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  • The Shadow #18

    Holy Christ what a great issue! I loved the flashback scenes followed by the epic encounter on the rooftop between The Shadow and The Light, it really was a wonderful set-up for what's to come. The two engage in what can only be said as an amazing battle before stopping to chat a bit and then it was right back into the thick of things. The ending was EXACTLY what I wanted and I'm hoping she's still out there somewhere because she's one of the BEST female villains of all-time!

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    • Loved it! Easily the best issue in this arc, hope we get to see her again!

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      • Matt Wagner Talks Steaks, Pulps And The Evil The Lurks In The Hearts Of Men @ BC

        Full text of the article can be found here:
        http://www.bleedingcool.com/2013/10/...hearts-of-men/

        But the essence of Matt Wagner's philosophy of writing The Shadow is captured in this one paragraph:

        AG: What can we expect from the Shadow Year One? How does your take differ from some of the more recent issues?

        MW: First and foremost, I consider it vitally important that we never get inside The Shadow’s head. I know some of the writers on the continuing series have worked with The Shadow’s internal monologue in the captions and I think that’s a huge mistake. Part of what makes this character so great is his mysterious aura and the fact that he’s almost beyond the scope of we mere mortals. And, certainly, that’s those various authors’ prerogative, but I prefer to keep The Shadow at a bit of a distance so as to regard him with a bit more awe rather than familiarity—much the same as way Conan Doyle did by having Sherlock Holmes’ adventures narrated by Dr. Watson. To be inside of Holmes’ head would sap him of all his mythic grandeur and I take the same attitude with The Shadow.

        I couldn't agree more. The Shadow should be a character of inscrutability, and larger-than-life, almost a force of nature. The minute we start understanding all his motivations and begin to relate to him as a human being, "The Shadow" is lost. When we understand how he thinks and feels, we can question the ethics and morality of his methods, his infallibility in always "knowing", and his ability to inspire awe and mystery in the reader goes out the window. That's something that Garth Ennis, and to an extent, Victor Gischler, never really 'got'.

        I'm digging the Year One so far.

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        • The Shadow #19

          I was surprised to see a new artist (whose name already escapes me, but I like it) on The Shadow this issue. Not sure if this is a fill-in (Timpano is still credited in the solicitation for both #19 and upcoming issues in this story arc), but I wouldn't mind seeing this artist continue.

          On the writing front, Chris Roberson seems to be getting into a comfortable groove now. I approve of his continuing to filter more of the Shadow's agents like Moe Shrevnitz and Burbank into his stories, and was that Jericho Druke I saw dropping a letter into "B. Jonas"s mail slot? I like the narration of the story by Margo. The Shadow should NEVER narrate his own story from the first person perspective. Also appreciated the subtle references Roberson drops in the conversation between Gayle and Margo on page 2. For anyone that missed it, the "Nora" Gayle refers to as married is undoubtedly Nora Charles (married to Nick Charles, aka "The Thin Man"). And the "Dian" that Margo refers to would be Dian Belmont, paramour of Wesley Dodds (aka The Sandman, last seen in Matt Wagner's Sandman Mystery Theater from Vertigo). Nice touch.

          But curiouser and curiouser... in this issue, The Shadow discovers a box containing a severed finger wearing a duplicate of The Shadow's own girasol. Which caused me to experience my own "WTF?!" moment this week, as some of you may recall that just a couple of weeks ago, in The Shadow/Green Hornet: Dark Nights #5, The Shadow shot off Shiwan Khan's finger wearing an identical girasol to his own. Now in issue #19 of his own series, here he is finding just such a severed finger with just such a ring! Now, I very much doubt that Chris Roberson had read a copy of Michael Uslan's script for TSGHDN#5 prior to writing his own script, so what a weird coincidence! Great minds think alike?!
          Last edited by pulphero; 11-22-2013, 09:59 AM.

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          • The Shadow: 1941 Preview from Comics Alliance

            http://comicsalliance.com/denny-onei...cades-preview/

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            • This is such a great GN. I have my copy from when it originally was released (it was originally going to be called "Hitler's Astrologer"). WONDERFUL stuff.

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              • Hated the art . . . nobody is drawing Shadow/Cranston's nose properly, and where was his cloak this issue?!? Why did it look like he just had a black leather jacket and a long red scarf that any moron could grab on to?

                Margo seemed to have blonde hair this issue, but isn't it usually more to the brown side? And were her "debutante days" in Boston, Chicago, or wherever the writer wants to make them?

                Not a very satisfying effort this issue.

