I like the new Jaguar but the male wild hero icon (Wolverine, Hulk, Timber Wolf, etc.) would sell better in a solo title. Maybe since the new Jaguar gets her powers from different magical objects that another male successor to the Jaguar legend would be considered down the line? I do like that the character is of Hispanic ethnic group (one good thing DC did with the character twice) as it plays up the Aztec/Mayan/Inca origins of the Jaguar belt.

      I like that the Web is one that finds connections--just wish they would play up the internet angle. Perhaps future stories, if we ever get them, would have the Web be the Archie Adventure Universe's version of the Oracle (from DCU).

      Steel Sterling was great before in the 1980s (explanation of staying young over the decades and stories of him being a community hero--Young Steelers mentor). With his son, you have potential stories of trying to live up to a legend in today's world. Steel Sterling was one of comicdom's first celebrity heroes as his identity was publicly known. The original Steel Sterling turned a formal criminal into a hero (Inferno--this would be a great comic hero in the way that other heroes and public would question his commitment to justice).

      The new Comet is great (iconic flying energy blasting hero). I would, however, return the color scheme of his costume back to his predecessor's primary red/blue colors. The potential plot idea that his father was a former criminal gives the Comet a great story arc.

      The Fly-Girl is the character with the most potential. Archie is unable to use the Fly, so they use Fly-Girl. The Fly is a combination of Captain Marvel and Spiderman (some rumored evidence that the Silver Spider proposed by Simon & Kirby to Stan Lee lead to the creation of Spiderman). This current version plays down the mystic dimension powers of the character but still can be that normal person with normal problems turning into the super hero.

      With the New Crusaders, I do like the using the Shield as the team's mentor. I just wish that it would been revealed that Joe Higgins was using grey hair coloring to better reflect his age as his powers and time in suspension state was preventing him from aging.

      As you can tell, I liked the Crusaders and am glad that Archie is now in control of their characters again creatively. Archie as a publisher is trying anything to get a sale--marrying Archie, Archie Zombie comic, Archie/Predator series, Sabrina witchcraft comic, Megaman, and the Sonic comics. I love their let's try anything approach in this market. I am planning on picking up all three of these Dark Circle titles for at least the first arcs to give these titles a chance of success.

      I do not know how to propose a concept to a comic company other than these type of postings. I would create a new version of Captain Flag to make him or her more of a counterpoint to the government agent Shield by making the new Captain Flag more of a Ayn Rand character (exposing more Libertarian views of less government--kind of having Green Lantern/Green Arrow-like conflicts in the stories).

      At least I still have my dreams...

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      • #4
        My idea for Steel Sterling would have been for him to be the original guy (with essentially the same power level as Marvel's Luke Cage), but treat him as a celebrity superhero. He has a public identity, skyscraper HQ, owns all sorts of different companies (a line of gymnasiums, health food franchise, detective agency franchise), has a line of motivational/self-help books/videos, spends a lot of time using his public image to associate with charities and other philanthropic causes. He's had movies, cartoons, comic books, and toys all based on him, using the licensing fees to finance other worthy projects. He's wealthy, but uses his wealth as a power base to try to effect positive social change. A lot like Doc Savage or Superman, but not a genius or high-tech guy, just a guy who's ageless and invulnerable, and really strong, and has a really strong belief in the power of positive thinking and helping people to help themselves. There would probably be an opportunity to create a varied supporting cast of people who work for him.

        I like the idea of the Web as a sort of like the version of the Question seen in the DC animated series. He investigates all the hidden connections and conspiracies, uncovers the dirty laundry, using a combination of detective skills and finding information using the internet. It would be a lot like "Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon" in that you can make these associational connections between things that might seem unconnected at first, it's just a matter of following the right threads... everything is ultimately connected in some way, in a "Web" of information.

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        • #5
          I like that idea for the Web (a combination of the Oracle and the Question)--cool!

          Among Archie's superhero stable, there are many that would fit well in today's comic book marketplace.

