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Dynamite acquires The Spirit

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  • Dynamite acquires The Spirit

    Cool. I hope they get someone good to write it. http://http://www.comicbookresources...ticle&id=54226

  • #2
    Link don't work.

    Originally posted by Lobster Johnson View Post
    Cool. I hope they get someone good to write it. http://http://www.comicbookresources...ticle&id=54226

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ralphuniverse View Post
      Link don't work.
      Whoops. This one should:http://www.comicbookresources.com/?p...ticle&id=54226

      Comment


      • #4
        "We're hoping to see Dynamite's new comics of The Spirit surpass the circulation of the Will Eisner's original series," said the Eisner's estate Nancy and Carl Gropper in a joint statement.
        OK, I will grant you that THE SPIRIT was never in a lot of newspapers, like more famous strips such as Flash Gordon, Dick Tracy, or Terry and the Pirates. But even so, we're talking about the newspaper readership of (at its height) a couple of dozen newspapers, and a few of them were pretty big newspapers.

        Do Nancy and Carl Gropper have any clue about the circulation figures of independent comics publishers? Because that statement just sounds either completely ignorant or completely naive on the face of it.

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        • #5
          VERY Excited!

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          • #6
            Hopefully Darwyn Cooke can write and draw this again. His previous stuff with this character for DC was pretty good.
            I wonder if this will be set in the modern day or the 40's.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Lobster Johnson View Post
              Hopefully Darwyn Cooke can write and draw this again. His previous stuff with this character for DC was pretty good.
              I wonder if this will be set in the modern day or the 40's.
              I would have to judge the likelihood of Dynamite getting Darwyn Cooke to do interior art on a Spirit series to be not very good (don't get me wrong, I'd be deliriously happy if they did). Don't forget Cooke only drew a dozen Spirit stories, and DC's first Spirit series ran 32 issues. At the present time, he seems pretty involved in adapting Richard Stark's "Parker" crime novels for IDW. They are, in chronological order: The Hunter, The Outfit, The Score, and Slayground. Rarely have I found a series of page-turners so compelling in their "can't-put-it-down" quality. Set in the early 1960s, Parker is kind of an independent operator, a guy who puts together jobs, using his associates and contacts (you know, "I know a guy who knows a guy") to pull some big heist. The detail with which it goes down, and the consequences of plans gone awry, are absolutely fascinating. And of course, at one point he runs afoul of The Syndicate (a.k.a. "The Outfit"). I'm not generally a huge fan of crime fiction, but these books are superb, so check them out if you haven't already. For some reason, they don't inspire me with the desire to read the original novels, but man, as long as Cooke continues to produce these adaptations, I'll be there to pick them up.

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              As far as previous creators on DC's Spirit go, it seems much more likely to me that they could get the team of David Hine and Moritat (from DC's First Wave version of the character). Neither one seems to be excessively busy at the moment, and Moritat would seem to have time in his schedule after recently giving up All Star Western. I'd be happy with that.

              Then again, maybe DE could go the same route as Kitchen Sink's The Spirit: The New Adventures from the 1990s, and make it a book with a different creative team on every story. That would seem to make the potential odds of getting some really good creators a lot greater.

              It seems probable to me that Denis Kitchen is involved in this project in some way, as some sort of executive producer (if not the actual editor). Last I recall, he was still the representative of the Eisner estate. That The Spirit is as well-known as he is among comics readers today has got to be credited to Kitchen's efforts to keep the character in print in some form. With Will Eisner's approval, he appointed himself to the position of The Spirit's "caretaker" back in the 1970s, and has guided the character's destiny ever since. That makes me hopeful that DE's new series will meet with the fans' approval.
              Last edited by pulphero; 08-04-2014, 07:41 AM.

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              • #8
                I do believe that Richard Stark is a pen name for Donald E. Westlake who wrote mostly funny tongue in cheek crime stuff so he created the Stark name for his more serious stuff.
                Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
                Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
                http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                  I would have to judge the likelihood of Dynamite getting Darwyn Cooke to do interior art on a Spirit series to be not very good (don't get me wrong, I'd be deliriously happy if they did). Don't forget Cooke only drew a dozen Spirit stories, and DC's first Spirit series ran 32 issues.
                  Did Cooke write a dozen issues, but only illustrate some of them?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lobster Johnson View Post
                    Did Cooke write a dozen issues, but only illustrate some of them?
                    To be a little more specific, Darwyn Cooke both wrote and pencilled The Spirit #1-6 and 8-12 (he skipped issue #7, which had several stories written and drawn by different people). But he also wrote (I think Jeph Loeb actually dialogued the story) and drew the Batman and The Spirit crossover one-shot that preceded the regular series, so that makes it an even dozen.

                    The Spirit #13 through 32 were written and drawn by... a whole bunch of people. Well, saying it that way makes it sound bad, but it wasn't, really.
                    Last edited by pulphero; 08-04-2014, 08:02 PM.

