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  • Justice Inc. : Faces Of Justice

    Interesting to see Gentile's name attached to this, as the founder of Moonstone Books.

    Dynamite Entertainment has announced that Justice, Inc.: The Avenger is set to return in a brand-new six issue miniseries, Faces of Justice, courtesy of co-writers Kyle Higgins (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, Magnus) and Joe Gentile (Zorro, The Green Hornet), and artist Alexandre Shibao (Independence Day).

    When the FBI discovers evidence that incriminates Richard Benson in a brutal murder, the Avenger finds himself arrested and subjected to an intense investigation by the Bureau’s best agents! Now the Justice, Inc. team must spring into action to save their leader, and discover if there’s a sinister plot at play; or could the Avenger actually be guilty of such a heinous crime?

    Writer Kyle Higgins says, “The Avenger is one of those great, classic pulp characters who has both an incredibly rich history as well as a long list of modern superheroes who owe their creative inspiration to him. I love pulp, noir, and superheroes, so when Dynamite asked if I’d have any interest in telling a new Avenger story, it was a pretty easy sell for me. I’ve known Joe Gentile for as long as I’ve been reading comics. In fact, it was his publishing company, Moonstone Books, that first introduced me to how comics are made, and ultimately set me on the path to becoming a writer. Joe and I have wanted to do something together for years, so when Dynamite called and asked if I’d have any interest in telling a story with The Avenger, the first person I thought of was Joe. Justice Inc. and The Avenger are some of his all-time favorite characters, and I could think of no one better to build a bad-ass pulp story with.”

    Writer Joe Gentile says, "The Avenger has always appealed to me because, while his whole reason to fight crime centers on the loss of his wife and daughter, the incident was mainly his fault. Finding peace with that has been such a challenge for him, and really permeates everything he does with Justice Inc. Physically, he isn’t built like Superman. As a matter of fact, he’s fairly-average sized. But when he walks into a room, his energy commands respect and turns heads. Who doesn’t want some of that?

    The Avenger originally debuted in September 1939 as the lead character in an eponymous pulp magazine, published by Street and Smith Publications. Writer Paul Ernst is credited with creating many of the earliest Avenger tales (published under the house writer pseudonym “Kenneth Robeson”), blending the qualities of contemporary pulp heroes like Doc Savage and The Shadow, as well as his own creations that included Seekay, The Wraith, Dick Bullitt, Old Stone Face, the Gray Marauder, and Karlu the Mystic. The Avenger appeared in numerous prose novels, radio programs, and comic books throughout the decades, most recently in Dynamite Entertainment’s 2014 revival of the Justice, Inc. series written by acclaimed author Michael Uslan and illustrated by Giovanni Timpano.

    The debut issue of Justice Inc.: The Avenger – Faces of Justice features cover artwork by Tom Mandrake (Batman, New Mutants) and Alexandre Shibao (Batman/Superman). Justice Inc.: The Avenger – Faces of Justice #1 will be solicited in the May 2017 Previews catalog and slated for release in July.
    Again to bleedingcool for cover images.

    https://www.bleedingcool.com/2017/04...venger-series/

  • #2
    Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
    Interesting to see Gentile's name attached to this, as the founder of Moonstone Books.
    Well, he won't be writing any Avenger comics for Moonstone, although that certainly doesn't prevent him from writing Avenger prose stories. Possibly this series is even adapted by Kyle Higgins from a story Gentile contributed to one of Moonstone's Avenger prose collections

    I guess Dynamite can't take him seriously as a competing comic book publisher, but that doesn't mean they might not like him as a writer.

    As far as comics go, DE and Moonstone are so many levels removed from each other that you can hardly say that anyone's taking money away from anyone else.

    Comment


    • #3
      Okay, there isn't a single thing about it that's interesting then.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
        Okay, there isn't a single thing about it that's interesting then.
        I'm not really clear on where it went from "It's ... interesting" to "there isn't a single thing about it that's interesting" for you, unless the former was merely a side observation having nothing to do with any interest in the story. I suppose I can presume as much as it has something to do with Joe Gentile's involvement, but you never really mentioned whether you just don't like his writing, or dislike his involvement for some other reason. I do get a vague sense that it may hinge on your perception of Dynamite and Moonstone as rival publishers, and that they share (or have, at one time) many of the same property licenses: Zorro, Lone Ranger, Green Hornet, Black Bat, The Phantom, The Spider. Yet the name Moonstone Books tells you where that publisher's bread is buttered (prose fiction), while as comic book publishers, DE and Moonstone are obviously mismatched in terms of size, so it doesn't surprise me that they can both be licensees of Conde Nast for the property The Avenger. I see no real conflict there, because each publisher is focused mainly on a different medium. Writer Joe Gentile can choose to work for publisher Nick Barrucci, or for publisher Joe Gentile, who both happen to share the same property license, The Avenger (but for different media). I don't see any necessary conflict of interest for writer Joe Gentile. Obviously any licensor would prefer to opt in favor of the larger publisher in any given medium, in order to get their property exposed to as many consumers as possible, and many of them don't want to grant exclusive licenses encompassing multiple media (or multiple properties) to only one publisher. We've seen as much with ERB, Inc.'s licensing policies, which include Dynamite, Dark Horse, IDW, and Titan Books when it comes to comics, and Altus Press when it comes to prose fiction.

