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DC post-Convergence: Suddenly, I am intrigued.

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  • DC post-Convergence: Suddenly, I am intrigued.

    Suddenly, I'm intrigued.

    http://www.theouthousers.com/index.p...-relaunch.html

    This might be really good. Fingers crossed.

  • #2
    Looks like a few interesting possibilities. But who is the girl plowing the bubble and which Power Girl?
    Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
    Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
    http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

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    • #3
      Plowing the bubble?

      Here is another list...

      http://www.comicbookresources.com/?p...ticle&id=59090

      The ones I definitely will want to get are these, though what I can afford when they come out and what I will have to get later may vary:

      New/Rebranded Series

      Batman Beyond -- W: Dan Jurgens, A: Bernard Chang
      Bat-Mite (6-issue limited) -- W: Dan Jurgens, A: Corin Howell
      Bizarro (6-issue limited) -- W: Heath Corson, A: Gustavo Duarte
      Earth 2: Society -- W: Daniel Wilson, A: Jorge Jimenez
      Dr. Fate -- W: Paul Levitz, A: Sonny Liew
      Harley Quinn/Power Girl (6-issue limited) -- W: Jimmy Palmiotti & Amanda Conner, A: Stephane Roux
      Starfire -- W: Jimmy Palmiotti & Amanda Conner, A: Emanuela Lupacchino

      Ongoing Titles

      Action Comics -- W: Greg Pak, A: Aaron Kuder
      Batgirl -- W: Cameron Stewart & Brenden Fletcher, A: Babs Tarr
      Batman/Superman -- W: Greg Pak, A: Ardian Syaf
      Gotham Academy -- W: Becky Cloonan & Brenden Fletcher, A: Karl Kerschl
      Harley Quinn -- W: Jimmy Palmiotti & Amanda Conner, A: Chad Hardin
      Secret Six -- W: Gail Simone, A: Dale Eaglesham
      Superman -- W: Gene Luen Yang, A: John Romita, Jr. (OMG a writer I like! Thank you!)

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      • #4
        Yes a bubble. 5th picture down. When I went to save it, it was title Prez, so I guess that answers that question. The original Prez was a boy so I guess they're changing a few things.
        Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
        Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
        http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          They may be dropping the NEW 52 branding. Let's face it, they're not new, and now there are only 49 (including the miniseries).

          But that sure does look like the 2011-2014 Justice League on that cover, so... not a reboot, I'd say.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ghornet2 View Post
            Yes a bubble. 5th picture down. When I went to save it, it was title Prez, so I guess that answers that question. The original Prez was a boy so I guess they're changing a few things.
            The New Prez Is A Teenage Girl Elected By Twitter, And This Bizarro Is From Bizarroworld

            Comment


            • #7
              G'day,

              So now :


              "In this new era of storytelling, story will trump continuity as we continue to empower creators to tell the best stories in the industry," DiDio said in the announcement."

              Sounds like a confusing mess to me.

              Ralph


              From the announcement :

              http://www.comicbookresources.com/?p...ticle&id=59085

              DC Comics is overhauling its publishing line in June, and the message from the company is clear: An increased focus on diversity, reflected in creators, characters and storytelling styles. Twenty-five of the highest-profile existing series will remain, while 24 new series will be introduced, for a current total of 49 DC Universe titles -- meaning the end of "the New 52" branding, used since DC's reboot and relaunch in fall 2011.

              RELATED: EXCLUSIVE: First Details of New DC Series Including Hitch's "Justice League of America" and More

              In a high-profile move, Eisner-winning comics creator Gene Luen Yang, known for his graphic novels including "American Born Chinese" and "The Shadow Hero," will make his DC Comics debut by taking on writing duties on "Superman," joining current series artist John Romita Jr. Yang follows DC Chief Creative Officer Geoff Johns on the series.

              Additionally, long-time comics veteran Bryan Hitch, who illustrated multiple titles published by DC including "The Authority" and "JLA" before moving to Marvel, is returning to DC to write and draw a new "Justice League of America" series. The "Hitman" creative team of Garth Ennis and John McCrea are also back at DC, for the limited series "Section Eight," featuring characters originally introduced in "Hitman."

              Ming Doyle, currently artist on Vertigo series "The Kitchen," moves to writing duties in the DC Universe with "Constantine: The Hellblazer," which takes the place of "Constantine" in DC's publishing line, and adds the "Hellblazer" name from the character's Vertigo days. Riley Rossmo, a veteran of multiple series at Image Comics, will illustrate the series.


              Additional new titles announced by DC include a "Black Canary" book written by "Batgirl" co-writer Brenden Fletcher; "Starfire," written by the "Harley Quinn" team of Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti (who are also writing a new "Harley Quinn/Power Girl" series in addition to the solo "Harley Quinn"), "Cyborg," "Bizarro," "Bat-Mite" and "Prez;" the latter three of which are described by DC Entertainment Co-Publisher Jim Lee in the press release as "offbeat, irreverently funny titles."

              DC's press release announcing the new lineup stresses a progressive approach aimed at appealing to a wide range of fans. The words "inclusive" and "accessible" are used, with DC looking to target its "next generation of fans." These changes follow the two-month "Convergence" event running in April and May, coinciding with the move of DC's editorial department from New York City to Burbank, and featuring short stories drawing upon multiple aspects of DC history and continuity.

