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The Green Hornet series MEGATHREAD!

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    I thought some of you might get a kick out of these. They are pics of the radio cast in character.
    Attached Files
    Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
    Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
    http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

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    • Also the Green Hornet Staff

      Hornet Staff
      Attached Files
      Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
      Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
      http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

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      • Dang it, the final issue in the first ARC could have been a lot of fun if Smith could have restrained his need to turn to juvenile humour. Missed it by THAT much.

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        • Originally posted by comixfan1980 View Post
          The Green Hornet of yesteryear is exactly that, the Green Hornet of yesteryear.
          Exactly. There again, that's why there's a year one book out there; for people who want THAT type of character.

          In issue one, Reid is just a kid. There's probably about a 15 year gap between his first mission and his dad's last. Therefore, dad would have operated somewhere between 1980 and 1995. Along those lines, he will not behave like a character from the 60's TV show.

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          • Originally posted by DudeAtDynamite View Post
            Green Hornet Strikes' story is a 10 issue storyline with Brett and Golden Age #8 completes all Golden Age issues from 1940's, which is why it ends with #8.
            What does this mean:

            "THE GREEN HORNET STRIKES! #7 (OF 8/10)"

            Do you really not know how many issues it will run for still?

            Comment


            • The sales of Kevin Smith Green Hornet are so high because this was the first Green Hornet title that Dynamite released. As I pointed out before, the sales have dropped dramatically since the first issue.

              However, this discussion deals with Blood Ties (if you would care to look at the name of the discussion thread) and we don't know what the sales figures are yet. I suspect it isn't very high.

              It's not a matter of out with the old and in with the new. It's a matter of out with the good and in with the bad.

              I understand that Blood Ties deals with the television Hornet and not Britt jr. This book is supposed to deal with the old. His persona just doesn't match.



              Originally posted by comixfan1980 View Post
              The Green Hornet of yesteryear is exactly that, the Green Hornet of yesteryear. These days the casual comic book fan needs gritty and dark storytelling more so than the brains over brawn storytelling of back in GH's heyday, its unfortunate but I don't think that KS: Green Hornet would be selling nearly as well if it wasn't for the style of how the character is being written versus the way he was written 30-40 years ago. It's an "out with the old and in with the new" world these days and were lucky enough that companies are bringing back the "old" to make them "new" once again.

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              • Originally posted by Mr. Fantastic View Post
                The sales of Kevin Smith Green Hornet are so high because this was the first Green Hornet title that Dynamite released.
                Yet several months later, it's still the best seller.

                I think there are far more factors than just order of release. For one, Kevin Smith (right or wrong) is a more mainstream, marketable name than Matt Wagner. Also, the Year One era is a harder sell. In general, there isn't a lot of interest in books that take place in the 40's.

                You're dreaming if you think sales figures would be flipped if release schedules had been.

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                • I felt rather the same way myself. It is the climax of the story when any sensible writer would be amping up the tension, but Smith decided to toss in juvenile jokes every other page. it is almost like he was afraid to treat the story seriously ("People will laugh at me if I treat it seriously--I know, I'll make stupid adolescent jokes instead! That will show them all that I am 'in' on the fact that superheroes are essentially stupid!! How clever of me! Nobody has ever thought to do that before!")

                  Thank God Smith's run on this series is over. I honestly don't know why Kevin Smith has such a fan following because he has yet to do anything in his life to convince me that he is anything other than an adolescent moron.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Tulku View Post
                    I felt rather the same way myself. It is the climax of the story when any sensible writer would be amping up the tension, but Smith decided to toss in juvenile jokes every other page. it is almost like he was afraid to treat the story seriously ("People will laugh at me if I treat it seriously--I know, I'll make stupid adolescent jokes instead! That will show them all that I am 'in' on the fact that superheroes are essentially stupid!! How clever of me! Nobody has ever thought to do that before!")

                    Thank God Smith's run on this series is over. I honestly don't know why Kevin Smith has such a fan following because he has yet to do anything in his life to convince me that he is anything other than an adolescent moron.
                    I think it is more that it was originally a movie script than a comic book script that gives it a different pacing.

                    Comment


                    • The title is currently Dynamite's best seller. The sales trend indicates that won't hold true for much longer. The title also has the distinction of being the biggest loser in terms of loss sales.

                      Much of the interest in the Green Hornet was driven by nostalgia for the television program. It didn't have anything to do with who the writer was. When fans found out the book was nothing like that they dropped the title. What is left is, in large part, readers who are new to the Green Hornet.




                      Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
                      Yet several months later, it's still the best seller.

