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who else is publishing these pulp heroes currently?

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  • who else is publishing these pulp heroes currently?

    Who else is putting out pulp comics these days, or recently?

  • #2
    Mainly Dark Horse Comics. They have Lobster Johnson (or just The Lobster, as he's actually referred to in the stories themselves), an original character, but one whose identity and origins are a mystery, and follows firmly in the mold of such pulp vigilantes of the 1930s as The Shadow and The Spider. Then there's Captain Midnight (more of a revival of a Golden Age superhero, his adventures now taking place in the present), and Black Beetle (another original character, created by Francesco Francavilla, kind of a hybrid of a pulp hero and a Golden Age non-powered costumed character, one that incorporates influences from old time radio and movie serials, too). The latter character is currently scheduled for a second miniseries, that seems to have been delayed for reasons unexplained, but you can still pick up his first series or the collected edition book.

    Beyond that, there's not a lot out there worth noting. Moonstone Books used to publish The Phantom before Dynamite got hold of him, ditto for The Spider (theirs was more in the original 1930s mode), along with Domino Lady, the first (and only) female pulp vigilante. Some of those comics may still be available from Moonstone. Lately they've been pretty quiet on the comic front, other than a recent comic reviving Golden Age jungle girl Sheena, Queen of the Jungle.

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    • #3
      IDW had been doing Rocketeer, which is set in the 1930s - 1940s era and has a bit of sci-fi / pulp feel to it.

      They even had a four-issue crossover story with the Rocketeer and the Spirit called "Pulp Friction"; it was written by Mark Waid.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
        IDW had been doing Rocketeer, which is set in the 1930s - 1940s era and has a bit of sci-fi / pulp feel to it.

        They even had a four-issue crossover story with the Rocketeer and the Spirit called "Pulp Friction"; it was written by Mark Waid.
        Good point. Can't remember if they issued trade paperbacks on the IDW Rocketeer series yet, since they originally released them in hardcover. But definitely not to be missed (if it's still in print from IDW) is the original Rocketeer series by Dave Stevens (which I think had both regular TPB and deluxe hardcover versions, along with a giant 'Absolute' [as DC would call them] edition).

        I think DC still has trade paperbacks available of its original stories of The Spirit, both the Darwyn Cooke series and the later First Wave series by David Hine and Moritat (unfortunately only Volume 1 ["Angel Smerti"] of the First Wave title; they never collected the later issues). Most of the DC hardcovers of Will Eisner's Spirit Archives are still available, although I did some checking and volumes 12, 14, & 16 [the early post-War Eisner] have gone out of print at this point. Oh, and Dark Horse published a hardcover volume of The Spirit: The New Adventures (containing the the original non-Eisner stories from the 1990s Kitchen Sink series) in its Dark Horse Archives series to match the DC trade dress.
        Last edited by pulphero; 06-01-2014, 01:17 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by pulphero View Post
          Mainly Dark Horse Comics. They have Lobster Johnson (or just The Lobster, as he's actually referred to in the stories themselves), an original character, but one whose identity and origins are a mystery, and follows firmly in the mold of such pulp vigilantes of the 1930s as The Shadow and The Spider . . .
          I just picked up issues #1 and #2 of Get the Lobster this afternoon when I did my comic book run . . . I'm curious to see how well they read.



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          • #6
            Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
            I just picked up issues #1 and #2 of Get the Lobster this afternoon when I did my comic book run . . . I'm curious to see how well they read.



            That series is fun, as were his other mini's. He's just a great character all in all.
            Dynamite Entertainment
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            • #7
              PH's mention of Domino Lady reminds me that Ron Fortier is writing a Black Bat/Domino Lady book for Moonstone. Here's a portion of a blog entry from February.

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              Moving right along, for those of you who faithfully follow this Log every week, you'll remember that a few short weeks ago we wrote a particularly mean rant against Licensors and how they are forever screwing over creative people. Well, the reasoning behind that entry was we had just learned that the Licensor of the Spider had opted cancel Moonstone Comics permission to use this classic pulp character right smack in the middle of our producing the new black and white SPIDER - DOMINO LADY comic series. Needless to say all of involved were both surprised and then justifiably angry with this stupid action on their part. Still it left us with the question as to how to proceed. Or should we? Happily, in the end, the Air Chief, Moonstone's Managing Editor and artist Michael Dorman all agreed to save the project by swapping out the Spider for another classic pulp hero who is 100% public domain. Meaning we don't have to kowtow to any idiotic licensors and can do as we please.