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                    • #11
                      I always was amazed how Will Eisner was able to tell a complete story in a mere 8 pages! Keep in mind he created a hero to be part of a weekly newspaper insert (like the the Parade Magazine in my Sunday's paper--but with superheroes! Lady Luck and Mr. Mystic balance out the Spirit Section). I am not old enough to have read any of the actual sections but read all the Kitchen Sink series and became a Spirit fan. Moreover, the craftsmanship of Eisner's artistic ability to use the entire page to graphically tell a story was amazing!

                      The problem I had with DC Comics renditions of the Spirit was to expand to a full 24-ish pages of a modern comic and some stories were multiple issues as opposed to the classic 8 page complete stories. There were a few good gems among DC's run however. I thought the Kitchen Sink original stories in 1996-1997 Spirit tribute run was better--an anthology of multiple Spirit stories using a rotating creative teams telling their Spirit stories. According to Wikepidia, that series featured Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons, Neil Gaiman, Joe Lansdale, and Paul Chadwick. Perhaps DE might want to think about an anthology of some kind with a Spirit story in each issue (maybe a Masks anthology with a Spirit story as one of the stories each month?).

                      Will Eisner created the Spirit after supposedly all the other superheroes were all ready created. His hero was a normal guy in a mask that had the advantage of everyone thinking he was dead. I hated the movie version which gave him wolverine powers. Besides, the Spirit would have worked better as a half-hour tv series than a movie (episodic adventures as opposed to an epic movie treatment, the same problem I have with the current Star Trek movies--bring back the Star Trek tv show of episodic exploration of science fiction/twilight zone stories with a regular cast than the shoot-them-up epic stories that do not get a chance to explore sci-fi concepts).

                      Good luck DE--the Spirit is a good character!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Blinky McQuade View Post
                        I always was amazed how Will Eisner was able to tell a complete story in a mere 8 pages! Keep in mind he created a hero to be part of a weekly newspaper insert (like the the Parade Magazine in my Sunday's paper--but with superheroes! Lady Luck and Mr. Mystic balance out the Spirit Section). I am not old enough to have read any of the actual sections but read all the Kitchen Sink series and became a Spirit fan. Moreover, the craftsmanship of Eisner's artistic ability to use the entire page to graphically tell a story was amazing!

                        The problem I had with DC Comics renditions of the Spirit was to expand to a full 24-ish pages of a modern comic and some stories were multiple issues as opposed to the classic 8 page complete stories. There were a few good gems among DC's run however. I thought the Kitchen Sink original stories in 1996-1997 Spirit tribute run was better--an anthology of multiple Spirit stories using a rotating creative teams telling their Spirit stories. According to Wikepidia, that series featured Alan Moore, Dave Gibbons, Neil Gaiman, Joe Lansdale, and Paul Chadwick. Perhaps DE might want to think about an anthology of some kind with a Spirit story in each issue (maybe a Masks anthology with a Spirit story as one of the stories each month?).

                        Will Eisner created the Spirit after supposedly all the other superheroes were all ready created. His hero was a normal guy in a mask that had the advantage of everyone thinking he was dead. I hated the movie version which gave him wolverine powers. Besides, the Spirit would have worked better as a half-hour tv series than a movie (episodic adventures as opposed to an epic movie treatment, the same problem I have with the current Star Trek movies--bring back the Star Trek tv show of episodic exploration of science fiction/twilight zone stories with a regular cast than the shoot-them-up epic stories that do not get a chance to explore sci-fi concepts).

                        Good luck DE--the Spirit is a good character!
                        I have no problem with 1 issue-long stories, but I agree that huge epic stories aren't right for the Spirit. Hopefully DE will try to have either 1 issue or 8 page stories.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                          OK, I will grant you that THE SPIRIT was never in a lot of newspapers, like more famous strips such as Flash Gordon, Dick Tracy, or Terry and the Pirates. But even so, we're talking about the newspaper readership of (at its height) a couple of dozen newspapers, and a few of them were pretty big newspapers.

                          Do Nancy and Carl Gropper have any clue about the circulation figures of independent comics publishers? Because that statement just sounds either completely ignorant or completely naive on the face of it.
                          There was an actual comic book called The Spirit from Quality Comics that ran from 1944 to 1950 and reprinted the Sunday strips. Perhaps that was what they were referring to.

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                          By the way, has anybody heard anything further from Dynamite as to if / when he'll be showing up?

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                          • #14
                            You're completely missing what I'm saying, Major. The representatives for the Eisner estate are talking as if THE SPIRIT could ever reach the number of readers it did in its initial run, under this new deal with Dynamite. That's either the most outrageous hyperbole, or they haven't a real clue about how many readers DE's comics actually reach. It's the sheerest fantasy to think that The Spirit is ever going to reach that number of readers ever again.

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                            • #15
                              Anyone heard any word yet on when he'll start showing up in a comic book from Dynamite?

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