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                • The Shadow #19 was great, as per usual, but with The Light storyline where does our hero go from here? So much to discover and so many great plots await, I can't help but to wonder where our hero will take us?
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                  • Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
                    Hated the art . . . nobody is drawing Shadow/Cranston's nose properly, and where was his cloak this issue?!? Why did it look like he just had a black leather jacket and a long red scarf that any moron could grab on to?

                    Margo seemed to have blonde hair this issue, but isn't it usually more to the brown side?
                    I always have to guess, based on the dialogue, which character is supposed to be Margo. Talk about a lack of artistic consistency! She never dresses in the same style or has the same style or color hair. Every artist draws her differently.

                    That's also true to some extent of the Shadow, and mostly lately I've noticed that they've been dispensing with the cape (which varied, when drawn, from long to short, and red-lined or not). Seems most artists are going with the long topcoat and just the red scarf. The lack of a cape bothers me less than the chameleonic quality of Margo's appearance.

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                    • mystery novel series

                      Hi some of you wonder why I post here about my idea for a mystery novel series, well the main character is a Pulp Writer in New York city and since most of the major Pulp Writers of the day work in this same city it would make sense that they would meet and talk and gripe.

                      I would like to point out some of these Writers by are standards were Nerds, and that not only were they screwed out of there royalties and bullied by there editors as well but I could be wrong on this.


                      The Novel series starts in the 1930's and his partner is a New York Detective who isn't a big fan of Pulp Magazines I know for a fact that these type of stories weren't considered at the time proper reading, they were treated much in same way as tabloids are today.


                      LW

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                      • W

                        Great idea... but Paul Malmont beat you to it.

                        The Chinatown Death Cloud Peril (2007)

                        The Astounding, The Amazing, and The Unknown (2011)

                        But don't feel too bad. Philip Jose Farmer beat Malmont to the idea as far back as 1977, with his version of a team-up between Walter Gibson and Lester Dent, in the short story "The Savage Shadow".

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                        • Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                          Great idea... but Paul Malmont beat you to it.

                          The Chinatown Death Cloud Peril (2007)

                          The Astounding, The Amazing, and The Unknown (2011)

                          But don't feel too bad. Philip Jose Farmer beat Malmont to the idea as far back as 1977, with his version of a team-up between Walter Gibson and Lester Dent, in the short story "The Savage Shadow".

                          There was a cool episode of Star Trek Deep Space Nine where Captain Ben Sisko was a pulp writer writing about his Space Station getting some criticism from his boss being an African American writer.

                          Pulps were cool--then and now. This is the reason why I am drawn to the DE line of comics.

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                          • I know that Paul Malmont beat to the punch, but each has the main writing part of his Pulp vigilante character, snipets of his latest story that he going to submit.


                            I again would like to point out that people like the New York police detective considered writing Pulps not real work, also my main character in each novel points a Pulp Magazine story that can help solve his murder case since most of the stories are Crime Drama.


                            LW

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                            • Originally posted by Blinky McQuade View Post
                              There was a cool episode of Star Trek Deep Space Nine where Captain Ben Sisko was a pulp writer writing about his Space Station getting some criticism from his boss being an African American writer.

                              Pulps were cool--then and now. This is the reason why I am drawn to the DE line of comics.
                              Besides DS9, ST:TNG had the pulp/noir-inspired character of Dixon Hill (played by Jean-Luc Picard in a holodeck adventure), and ST:Voyager had the pulp/serial-inspired SF hero Captain Proton (played in a holodeck adventure by Tom Paris). It was nice to see stuff like that in the later Trek series, since it reminded me of TOS when they'd go to a planet and have gangster (A Piece of the Action) or western stories (Spectre of the Gun).

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                              • The Shadow #21

                                Chris Roberson is really cooking with this storyline. It may be his best for Dynamite yet. I like that the individual chapters of The Shadow's 'world tour' work both as single-issue stories and as puzzle pieces containing hints to The Shadow's past, and that they are connected in some way to the mystery of the girasol's twin that The Shadow found in New York. Giovanni Timpani's art is serviceable enough for the most part, he seems to do fine with most of the incidental characters and local backdrop to the stories, and I like the little local adaptations to The Shadow's outfit, but somehow overall I just don't find his depiction of The Shadow very impressive. It just lacks 'oomph' somehow. Otherwise really enjoying this story.

                                I wonder what happened to The Shadow Year One. Issue #6 came out at the end of October. I see where the ship date of #7 has been revised to 1/29. That's 3 months between issues; a long time to wait.

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