          THE HANGMAN--What a great name for a super-vigilante! As established from the 1980s Mighty Crusaders and shown in the New Crusaders, The Hangman was comicdom's first hero to have been related to another hero (the Comet--brother). The Comet was the first to die in comics (later shown to get better--I know, such a rare thing these days) inspiring the Hangman to fill the void. In the 1980s, the Hangman's son took over the role of his father (he is currently serving time in jail for crossing the line and killing criminals). DC comics made the character a sort of supernatural hero (I liked the Batman variation). MY PROPOSAL: Besides minor costume coloring change from green/blue to grey/black and maybe eliminating the cape, I would propose a switch to the traditional serial killer plot (you know, on tv cop shows when an imprisoned serial killer is somehow killing people on the outside of prison which is later revealed that a rabid fan is copying the M.O. of the original serial killer). Someone pretending to be the Hangman is stalking/taking down the underworld (maybe the mob family led by Death Monger)piece by piece leaving behind a card with a hangman's gallows plus part of a figure (like the hangman game of vocabulary). The cops are confused as the original Hangman is in prison and any living relatives of the Hangman have alibis. The mob is running scared as each card left behind of this new Hangman is completing the hanged man figure.

          MR. JUSTICE--Another great name for a hero! In Archie's continuity, Mr. Justice has powerful Spectre-like powers. I find these powers too powerful to believe. Currently, shown to be stuck in limbo according to New Crusaders. MY PROPOSAL: Mr. Justice's release from this magical limbo reduces his powers far away from the Spectre-level abilities. Now, Mr. Justice is as strong as five adult men and magic fire energy blasts that can only effect those with supernatural powers. When in ghost mode, Mr. Justice can fly, but is invisible and intangible, and can possess normal humans. He can summon the dead and communicate with them. He is drawn to the supernatural evil due to the prophesy visions that create nightmares for him. In his mortal mode, despite his strength and mystic energy blasts, he is vulnerable to physical harm. He can also cast illusions to confuse or inspire fear in his enemies. Because he originally a loyal knight of ancient England, he feels or is impelled to stay defending the innocent of England. During daylight hours, he must reside in the mind of an innocent to recharge his powers (in the Blue Ribbon Comics issue from the 1980s, he appeared to go inside the body of a girl of a police detective, perhaps this girl is a distant relative of Mr. Justice himself and is limited to only descendants for refuge).

          DARKLING--a great character from the 1980s, a Chinese heroine who has a cloak of mystic transportation and some medium-like psychic powers. Currently, in a coma-like state after conflict with the Brain Emperor according to New Crusaders. MY PROPOSAL: Wake her up. Maybe revise her costume to be more of a Mortal Combat costume?

          DR. MALCOLM REEVES--In the 1980s, he was a supporting character and member of the team (Archie's first African American hero)--killed in action at end of Mighty Crusaders. In New Crusaders, it is implied that he is an uncle of the current Comet and brother of the criminal that helped the New Crusaders in the prison riot story. MY PROPOSAL: Many clones of the good doctor surface working in a government science development project (similar to Cadmus Project and that island that the Doom Patrol was HQ on)--potential stories of wild science.

          BLACKJACK--Nice original costume and hero of Las Vegas. Stories of gambling and luck as potential themes.

          INFERNO--the original reformed super-criminal who tries to do the right thing despite the public fearing him. I did like the visuals of DC's version of Inferno--he looked bad%$# and dangerous.

          Comment


          • #6
            http://www.bleedingcool.com/2014/11/...igo-territory/

            Umm... I think I'm going to opt out of reading BLACK HOOD, after reading the above. Not really what I'm looking for in an Archie superhero line.

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            • #7
              Dark Circle is putting out a FCBD book that looks to be an intro to thee universe and characters. I figure to pick it up for a look, but it does sounds like Black Hood will be a pass for me as well.
              Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
              Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
              http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

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              • #8
                Unfortunately, sounds like I may be saving my money by not buying these . . .

                Comment


                • #9
                  (referring to the Dark Circle Comics version of THE BLACK HOOD: )
                  Our hero is a drug addict hopped on pills and someone gets shotgun to the face in the first issue. So, no, these are not your Grandfather’s Red Circle Comics.

                  Other titles will see The Fox go to a new dangerous mania and The Shield is expected to appeal to a Tumblr audience.
                  I have no gripe against the Marvel MAX/Vertigo R-rated characters in principle... I've read (and enjoyed) several of them - but it's been done (and, I'd hazard a guess, probably better). And those comics were from companies that published dozens of mainstream superhero titles every single month, so for them, it represented relatively unexplored territory.

                  So... I was not particularly impressed when I heard the creative team on BLACK HOOD, (not a fan of either of those creators' work), but resolved to give it a chance for the first issue, at least. But after reading the above, I think I can save my money. I'll still pick up the FCBD freebie. To me, The Black Hood is, at heart, a cop. He should retain a policeman's attitudes, sensibilities, methodologies, and outlook... not become "Punisher MAX lite".

