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Who is your favorite pulp hero?

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  • #16
    Sounds neat, I'll have to try it!

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    • #17
      i can't single out one hero over the others. i love some more than others of course. but my guys are The Shadow, Doc Savage, Green Hornet, Tarzan and the Phantom.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by GreenHornet0415 View Post
        Check out my podcast review of the issue for the answer to that question!
        Golly gee! Awesome podcast, man. I'll be checking out the previous entries.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Lobster Johnson View Post
          I was wondering who the most popular pulp hero among us die-hard fans of pulp is. I would guess the most popular is the Shadow, followed by GH (my favorite).
          Four months later and Green Hornet has a one vote lead over The Shadow, The Spider, and Black Bat.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
            Four months later and Green Hornet has a one vote lead over The Shadow, The Spider, and Black Bat.
            Doc Savage
            followed by the Spider
            John Carter, Warlord of Mars

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            • #21
              For the characters that actually HAD pulp magazine stories, the comic book stories have rarely (if ever) matched the greatness of the characters as they appeared in their prose fiction stories, as written by the writers who defined those characters (Walter Gibson, Lester Dent, Paul Ernst, Norvell Page, Johnston McCulley). That goes for the newspaper comic strips (The Phantom by Lee Falk, Miss Fury by Tarpé Mills) as well. Maybe that's why the Green Hornet has fared better in comic books than any of the actual pulp heroes. The 25-minute Hornet radio adventures, entertaining as they were, just aren't as compelling or as memorable as the kind of longer stories told in the pulp magazines, or longer sequential continuities told in the continuing newspaper strips.

              My favorite pulp character in comics is the one that's being done best right now, although there can certainly be several being done right at any one time. In terms of overall consistency of quality, I'd have to go with Lobster Johnson.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                For the characters that actually HAD pulp magazine stories, the comic book stories have rarely (if ever) matched the greatness of the characters as they appeared in their prose fiction stories, as written by the writers who defined those characters (Walter Gibson, Lester Dent, Paul Ernst, Norvell Page, Johnston McCulley). That goes for the newspaper comic strips (The Phantom by Lee Falk, Miss Fury by Tarpé Mills) as well. Maybe that's why the Green Hornet has fared better in comic books than any of the actual pulp heroes. The 25-minute Hornet radio adventures, entertaining as they were, just aren't as compelling or as memorable as the kind of longer stories told in the pulp magazines, or longer sequential continuities told in the continuing newspaper strips.

                My favorite pulp character in comics is the one that's being done best right now, although there can certainly be several being done right at any one time. In terms of overall consistency of quality, I'd have to go with Lobster Johnson.
                I agree with Pulphero that Green Hornet has fared better in comic book form than his original radio version. And I agree that many of the actual pulp heroes were actually better in their original pulp formats than their comic book adaptions/original tributes/etc. For example, DE did a great version of the Spider but no comic book version of the Spider (even a couple of Moonstone's comics or short stories) compares to the breakneck action and thrills a second stories of Norvell Page novels in the pulps of the Spider.

                Having said that, DE has created some great versions of these characters! Green Hornet, the Spider, the Lone Ranger, the Shadow, and the like have had great adaptions under DE's watch.

                Again here is my list of fantastic fiction heroes (I put in bold the ones covered by DE):

                Favorite Pulp heroes:
                Doc Savage
                The Spider
                John Carter, Warlord of Mars (and other ERB characters like Tarzan)
                G-8 & his Battle Aces (Cross between Buffy the Vampire Slayer and James Bond)
                Conan the Barbarian (and other REH heroes--DE and Dark Horse are teaming up to give us a Conan/Red Sonja team up soon!)
                Zorro (one of my favorite movie serials was Zorro's Fighting Legion and I loved Don McGregor's graphic story-telling runs on the character)
                Sherlock Holmes

                Favorite comic strip heroes:
                The Phantom
                Flash Gordon
                Prince Valiant
                Dick Tracy (Max Collins run)
                Little Nemo in Slumberland

                Favorite TV heroes:
                Dr. Who (Jon Pertwee/UNIT years--copied format in Stargate:SG1)
                Power Rangers ("in Space" is my favorite of the franchise--true superhero series like comic books)
                Night Stalker
                Six Million Dollar Man/Bionic Woman
                Wild Wild West
                Star Trek (original Kirk/Spock/Bones dynamic)
                Kung Fu
                Peron of Interest (season one had Mr. Reece acting more like The Shadow
                Land of the Lost
                Law and Order: Criminal Intent (a very modern Sherlock Holmes cop show)
                CSI (original version that made science cool in solving crimes like Doc Savage would do back in the days)
                Battlestar Galatica (loved Starbuck in original series)

