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What time periods do you prefer your pulp-style comic books to take place?

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  • What time periods do you prefer your pulp-style comic books to take place?

    When do you prefer your pulp-style comic book adventures (like Shadow, Green Hornet, Spider, Black Bat, etc.) to take place?

    MAYBE IN:
    * 19th century (1800's), when you have much of the Victorian period, which might include appearances of icons like Sherlock Holmes. Plus it was a transition period where horses were a main source of transportation. But you also had the introductions of electricity, telephones, and the horseless carriage, among others.
    Any you could also go for a Steam Punk vibe as well.

    * 1920s - The Great War (WWI) had recently ended, so many of the adventure characters could be veterans of that. Plus, you had the Jazz Age and Prohibition, which brings on bootleggers and crime. And then there was that pesky stock market crash towards the end of the decade.

    * 1930s - Classic time in the U.S. for famous criminals like Dillinger, Bonnie & Clyde, etc. Also, people trying to deal with the Great Depression, while in Europe the beginnings of WWII were taking place.

    * early-to-mid 1940s (U.S. in WWII) - description says it all Nazis, spies, black market, and oh so much more!

    * post-WWII 1940s - What do you do when the great fight is over and the world is just returning to a supposedly peaceful period of rebuilding?

    * early 1950s - The Korean conflict and Communism . . .

    * late 1950s - sort of a Happy Days (TV show) period

    * 1960s - a lot happened then, including the Civil Rights movement here in the U.S., the hippy culture, prominent assassinations, etc.

    * 1970s - besides ugly clothes and the rise of disco near the end, think of the many gritty crime movies and TV shows, not to mention blaxploitation classics like Shaft, and the many kung fu films and TV shows that became popular in the 1970's. And in U.S. politics, we had Watergated, Tricky Dick resigning, and tons of government conspiracies.

    * or is the present-day 21st Century maybe more your style?

    Maybe it's because I'm "old", but I prefer having them set during the 1930s and early 1940s. A time that's period-appropriate to the origins of many of the characters, but also a time when it was less high tech. I love the older cars, the rotary dial telephones, the newspaper & radio dominance of the mass media, etc. I wasn't alive back then, but to me it feels right. Heck, I'd even love if they had companion "radio adventures" / audio programs of many of the characters.
    40
    19th century (1800's)
    0.00%
    0
    1920s
    7.50%
    3
    1930s
    30.00%
    12
    early-to-mid 1940s (U.S. in WWII)
    27.50%
    11
    post-WWII 1940s
    10.00%
    4
    1950s
    7.50%
    3
    1960s
    0.00%
    0
    present-day 21st century
    5.00%
    2
    other (please state when else)
    2.50%
    1
    doesn't matter to me
    10.00%
    4
    Last edited by MajorHoy; 06-19-2013, 08:36 PM.

  • #2
    NOTE: Don't forget, you can choose more than one time period in the poll.

    Poll has a limit of ten choices, so not everything may line up properly with time periods I mentioned in the original message.

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    • #3
      The 30's & 40's.

      Comment


      • #4
        this is the hardest question ever D:

        each era provides something interesting to the genre . . . I think that post-war stories (post any way) provide more interesting characters though.

        Comment


        • #5
          It doesn't matter to me as long as they're fun to read. I like having a mix of older and newer, it makes it feel like the classic heroes have successors.

          Comment


          • #6
            All in all it doesn't really matter to me much, but I do enjoy a nice mix-n-mash of titles ranging from the 30's/40's and in current times. As long as the book is well written and enjoyable to read than I don't really care what era the book takes place in, it just has to entertain me and make me want to come back for more which is something the pulp titles have all done since I've began reading them back in spring of 2012.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by md62 View Post
              The 30's & 40's.
              Yup! I like the 30's & 40's too! Classic!

              Comment


              • #8
                30's and 40's for sure. That's what I think of when I hear Pulp.