              Get ready for THE BLACK BAT - DOMINO LADY comic series!! Yup, the Air Chief did a little tweaking where necessary and the hooded avenger of the classic pulps is once again on the trail of evil doers. Note, the page above by Michael and you'll see we are doing the original costume as was described in the actual Black Bat stories...and not the Batman-like cowl that was splashed on the covers and has been adopted by other comic companies. Nope, we wanted to give you fans the real-deal here. We are excited by Michael's' art as ever and can't wait to see this project move forward.

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              • #8
                Is Moonstone's quality any good?

                I got a Captain Action special of there's once in a $1.00 bin and wasn't exactly impressed.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
                  Is Moonstone's quality any good?

                  I got a Captain Action special of there's once in a $1.00 bin and wasn't exactly impressed.
                  Well, you can probably imagine that the artwork isn't some of the best you'll find in comics today. If Dynamite's page rate for artists is below what Marvel, DC, and Dark Horse can offer, then Moonstone's page rates are a tier below Dynamite's. So you're going to get a lot of newbies trying to break into the industry.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
                    I just picked up issues #1 and #2 of Get the Lobster this afternoon when I did my comic book run . . . I'm curious to see how well they read.
                    This isn't a bad place to start reading the Lobster, actually. Nothing was revealed in previous series regarding the character's true identity or origins, and the running subplot here is that a female investigative reporter is trying to dredge up information about the Lobster's past (not sure if that will result in any concrete findings, or just open-ended 'possibles').

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                    • #11
                      Ah, just thought of one that hasn't been mentioned. From a few years back (2011), Mystery Men by David Liss (who wrote The Spider for Dynamite) and Patrick Zircher. That and J. Michael Straczynski & Chris Weston's The Twelve (present-day revival of 12 obscure Golden Age Timely characters) are probably some of the last genre material of this type you'll ever see from Marvel. Also from 2009-10, The Marvels Project by Ed Brubaker and Steve Epting, (in case you were living under a rock back in 2010 or something).

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                      Last edited by pulphero; 06-05-2014, 02:27 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                        Ah, just thought of one that hasn't been mentioned. From a few years back (2011), Mystery Men by David Liss (who wrote The Spider for Dynamite) and Patrick Zircher. That and J. Michael Straczynski & Chris Weston's The Twelve (present-day revival of 12 obscure Golden Age Timely characters) are probably some of the last genre material of this type you'll ever see from Marvel. Also from 2009-10, The Marvels Project by Ed Brubaker and Steve Epting, (in case you were living under a rock back in 2010 or something).
                        Or, in my case, not visiting comic book shops. When I first started to ease my way back into comic books, I was only going to nearby Barnes & Noble and Borders locations to buy comic books, so selection was a bit more limited to some of the DC and Marvel books, as well as some Dark Horse and Archie (newsstand distribution). I heard about some of the other stuff, but didn't get a chance to buy single issues.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
                          Is Moonstone's quality any good?

                          I got a Captain Action special of there's once in a $1.00 bin and wasn't exactly impressed.
                          I wasn't crazy about their Black Bat / Death Angel double shot. I try to be open-minded about different interpretations but that one didn't do it for me. Had a whole psycho thing going where he hears another voice or some such. Ths one seems more like the classic version and if Ron fortier is writing, I think he's pretty reliable so I'll get it for certain.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
                            Or, in my case, not visiting comic book shops. When I first started to ease my way back into comic books, I was only going to nearby Barnes & Noble and Borders locations to buy comic books, so selection was a bit more limited to some of the DC and Marvel books, as well as some Dark Horse and Archie (newsstand distribution). I heard about some of the other stuff, but didn't get a chance to buy single issues.
                            Then there's 3 must-reads for you: 1 pseudo-pulp, 1 Golden Agers 'suspended animation' story, and 1 WWII prequel to Marvels. I kinda figured the last one as not flying below the radar of anyone remotely interested in Golden Age superheroes, since it was kind of the high-profile centerpiece of Marvel's 70th Anniversary. I nearly didn't mention it.
                            Last edited by pulphero; 06-05-2014, 11:59 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
                              I wasn't crazy about their Black Bat / Death Angel double shot. I try to be open-minded about different interpretations but that one didn't do it for me. Had a whole psycho thing going where he hears another voice or some such. Ths one seems more like the classic version and if Ron fortier is writing, I think he's pretty reliable so I'll get it for certain.
                              Ron Fortier already assembled a couple of volumes of a prose anthology of new Black Bat stories called Black Bat Mystery.

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