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The Green Hornet series MEGATHREAD!

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  • Originally posted by Ghornet2 View Post
    Now I'm down to Astro City which I'm not sure even counts because it's not at all connected to the New 52.
    Or maybe it doesn't count because it wasn't rebooted, just renumbered.

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    • Originally posted by Ghornet2 View Post
      Crisis did pretty good because most of the characters weren't that different.
      I did get tired of being told that such and such a story did happen, but instead of character A it was character B because A was erased during crisis though. That got old.

      And as much as it might seem that I'm defending DC, I'm not really. People can like what they want, I just don't agree with that particular criticism because the company has a history of at least similar treatment, whether with one character or with many at a time. Perhaps it wasn't quite clear enough that Flashpoint would lead to this so it ended up a bigger surprise than it should be, too (unlike Zero Hour or Crisis which were clearly building up to something).

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      • Originally posted by pulphero View Post
        Or maybe it doesn't count because it wasn't rebooted, just renumbered.
        And that might be a big part of the jolt that fans got too. Maybe if books, especially your Detective and Action comics, continued from their original numbering, it wouldn't have felt like so much "newness" at once. Maybe that's why Zero Hour didn't get (as far as I know) the same kind of backlash. They did the zero issue bit to adjust origins then moved on.

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        • Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
          And that might be a big part of the jolt that fans got too. Maybe if books, especially your Detective and Action comics, continued from their original numbering, it wouldn't have felt like so much "newness" at once. Maybe that's why Zero Hour didn't get (as far as I know) the same kind of backlash. They did the zero issue bit to adjust origins then moved on.
          Well, at the very least it's a much more definite 'dividing line' which serves as a bookmark. In making it easy for new readers to start, DC made it very easy for old readers to stop. Marvel's continuity shifts tend to be a lot more fuzzy, at least in the context of the big picture. That and the crazy and constant obsession with renumbering old series every couple of years. That said, I'd been reading less and less Marvels even before the DC reboot, and that continued to be the case afterward. The DC reboot just sort of forced me to reexamine the reasons I was so obsessed with superhero universe comics in the first place. A lot of that is bound up with nostalgia, comfort and familiarity. Combined with the increasing number and availability of comics in different styles and genres, and reprints from different eras of comics history, and the availability of English-language translations of Japanese and European comics, it made me look back and realize I'd undervalued some of these other things, and that an over-reliance on reading superhero comics sort of presents a distorted prism of the breadth and depth of the comics medium as a whole. When you realize you'll never have time to read everything out there, you want to spend your time and money on things that aren't the 'same-old, same-old', and have different styles, perspectives and concerns. You can get all the basic nutrition you need in the most convenient way possible by eating at McDonalds and Burger King, and you can enjoy what's on their menu, but there's certainly a cornucopia of culinary delights to be found by broadening your horizons to include all sorts of restaurants with all sorts of different menus, even if they are a little harder to get to, or a little more expensive - you just need to be open to it, and willing to experiment and experience unfamiliar tastes. Even so, McDonalds will always be there when you get a hankering for the familar taste of a Big Mac.

          There's a wealth of resources available to educate yourself about these different things, much more so now with the internet and books which by and large didn't exist 10 or 20 years ago. One such book that absolutely amazed me with the variety and array of titles spotlighted was Paul Gravett's 1001 COMICS YOU MUST READ BEFORE YOU DIE. Tony Isabella wrote a similar book (1000 Comics You Must Read) with a much more limited palette of choices a few years ago, but while Tony's choices were eclectic, it just can't compete with Paul Gravett's book. Drawing on 67 expert editorial contributors from 27 different countries, Gravett leaves no stone unturned, covering about 120 years of history in short entries one or two to a page, covering every publishing format, and not limiting his choices to what's currently and conveniently available in English. This would make great bathroom reading, the entries are short but interesting, but page turning does become addictive. You've probably only heard of about 25-35% of the titles cited, and read maybe half of those or less.