                  I LOVED The New Crusaders and The Fox in their miniseries from the last couple of years. The artwork in those titles was somewhat in the vein of the DC Animated Universe, which I was fine with, but I could see as a bit of a stumbling block to a wider audience acceptance... Still scratching my head over how that same FOX (a fun book similar to Marvel's recent SHE-HULK or FF series in tone) that I read by Dean Haspiel and Mark Waid is going to "go to a dangerous new mania" (with the same creative team)... and "The Shield is expected to appeal to a Tumblr audience"...???? What does that even MEAN? I know what Tumblr is, but how is a comic book character like Tumblr? What, are we talking Dark Circle's answer to DC's new BATGIRL revamp? (I sure hope not; the new BATGIRL seems hopelessly forced and unnatural in trying to be "now").

                  What I'd have liked to see from Archie Comics is a superhero line with mainstream contemporary-style artwork, TEEN+ rated (MPAA PG). The fact that they're aiming for 180 degrees away from the previous Red Circle revamp indicates to me that they just perceive too much market resistance from the entrenched DC and Marvel superhero readers. I can't help but think that Archie Comics taking their "Dark Circle" superhero revamp straight into the hard R-rated "Vertigo/MAX" arena smacks of a desperate cry for attention from (I hate to say it) a dying company. As the last of the remaining comic book companies besides DC and Marvel that began publishing in the Golden Age, Archie Comics remained relentlessly conservative in their approach up until less than a decade ago. In the time since, many of their long-running characters have seen their titles cancelled, leading to such experimentation as Archie comics guest-starring President Obama and Sarah Palin, KISS, and the cast of TV's GLEE; the introduction of the first gay character to have his own ongoing series (Kevin Keller)... and the first gay marriage in comics; variations in the standard Archie approach (Life With Archie/"The Married Life", Afterlife With Archie, Chilling Tales of Sabrina), branching out into different formats (graphic novels, magazine format, 1000 Page mega-digests, digital). So maybe the Vertigo/MAX "Mature Readers Only" approach was only a matter of time.
                  Last edited by pulphero; 12-14-2014, 03:22 AM.

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                  • #10
                    I plan on giving these titles at least a first arc look. As stated in previous posts, I became a Mighty Crusaders fan since the 1980s Archie Adventure Comics line (particularly the spy smasher g-man the Shield). Not sure if the MAX imprint treatment is necessary but as Pulp Hero said Archie/Dark Circle is desperate to make some splash in today's comic book market. Unless you are DC or Marvel, superhero comics from other publishers rarely sell well. DE has got a niche audience in its Pulp Line. Dark Horse is attempting a violent Dark Sky Project (Black Hood sounds a lot like Dark Horse's X), but I understand Dark Horse does better with non superheroes/horror characters like Conan/Buffy/Hellboy. Non-superhero titles seem to be supported by local comic-book shops--Image Comics' Walking Dead/Manifest Destiny, DE's Vampirella/Red Sonja/John Carter/Chaos, etc.. Perhaps this edge approach will help Archie sell their superheroes? It seems to be getting notice and sales with its Afterlife of Archie and Sabrina titles going full horror approach.

                    More interested in the Fox and the Shield than Black Hood, but I am planning on giving each a chance. Free Comic Book Day edition is a good step for Archie publications. I wish they did a FCBD edition for New Crusaders than a two-page ad in a FCBD Megaman/Sonic flip book, missed opportunity. As for Archie, Mega Man and Sonic comics are quite good artistically.
                    Last edited by Blinky McQuade; 12-14-2014, 11:38 AM.

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                    • #11
                      I don't know that I'd characterize Dark Horse's Project Black Sky titles as "violent"... at least, no more so than other current mainstream superhero comics I've read. Certainly no where near the "Mature Readers" level of Vertigo or Marvel MAX (but it does make the choice of "Dark Circle Comics" as an imprint name for Archie's new line somewhat clearer). Of course, I say that as someone who read only 4 or 5 issues out of the entire run of Swierzcynski's X for Dark Horse, so I may have missed some of the darker, more violent episodes... but I'm certainly not seeing anything out of the PG/TEEN+ range in the other Project Black Sky titles.