                Favorite movie (although James Bond is not originally a movie character, I like his movies too) heroes:
                Billy Jack
                Walking Tall (original movies)
                Jason and the Argonauts
                Star Wars (original movies and versions--Han Solo shot first)
                Jackie Chan (yes, I know he is an actor but he portrays basically the same character with different names--Who am I? is my favorite)
                Indiana Jones

                Favorite manga/anime heroes:
                Case Closed/Detective Conan
                Lone Wolf & Cub
                Starblazers
                Speed Racer
                Astro Boy (2003 version was beautiful to watch)

                Favorite cartoon heroes (I grieve the end of Saturday Morning cartoons by the major networks this year in favor of education shows, an end to an era):
                Johnny Quest
                Filmation heroes (Blackstar, Bravestar, Space Sentinels, Super Seven (Freedom Force, Superstretch/Microwoman, Web Woman, and Manta/Moray--Filmation did a great Tarzan, Flash Gordon, Zorro, Star Trek, etc)
                Space Ghost (original version not the humorous talk show host)
                Herculoids
                Thundarr the Barbarian

                Favorite book series heroes:
                Dirk Pitt (and other Clive Cussler characters--usually a cross between James Bond and Indiana Jones stories)
                The Destroyer
                Lord of the Rings/Hobbit
                The Executioner
                Song of Fire and Ice (although mostly a non-heroic fantasy series)

                Favorite Comic book heroes (created for the comic books--*means series/runs ended):
                Captain Marvel/Shazam (including family characters and Spy Smasher and Bulletman--Cap's and Spy Smasher movie serials were among my favorites)
                Batman (and Robin)
                Iron Man (and War Machine--mature super hero characters)
                Judge Dredd/2000 AD characters (especially Judge Anderson, Rogue Trooper, and Slaine)
                Punisher (a mature vigilante character)
                Black Widow (a mature spy character)
                Thun'da (Great DE series! I am a big Frazetta fan)*
                Superman (editor Mike Carlin run before death of Superman)*
                The Question (both Ditko and O'Neil versions)*
                John Ostrander's DC work (Firestorm, Suicide Squad, Spectre, Manhunter, and Manhunter from Mars--topical/political with continuity enhanced)*
                Captain Atom (Cary Bates and Greg Weisman's run of a government super hero)*
                Fantastic Four (Lee/Kirby and Byrne runs--basically a cosmic version of Doc Savage and his crew)*
                Amazing Spiderman (Ditko run)*
                Dr. Strange (Ditko run and some of Roy Thomas's run)*
                Master of Kung Fu (although based on a pulp villain--particularly the Doug Moench run)*
                Killraven: Warrior of Worlds (Don McGregor's graphic story-telling classic)*
                Black Panther (Don McGregor's graphic story-telling classic stories)*
                Silver Surfer (Buscema's run of graphic novels each issue)*
                All-Star Squadron (Roy Thomas' love of golden age characters particularly the JSA was great)*
                Daredevil by Frank Miller*
                Thor (by Kirby--great combination of Shazam and Conan the Barbarian when Don Blake was Thor's secret ID)*
                Jonah Hex*
                Warlord*
                Sgt. Rock*
                Arak Son of Thunder*
                The Rook (who teamed sometimes with Vampirella had a great supporting cast and was a cross between Dr. Who and Doc Savage)*
                Swamp Thing (original stories by creators and some of Alan Moore's run)*
                Night Force (original series with human pawns of Baron Winters against the supernatural)*
                Superboy and the Legion of Superheroes (by Cockrum and Grell)*
                The Spirit (by Will Eisner, master of graphic story-telling--complete story in 8 pages--not sure if this would qualify as a comic or comic strip)
                Turok: Dinosaur Hunter (Could DE reprint in a trade paperback the great Tim Truman stories from Valiant?)
                The Occult Files of Dr. Specktor (Could DE reprint in a cheaper paperback format these great Gold Key stories? Same with Turok and Magnus: Robot Fighter?)
                Last edited by Blinky McQuade; 11-15-2014, 02:26 PM.