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          • Originally posted by Ghornet2 View Post
            To true. I mean didn't somebody (Dell?) try and do superhero verions of the classic Universal monsters (Dracula, Frankenstien etc.)?
            That was Dell.





            They probably rate right up there with the Archie Comics version of The Shadow.

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            • I've recently been reading the American Comic Book Chronicles, published by TwoMorrows. Each hardcover volume of slightly less than 300 pages typically covers a single decade, but when it came the 1960s, they needed to publish two (one for 1960-1964, one for 1965-1969). These books are great because they really give you the Big Picture of U.S. comics history. Each chapter covers a single year in a more-or-less chronological accounting of ALL of the comic book publishers active at that time. Not just the "important" and popular companies and genres, and most significant characters and milestone events; but the ill-timed coulda-beens, the inspired but underappreciated shoulda-beens, the near-misses and epic failures, the oddballs and the long-forgottens, and the "What were they thinking?"s.

              EVERYONE, and I mean everyone, wanted a slice of that superhero American Pie that Marvel and DC were serving up in the sixties. Existing publishers like ACG, Archie, Charlton, Dell, Gold Key and Harvey all jumped to create superhero books, and new companies like Tower, MF Enterprises, Parallax, and Milson cropped up like mushrooms to cash in on the craze. Whether it was attributed to Pop Art, Camp, or Nostalgia, the explosion of superheroes produced was unlike anything seen since the first publishers reacted to the initial success of Action Comics and Superman. Nearly all of these superheroes hit the spinner racks between 1965 and 1966, and all of them were gone by the end of 1968.

              And boy were there some stinkers in there. Publishers would take a cursory glance at the Stan Lee Marvel Comics that were coming on like sales gangbusters, seemingly from out of nowhere, and think they could identify exactly how to mimic their style. Then they discovered it wasn't so easy. About the only existing publisher that didn't jump on the bandwagon was Jim Warren. But since he was avoiding the Comics Code Authority by publishing black and white horror magazines, he probably figured out that whatever their popularity, superheroes weren't going to work for him with his distribution system.
              Last edited by pulphero; 05-19-2014, 03:59 AM.

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              • Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                . . . About the only existing publisher that didn't jump on the bandwagon was Jim Warren. But since he was avoiding the Comics Code Authority by publishing black and white horror magazines, he probably figured out that whatever their popularity, superheroes weren't going to work for him with his distribution system.
                What I really loved from those Warren magazines was the one that reprinted Will Eisner's The Spirit stories.

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                • Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
                  What I really loved from those Warren magazines was the one that reprinted Will Eisner's The Spirit stories.
                  But it might not have happened without the 2 issues published in 1966 and 1967 by Harvey Comics, which Leon Harvey got the idea to reprint when he saw a new 5-page Eisner Spirit story that ran in January 6, 1966 issue of The New York Herald Tribune. That issue of the Tribune had a special theme of "The Great Comics Revival", and Jules Feiffer contributed the centerpiece essay, in effect a coda to his book The Great Comic Book Heroes, that had been published less than two months earlier, which had contained the first reprinted Spirit story. Marilyn Mercer, a writer for the Tribune (and, like Feiffer, an ex-assistant of Eisner's), prevailed upon the reluctant Eisner to contribute a new Spirit story to the issue. The Harvey reprints led to 2 underground issues published by Kitchen Sink Comix in 1973, then to Warren in 1974. Unfortunately it was not one of their better selling black & white magazines, even though Jim Warren loved it, and with sales on all the Warren titles ebbing, The Spirit #16 (Oct. 1976) was the last published by Warren. Denis Kitchen, Eisner's most indefatigable fan, again took up the crusade to keep The Spirit alive. Kitchen Sink took over the Warren numbering with #17 (Winter '77) and kept the character in print in one form or another for 15 years, slightly beating out The Spirit's original run as a newspaper comic book supplement from 1940 to 1952. Kitchen was also the first to publish hardcover and trade paperback collections of The Spirit.