                      I've been a fan of the Archie superheroes even longer, since the Silver Age incarnations, "High Camp" and all. I did skip DC's last reworking of those characters, after sampling some of the early ones, but had liked the Impact Comics version DC had done before in the 1990s. Not being a fan of Swierzcynski's X for Dark Horse, I was shaky about his Black Hood to begin with, so all I really needed to hear was "drug addict hero" and "shotgun to the face". Those may turn out to be exaggerations... maybe BH isn't an addict by his own choice, but was subjected to some sort of experimental drug, and maybe he's not the one pulling the trigger on that "shotgun to the face" (he may even be on the receiving end of that blast, which would explain the hood). But to be honest (and from what I already know of the creators' work) the prospects look pretty bleak to me for BLACK HOOD. I haven't quite written off FOX or SHIELD yet, and will probably give them an arc, maybe more, since those descriptions above are pretty vague, to say the least. THE FOX is the most puzzling, having already seen and enjoyed the creative team's work on the prior miniseries. While I'd truly love to see an Archie superhero line as a viable publishing commodity, I'm not going to send the wrong message by financially supporting a direction for the characters which I consider to be a bad decision in creative terms.
                      Last edited by pulphero; 12-14-2014, 01:58 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                        I don't know that I'd characterize Dark Horse's Project Black Sky titles as "violent"... at least, no more so than other current mainstream superhero comics I've read. Certainly no where near the "Mature Readers" level of Vertigo or Marvel MAX (but it does make the choice of "Dark Circle Comics" as an imprint name for Archie's new line somewhat clearer). Of course, I say that as someone who read only 4 or 5 issues out of the entire run of Swierzcynski's X for Dark Horse, so I may have missed some of the darker, more violent episodes... but I'm certainly not seeing anything out of the PG/TEEN+ range in the other Project Black Sky titles.

                        I've been a fan of the Archie superheroes even longer, since the Silver Age incarnations, "High Camp" and all. I did skip DC's last reworking of those characters, after sampling some of the early ones, but had liked the Impact Comics version DC had done before in the 1990s. Not being a fan of Swierzcynski's X for Dark Horse, I was shaky about his Black Hood to begin with, so all I really needed to hear was "drug addict hero" and "shotgun to the face". Those may turn out to be exaggerations... maybe BH isn't an addict by his own choice, but was subjected to some sort of experimental drug, and maybe he's not the one pulling the trigger on that "shotgun to the face" (he may even be on the receiving end of that blast, which would explain the hood). But to be honest (and from what I already know of the creators' work) the prospects look pretty bleak to me for BLACK HOOD. I haven't quite written off FOX or SHIELD yet, and will probably give them an arc, maybe more, since those descriptions above are pretty vague, to say the least. THE FOX is the most puzzling, having already seen and enjoyed the creative team's work on the prior miniseries. While I'd truly love to see an Archie superhero line as a viable publishing commodity, I'm not going to send the wrong message by financially supporting a direction for the characters which I consider to be a bad decision in creative terms.
                        According to Comic Resources, "NYCC: Sweierczynski Puts on Dark Circle's Black Hood" (Oct. 13), the character was a good Philadelphia cop from a good family that needs to hide his disfigured face (from shotgun blast) with a hood to "hide the monster he thinks he has become" (can't smile anymore and now has a speech impediment). It will be real villains not spandex types trying to shrink the city council with a ray (paraphrased quote). Greg Hettinger will be realistic, in a city of crime , and the villains will be more like those from THE WIRE not the outlandish villains from ARROW or GOTHAM. It will be more in lines with the violence from his run on Punisher MAX. A speech therapist Jesse Dupree and his former partner Devon Allen who try to prevent Greg from "circling the drain". It is the same cop who wears a mask outside the law with a more gritty crime fiction twist. The painkiller drugs are what he is hooked on. Another tag line in an advertisement for the first issues says "What does a man do when he can no longer face the world, yet wants to do good?--He puts on a Hood." Perhaps the summary/commentary comparing the title to MAX and Vertigo is not whole in accuracy. Perhaps it is just a gritty crime comic story that we have seen in some Daredevil, Judge Dredd, Batman, and Punisher stories? The first five issues is the origin arc. I still plan on giving this a chance. The economy that effects me will ultimately determine which comics I will support in the long term.

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                        • #13
                          I personally felt Archie could put out a more conservative variation of these characters with out the extreme story angles. I always thought the Black Hood, for example from the stable of Archie's super heroes, could be like the crime stories I read from the Haney/Aparo The Brave and the Bold run in the 1970s. Batman did not just team up with a guest star, he recruited guest stars in his war on crime. The Teen Titans were used by Batman to break up a chop shop ring. The Atom was used in stopping a gold shipment theft. The Metal Men brought in to stop terrorists in a sky-scrapper. ETC. If Archie wanted a conservative super hero range, I would make them like the 1970s DC and Marvel that told great stories under the Comics Code Authority. However, as we deal with the reality of the comic book industry marketplace, Archie may indeed be "desperate" for its survival. Or maybe they feel that they NEED to make a splash in today's market as opposed to a more conservative effort.