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                • #23
                  re: "G-8 & his Battle Aces (Cross between Buffy the Vampire Slayer and James Bond)" --

                  I remember reading DC's WEIRD WAR TALES in the 1970s and immediately loving it, although at that time I was neither a huge fan of horror comics or war comics, as a genre. At the time it struck me that DC had invented something completely new... little did I know at the time that G-8 and His Battle Aces had invented the "weird war" cross-genre some 4 decades earlier! And had Lt. Steve Savage, the Balloon Buster possessed the unique talents of The Unknown Soldier, and fought Richtmeister Hans von Hammer, the Enemy Ace, in the killer skies during the Great War with the accompaniment of giant radio-controlled vampire bats and a squadron of German werewolf pilots, it would have been something like that.
                  Last edited by pulphero; 11-15-2014, 03:19 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                    re: "G-8 & his Battle Aces (Cross between Buffy the Vampire Slayer and James Bond)" --

                    I remember reading DC's WEIRD WAR TALES in the 1970s and immediately loving it, although at that time I was neither a huge fan of horror comics or war comics, as a genre. At the time it struck me that DC had invented something completely new... little did I know at the time that G-8 and His Battle Aces had invented the "weird war" cross-genre some 4 decades earlier! And had Lt. Steve Savage, the Balloon Buster possessed the unique talents of The Unknown Soldier, and fought Richtmeister Hans von Hammer, the Enemy Ace, in the killer skies during the Great War with the accompaniment of giant radio-controlled vampire bats and a squadron of German werewolf pilots, it would have been something like that.

                    I loved those weird war characters too! It also took me a while to discover G-8 & His Battle Ace! DC also gave us a great Haunted Tank stories, Viking Commando, and Creature Commandos!

                    I had trouble posting earlier and had to do multiple attempts. Below is my favorite Radio heroes that somehow missed in the postings:

                    Favorite Radio heroes (thanks to Sirus XM Radio Classics, it is a joy to listen to these great show): Bold for those characters covered by DE
                    The Shadow

                    The Green Hornet
                    The Lone Ranger
                    Gunsmoke

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Blinky McQuade View Post
                      I loved those weird war characters too! It also took me a while to discover G-8 & His Battle Ace! DC also gave us a great Haunted Tank stories, Viking Commando, and Creature Commandos!
                      Don't forget Kanigher's weirdest, wackiest war series of them all -- "The War That Time Forgot" in STAR-SPANGLED WAR STORIES. It might seem clearly "inspired" by Edgar Rice Burroughs' novel The Land That Time Forgot (and its sequels), but I always had a sneaking suspicion that Kanigher needed to look no further for inspiration than a typical boy's toy box in the early 1960s... filled with those ubiquitous little green plastic army men and equally common multicolored plastic dinosaurs. Any sandbox in any kid's backyard could have been "Dinosaur Island". Kanigher made several attempts to establish some ongoing characters in the series (it's where the original Suicide Squad and G. I. Robot got their start), but none seemed to last beyond a few stories. A high point in the series was reached just prior to the end with a wonderful 2-part story drawn by the legendary Russ Heath featuring a new character called "the Birdman", who was sort of like Frank Frazetta's THUN'DA... but shared the same relation with the pterodactyls on Dinosaur Island that Ka-Zar shared with Zabu. Still think it would make a great movie. I know the SyFy Channel already did something like that, but lousy execution doesn't mean the IDEA was lousy.

                      The weird war continues even today, in the occasional series of miniseries from Image Comics, '68, only now it's the Vietnam War, with zombies.
                      Last edited by pulphero; 11-15-2014, 06:15 PM.

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                      • #26
                        My favorite is Tarzan, the greatest pulp hero ever.

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                        • #27
                          I'm a Tarzan fan too, but my favourite has to be The Shadow. There's just something about him.

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                          • #28
                            Favorite Pulp Hero: The Spider - The Dynamite series was outstanding and they need to bring him back in his own series again soon.

                            Favorite Modern Pulp Hero: The Rocketeer - Love the Rocketeer and his stories. The new IDW comics have been wonderful as well.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by IrishX View Post
                              Favorite Pulp Hero: The Spider - The Dynamite series was outstanding and they need to bring him back in his own series again soon.

                              Favorite Modern Pulp Hero: The Rocketeer - Love the Rocketeer and his stories. The new IDW comics have been wonderful as well.
                              Um, I think when most of us are talking "modern pulp hero" we mean a pulp (or pulp-style) hero set in modern times, not one created in modern times that has his story set in the '30s/'40s. Like DE's Spider was set in modern times, or the Kevin Smith Green Hornet.

                              You gotta give cred to the Rocketeer for being 'way ahead of the curve for the current revival of pulp and pulp-style characters, though. That was the early 1980s.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                                Um, I think when most of us are talking "modern pulp hero" we mean a pulp (or pulp-style) hero set in modern times, not one created in modern times that has his story set in the '30s/'40s. Like DE's Spider was set in modern times, or the Kevin Smith Green Hornet.

                                You gotta give cred to the Rocketeer for being 'way ahead of the curve for the current revival of pulp and pulp-style characters, though. That was the early 1980s.
                                In that case Batman would be the greatest modern day pulp hero.

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