              "This heralds in a new era for the DC Universe which will allow us to publish something for everyone, be more expansive and modern in our approach and tell stories that better reflect the society around us," DC Entertainment Co-Publisher Dan DiDio said in the press release. "Whether you’ve been a DC fan your whole life, or whether you are new to comics -- there will be a book for you beginning in June."


              "Justice League" #40 cover.
              DC has also revealed the first details of its previously top-secret Free Comic Book Day offering. Titled "DC Comics: Divergence," it will feature three eight-page previews of upcoming stories: from Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo's "Batman," the launch of "Darkseid War" in Geoff Johns and Jason Fabok's "Justice League," and Gene Luen Yang's first "Superman" story with John Romita Jr. Free Comic Book Day 2015 happens Saturday, May 2.

              "In this new era of storytelling, story will trump continuity as we continue to empower creators to tell the best stories in the industry," DiDio said in the announcement.

              The 25 ongoing series set to continue in June, most with current creative teams, are: "Action Comics," "Aquaman," "Batgirl," "Batman," "Detective Comics," "Batman/Superman," "Catwoman," "Deathstroke," "The Flash," "Gotham Academy," "Gotham By Midnight," "Grayson," "Green Arrow," "Green Lantern," "Harley Quinn," "Justice League," "Justice League United," "Lobo," "Secret Six," "Sinestro," "New Suicide Squad," "Superman," "Superman/Wonder Woman," "Teen Titans" and "Wonder Woman."

              Keep reading CBR for much more on DC's new publishing initiative.

              UPDATE 2/6/2015 3:28 AM PT: IGN has word that "Green Lantern," from the team of Robert Venditti and artist Billy Tan, is also among the continuing series, bringing that number to 25, and the total of currently planned DC series to 49. The article has been edited to reflect that addition.

              Comment


              • #8
                Still not interested. And "story will trump continuity" is just a way of excusing lazy writers and editors who can't be bothered to keep things straight.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by tony ingram View Post
                  Still not interested. And "story will trump continuity" is just a way of excusing lazy writers and editors who can't be bothered to keep things straight.
                  There was bound to be an anti-continuity backlash. Comic books got along without it for a couple of decades before it came along, so what makes you think it's forever?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                    There was bound to be an anti-continuity backlash. Comic books got along without it for a couple of decades before it came along, so what makes you think it's forever?
                    "A couple of decades"?

                    I think the majority of readers these days are invested in continuity, whatever they read. This latest decision seems to me like a spectacularly bad idea.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by tony ingram View Post
                      "A couple of decades"?
                      The 1940s and 1950s?

                      "Continuity" in the sense that it's used by comic book fans today is largely the invention of Stan Lee in the 1960s, because continuity is mainly a function of having continued stories, and multiple titles in which the stories are related. Before that, a somewhat different version of "continuity" existed mainly in the serialized adventure strips in newspapers, but it was hardly treated as strictly.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                        The 1940s and 1950s?
                        We had original comics in the UK in the 1800s...
                        "Continuity" in the sense that it's used by comic book fans today is largely the invention of Stan Lee in the 1960s, because continuity is mainly a function of having continued stories, and multiple titles in which the stories are related. Before that, a somewhat different version of "continuity" existed mainly in the serialized adventure strips in newspapers, but it was hardly treated as strictly.
                        But it's what several generations of readers are used to now.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tony ingram View Post
                          But it's what several generations of readers are used to now.
                          Several generations of readers of Marvel and DC Comics, and some others. They're also used to continued stories and multiple interrelated titles, because that's the way Marvel and DC have marketed their comics for generations. Only slowly did those type of comics come to comprise the majority of comics published. Since those are the type of comics being offered, the readers been trained to want that continuity, and those are the ones remaining from generations past. Implicit in that assumption is that the readers have the continuity of decades as well. Newer readers tend to be more flexible and not hidebound by it. Readers who can't be bothered to keep track of continuity drift away to other things. It has the effect of eliminating casual, occasional readers.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tony ingram View Post
                            We had original comics in the UK in the 1800s...
                            It seems to me that the English comic papers that I'm aware of were much more akin to the Sunday comics supplements in American newspapers, only they were sold separately, not as a "bonus" that was an enticement to buy a package deal of news.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by tony ingram View Post
                              I think the majority of readers these days are invested in continuity, whatever they read. This latest decision seems to me like a spectacularly bad idea.
                              A lot of people have been dismayed by DC locking themselves into the New 52, which I think has helped the popularity of books set outside of that context (the digital-first Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman stories, Batman Beyond, Batman '66 and Wonder Woman '77, etc.). I don't think DC is planning to suddenly say, "This month in the main DCU, we're ignoring the events of last year!" so much as "Here are some stories that we think you'll like that aren't part of our main continuity." And honestly, I'm pleased with having options, if that's what they're doing. Ideally, with all of the multiversal brouhaha we're getting, some of them will even be on specific worlds they've lined up (or even, hopefully, on some of the worlds appearing in Convergence, like the pre-Flashpoint DCU).

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