                          What is wrong with a comic marketed to "all-ages"? One of the best comics I ever bought as an adult was Batman Adventures based on the cartoon Batman: the Animated Series. The stories were serious and for all-ages not kids. Archie could have put out this type of Mighty Crusaders comic and maintained its wholesome reputation that it had been known for (of course if one read the original Hangman stories from the MLJ golden age era, one knows that this current take on the Black Hood is not that much of a stretch). There are sites like comicbookplus.com that give free access to golden age comics (including MLJ, Quality, Fawcett, etc.--except National or Timely).
                          Last edited by Blinky McQuade; 12-14-2014, 06:24 PM.

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                          • #14
                            I'm going to give this a try. The Black Hood is one of the few characters who appeared in both the Pulps and Golden Age Comics.

                            This takes looks to be a pretty grim and gritty version of him, but I'm willing to give it a shot.

                            Archie has been doing some pretty fine offbeat material lately with Afterlife With Archie and Sabrina.

                            These characters have been relaunched/revamped before and didn't last very long. The last time at DC was atrocious. I'm hoping Archie has better luck in-house.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Blinky McQuade View Post
                              I personally felt Archie could put out a more conservative variation of these characters with out the extreme story angles. I always thought the Black Hood, for example from the stable of Archie's super heroes, could be like the crime stories I read from the Haney/Aparo The Brave and the Bold run in the 1970s. Batman did not just team up with a guest star, he recruited guest stars in his war on crime. The Teen Titans were used by Batman to break up a chop shop ring. The Atom was used in stopping a gold shipment theft. The Metal Men brought in to stop terrorists in a sky-scrapper. ETC. If Archie wanted a conservative super hero range, I would make them like the 1970s DC and Marvel that told great stories under the Comics Code Authority. However, as we deal with the reality of the comic book industry marketplace, Archie may indeed be "desperate" for its survival. Or maybe they feel that they NEED to make a splash in today's market as opposed to a more conservative effort.
                              Prior to that last DC iteration of the Archie superheroes, DC had announced a relaunch of the characters by J. Michael Straczynski that would have teamed individual Archie superheroes up with iconic DC characters, in a sort of The Brave & the Bold format... I was really looking forward to that one (which seemed to stay close to the "classic" versions of the Crusaders), but for reasons unknown to me, it never happened. By the time DC did decide to reboot the characters, they'd lost a significant amount of goodwill on my part.

                              Originally posted by Blinky McQuade View Post
                              What is wrong with a comic marketed to "all-ages"? One of the best comics I ever bought as an adult was Batman Adventures based on the cartoon Batman: the Animated Series. The stories were serious and for all-ages not kids. Archie could have put out this type of Mighty Crusaders comic and maintained its wholesome reputation that it had been known for
                              That's exactly the type of superhero title Archie Comics DID try to put out. Blinky, did you just "blink" and miss NEW CRUSADERS: RISE OF THE HEROES? That was precisely the type of book you're describing. Not "written down" to little kids, but firmly "Rated G" for General Audiences (or "All Ages", as they like to call it now). That initial story arc played very much like a DCAU version of Roy Thomas's 1980s INFINITY INC., maintaining previous continuity with the 1960s and 1980s Mighty Comics/Red Circle characters (with the exception that they were now legally constricted from using the Fly, the copyright to that character having been recaptured by Joe Simon's estate), as the now elder statesman original Shield (Joe Higgins) assembled a team of young legacy heroes as the New Crusaders. A couple of other original Crusaders made an appearance in that arc, and presumably we would have seen other classic older heroes introduced one by one, if the series had continued. Well, you're not alone, that's about as much attention as the comic book marketplace in general paid to the relaunch of those characters. Of course, Stan Lee's MIGHTY 7 didn't inspire a whole lot of credibilty in that area a year or two before.

                              Originally posted by Blinky McQuade View Post
                              (of course if one read the original Hangman stories from the MLJ golden age era, one knows that this current take on the Black Hood is not that much of a stretch).
                              Yes. In some ways the early incarnation of the Hangman was very close to being "the Punisher with a rope instead of a gun". I'd have less trouble accepting a lethal, slightly off-the-rails version of Hangman than I would of Black Hood.
                              Last edited by pulphero; 12-15-2014, 01:22 AM.

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