                  A very odd legacy to "The Great Superhero Glut of 1965-66". The Joe Simon-edited "Harvey Thriller" conglomeration of short-lived superhero titles and one-shots was the strangest mix of all, containing work by Eisner, Simon & Kirby, Steve Ditko, Wally Wood, Gil Kane, and Al Williamson, and characters created (but not written or drawn) by Steranko. But they were all smothered in a sea of (to put it circumspectly) "lesser talents". Despite the few gems buried among the dross, the Harvey Thriller line (excepting Eisner's Spirit reprints and the one-shot Fighting American reprint) is probably held in lower esteem by comics fandom than any major company of the time but Dell. Ironically, usually imperturbable Marvel Comics publisher Martin Goodman is said to have panicked when he heard the news that Simon was going to edit a superhero line of comics for Harvey. At the time, Joe Simon was still considered in the industry as a sharp businessman and one of the savviest of comics editors. All of this being before he went on to DC to create such memorable flops as Brother Power the Geek, The Green Team, and The Outsiders.
                  Last edited by pulphero; 05-19-2014, 10:36 PM.

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                  • Just got and read Mark Waid's Green Hornet #12 this week.



                    Another great issue . . . I believe the final issue (#13) is currently expected to be released June 25th?

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                    • I hope I'm not reading too much into this, but it does sort of feel like the end of an era. First The Spider, Lone Ranger, Miss Fury, Warlord of Mars: Dejah Thoris and Warlord of Mars, and the ongoing Shadow. Then The Shadow NOW, then Green Hornet, then The Shadow Year One, then Doc Savage.

                      True, we have the start of the new Shadow: Midnight in Moscow mini, and coming soon, Justice Inc. and Dejah of Mars. But we're losing 10, and only getting 3 (that we know of) to replace them. Kind of seems like a drastic cutback. I didn't even count the 1 for 1 replacements (Lady Zorro replaces Lady Rawhide, Flash Gordon replaces Kings Watch).
                      Last edited by pulphero; 05-25-2014, 05:19 PM.

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                      • DA: Will we see more from Green Hornet and Mark Waid? If so, where are they going next?

                        MW: No plans immediately, but I don’t feel “done” with him yet. In the meantime, Dynamite’s giving me the chance to explore some of these same themes with another character…but that’s revealing too much. Stay tuned.
                        Please be Black Bat, please be Black Bat, please be Black Bat.

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                        • Dynamite’s giving me the chance to explore some of these same themes with another character…

                          Um, could it be... Doctor Spektor?

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                          • Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                            Dynamite’s giving me the chance to explore some of these same themes with another character…

                            Um, could it be... Doctor Spektor?
                            Um, probably not, since his work on that character is common knowledge and every issue has been solicited.

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                            • Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
                              Um, probably not, since his work on that character is common knowledge and every issue has been solicited.
                              He didn't say the *character* was a secret, but maybe he can't talk about the themes of the series without giving away too much of the story.

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                              • Mark Waid's The Green Hornet #13 (Final Issue)


                                Shipping: Available Soon!
                                Related Products:

                                SKU: C72513020289513011
                                Rating: Teen +
                                Covers: Paolo Rivera
                                Writer: Mark Waid
                                Art: Ronilson Freire
                                Genre: Super-Hero, Adventure
                                Publication Date: Apr 2014
                                Format: Comic Book
                                Page Count: 32 pages
                                UPC: 725130202895 13011
                                ON SALE DATE: April 16
                                FINAL ISSUE!!! The grand finale--and the ultimate victor stands bloodied but unbowed! Will it be Britt Reid--or the Green Hornet?
                                http://www.dynamite.com/htmlfiles/vi...13020289513011

                                As for when it's actually coming out, comiclist.com currently has it expected 6/25/2014.

                                And, here's the Jonathan Lau Subcription Variant cover:

                                http://www.tfaw.com/Comics/Profile/M...nt%29___447124

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