                Comment


                • #9
                  And so far, "1930s" and "early-to-mid 1940s (U.S. in WWII)" seem to have been the two most popular choices.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
                    And so far, "1930s" and "early-to-mid 1940s (U.S. in WWII)" seem to have been the two most popular choices.
                    I am going to select--"It does not matter to me" as I see a good Pulp-style character can fit iconically in any time period. Examples: Green Hornet will always be the iconic hero who pretends to be a super-villain to infiltrate the criminal organizations. The Shadow will always be the mysterious manipulator who will bring justice to those who need it. Doc Savage will always be the scientist who will travel anywhere to bring his cure to the criminal elements (always up on the latest innovative gadgets and techniques as well). Zorro will always be the hero that stands up for the downtrodden (I remember seeing a movie serial with a son or grandson of Zorro riding a motorcycle and having fights on top of semi trucks). Tarzan will always be the ultimate "green man" who stands for nature (and is the ultimate adventurer of lost civilizations). The Phantom in any era is the legendary hunter of the corrupt and pirates anywhere in the world. The Spider is always the master of men dealing out justice with his death-dealing guns leaving behind his seal of the Spider on the foreheads letting everyone (mob elements and the police) know he is out there. My point is that regardless of the time period, pulp-style heroes can fit in any time period.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I tend to like a lot of them set at the time they were created.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I tend to prefer those 1930s - 1940s years for what I tend to consider "pulp"-type heroes because it seems like a more exciting time to set those types of stories. You had the desperation of the Great Depression and a rise of gangsters like Bonnie & Clyde, Dillinger, etc.; at the end of the 1930s and into the 1940s you had WWII, so you can then throw spies and Nazis into the mix; and, quite frankly, I prefer those types of adventures without all the technology that's rampant in the late 20th / 21st century. Being able to Google information seems less exciting than the private eyes having to do all their legwork and everything, and cell phones make reaching people almost too easy.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Different time periods do offer different plot elements and M.O. adjustments. I too like the 1930s-1950s time periods. However, modern era 21st century stories can on occasion offer fans and potential new comic book readers access to these cool pulp-like characters. Besides, the Green Hornet's Kato is treated more of an equal or with more dignity in the modern versions (same can be true of better treatment of the Spider's Ram Singh). I propose that DE offer different time periods of the characters maybe in alternate formats/alternating mini-series. A mini-series of the Shadow alternating with a mini of the Shadow Now would be cool. Same with other pulp-icons.

                          DE just announced three spinoffs of the Legendary mini-series: Vampirella, Red Sonja, and the Green Hornet. I am planning on getting the Legendary: Green Hornet series. Not because it is set in the steampunk setting (although the cover designs of GH and Kato are pretty cool), but because I know that the Green Hornet and Kato will still be that iconic team of heroes that pretend to be super-criminals as part of their M.O.. I am hoping for more steampunk Phantom guest appearances in the series, maybe more steampunk versions of pulp-like icons like the Spider, the Shadow, and Doc Savage might appear in the series.
                          Last edited by Blinky McQuade; 11-19-2014, 03:58 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
                            I tend to prefer those 1930s - 1940s years for what I tend to consider "pulp"-type heroes because it seems like a more exciting time to set those types of stories. You had the desperation of the Great Depression and a rise of gangsters like Bonnie & Clyde, Dillinger, etc.; at the end of the 1930s and into the 1940s you had WWII, so you can then throw spies and Nazis into the mix; and, quite frankly, I prefer those types of adventures without all the technology that's rampant in the late 20th / 21st century. Being able to Google information seems less exciting than the private eyes having to do all their legwork and everything, and cell phones make reaching people almost too easy.
                            There was always something about setting stories in the recent historical past that appealed to me. Somehow it just makes the stories easier for me to believe than if all these fantastic things are taking place in the present day here-and-now, with high tech and all sorts of sci-fi space opera elements.

                            I guess it is just easier to convince yourself to believe in a "secret history" of the recent past (but before your own lifetime) than it is to look out the window and see a world so vastly different from the one presented in comic books set in the present time. The future or outer space adventures are easier to believe than "here and now" fantastic stories too, but they don't have that aspect of convincing historical details to create verisimilitude.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ChastMastr View Post
                              I tend to like a lot of them set at the time they were created.
                              Me too. You rarely see that with characters created after the 1940s, but it was one of the things that made Darwyn Cooke's New Frontier such a great concept.

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