                      I think there are far more factors than just order of release. For one, Kevin Smith (right or wrong) is a more mainstream, marketable name than Matt Wagner.
                      Last edited by Mr. Fantastic; 12-05-2010, 12:39 AM.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Mr. Fantastic View Post
                        Much of the interest in the Green Hornet was driven by nostalgia for the television program.
                        What do you base this on? Give me one piece of evidence that this is the case.

                        Even if that were true, why do you assume that those people would be too dense to realize that there is more than one version of the book, and that the other version is more in tune with their expectations?

                        I love the lost sales comment too. Way to penalize the book for having the nerve to be successful out of the gates.
                        Last edited by Captain Canuck; 12-05-2010, 01:32 AM.

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                        • I have talked to a lot of people about the Green Hornet including friends and people at comic book conventions. They know the Green Hornet for the television program. I have not met anybody who has ever said anything good about the comic books or the upcoming movie.

                          You have to remember that the Green Hornet is not a comic book crime fighter. He was first broadcast on radio. Later he was updated and made more relevant to modern audiences when he was given a television program. The television program was excellent even by today's standards. This is the Green Hornet that fans know. They want the real thing not an imaginary version.



                          Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
                          What do you base this on? Give me one piece of evidence that this is the case.

                          Even if that were true, why do you assume that those people would be too dense to realize that there is more than one version of the book, and that the other version is more in tune with their expectations?

                          I love the lost sales comment too. Way to penalize the book for having the nerve to be successful out of the gates.

                          Comment


                          • Where I have a hard time buying that is that the show aired for all of one season in the late 60's. That would indicate that strong sales based on nostalgia for it would be propelled by people in their early 50's and I don't know that this is the primary comic book buying market.

                            I also don't see what prevents that same nostalgia from translating to sales for Year One when that book is clearly closer in tone to the TV show. This assumes that people tuned out after seeing Smith's version and didn't give this other book a try. So nostalgia for the TV show lasted a few decades, but not for the extra two months it would have taken to give Wagner's a sales boost.

                            And I don't know how you dismiss Kevin Smith's name recognition as a sales factor.

                            Also, as an FYI, I found the sales figures (probably estimates) for Kato origins #1.

                            http://www.comichron.com/monthlycomi...0/2010-04.html

                            13,172. We saw that in the space of issues it dipped to about 7100.

                            Year One sold 21,332 of its first issue. Issue six sold 10,647. So in either case, half the people who bought them stopped within six issues.

                            KSGH, by now a known quantity, dipped below Boys but still sold over 19,000 of issue eight. At some point, you have to just accept that it is the more marketable of the two versions.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Chiclo View Post
                              I think it is more that it was originally a movie script than a comic book script that gives it a different pacing.
                              It's more of a content issue than a pacing issue for me. There were times that it "felt" like a movie (the early part of the issues certainly did for me) but that's hardly a bad thing.

                              Right from issue one, I didn't like that THAT Hornet laughed off some pretty clear danger. If the character isn't scared, how can I be scared for the character? So here we have the Hornet dangling from the side of a building and cracking jokes about it. Kills any sort of suspense.

                              The only positive I see from the immature reaction to Kato's hints at lesbianism is that hopefully it'll prevent a romantic relationship between the Hornet and Kato. Personally, I'd rather there be a strong friendship built there rather than a romantic one.

                              Bring on Phil Hester! I suspect his spin on the character will be far more...logical.

                              Comment


                              • The Green Hornet aired for one season in the sixties, but it has been in reruns off and on ever since. It wasn't limited to just one year. I know someone much younger than that who watched the program. Bruce Lee fans are well aware that he played the part of Kato as well.

                                I don't see how you can say that Kevin Smith's name attracted readers to buy the comic book. You posted messages yourself saying that you didn't like his writing style.

                                Year One was set in the forties and is kind of antiquated. The Green Hornet by Kevin Smith is more marketable because it is contemporary. However, it lacks a lot of the qualities of the television program.

                                Dynamite didn't do a good job of advertising Kato Origins. It over exposed the Green Hornet and Kato and diluted the market. It's possible that readers prefer to wait and buy the TPB of a limited series. One thing, I thought about Kato Origins from the beginning is that the racist remarks might drive a certain segment of the readers away. Although, it is an excellent book



                                Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
                                Where I have a hard time buying that is that the show aired for all of one season in the late 60's.

                                I also don't see what prevents that same nostalgia from translating to sales for Year One when that book is clearly closer in tone to the TV show.

                                And I don't know how you dismiss Kevin Smith's name recognition as a sales factor.

                                Also, as an FYI, I found the sales figures (probably estimates) for Kato origins #1.

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