        I'll give it a look before dismissing any potential out-of-hand. Whether or not anyone opts for a trial reading of any comic is based on their own predispositions toward it, considering both the character(s) and creators. The potential negatives weighing against this one aren't definite in my mind as yet.
        Last edited by positronic; 04-23-2017, 12:05 AM.
        DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by positronic View Post
          I'm not really clear on where it went from "It's ... interesting" to "there isn't a single thing about it that's interesting" for you,
          I was being sarcastic because I felt that was basically the response that I got to my original statement.

          I DO find it interesting that he would write comics for Dynamite. Gentile has been in this game for a fair amount of time, working on many of the same characters that Dynamite has been publishing for over a decade. And yet this is the first time that he works for Dynamite, that I can think of. Or if he has, it's probably not a hell of a lot.

          It's actually a very good match but because Dynamite's been around for about 12 years now, and Gentile had to yet to have any involvement with them despite the overlap in publishing interest, I didn't really expect it to ever happen anymore regardless of each company's size or favoured format.

          I'd feel the same if Ron Fortier wrote for Dynamite. He's been doing it for ages, but not for Dynamite. If he did join Dynamite, I wouldn't just dismiss as just another writer getting work with the largest publisher he can.
          Last edited by Captain Canuck; 04-23-2017, 10:11 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
            I was being sarcastic because I felt that was basically the response that I got to my original statement.

            I DO find it interesting that he would write comics for Dynamite. Gentile has been in this game for a fair amount of time, working on many of the same characters that Dynamite has been publishing for over a decade. And yet this is the first time that he works for Dynamite, that I can think of. Or if he has, it's probably not a hell of a lot.

            It's actually a very good match but because Dynamite's been around for about 12 years now, and Gentile had to yet to have any involvement with them despite the overlap in publishing interest, I didn't really expect it to ever happen anymore regardless of each company's size or favoured format.

            I'd feel the same if Ron Fortier wrote for Dynamite. He's been doing it for ages, but not for Dynamite. If he did join Dynamite, I wouldn't just dismiss as just another writer getting work with the largest publisher he can.
            Interesting that you should mention Ron Fortier in connection to this topic, since Ron - as the publisher of Airship 27's new pulp fiction prose books, and even comic books (in partnership with Rosebud Studios), shares that very same relationship with Joe Gentile (as publisher of Moonstone Books) as Joe does with Dynamite in this particular instance. As a writer, Ron Fortier has contributed to some of Moonstone's prose fiction anthologies, featuring some of the very same characters that Ron Fortier the publisher has used in his anthologies for Airship 27 (like the Black Bat, or Domino Lady).

            What's perhaps a little more notable about that parallel is that Moonstone and Airship 27 are both publishers of new pulp prose anthologies, as well as a small line of comic books, and one might fairly say that both publishers are more or less on an equitable level by comparison to each other in scale. The main distinction between them would be that Moonstone is making the better part of its profit off of licensed properties, while Airship 27 mainly confines its anthologies and comics to public domain characters and original characters in the vein of pulp heroes.

            I guess it just goes to show that when it comes to new pulp fiction, whether the characters are copyrighted or public domain, and whether the medium is prose or comics, it really is a very small world, dominated by just a few well-known names associated with the genre. As for Ron Fortier ever writing for publisher Nick Barrucci's comics featuring licensed pulp characters? Well, never say never, I guess. We just have to keep in mind things like the size of the publisher and the medium, which goes a long way towards explaining why Dynamite often updates its licensed pulp characters, in light of trying to market them to the larger audience dominating the comic book marketplace. Moonstone Books and Airship 27 share a lot of the same customer base of dedicated, pre-sold consumers of pulp heroes. Currently, it seems like Dynamite may have given up on that idea of appealing to those non-presold consumers who dominate the comic book marketplace, as the more recent iterations of comic book series based on licensed pulp properties published by DE are leaning towards more authentic period adaptations, as opposed to updated takes.
            Last edited by positronic; 04-24-2017, 01:35 AM.
            DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by positronic View Post
              Interesting that you should mention Ron Fortier in connection to this topic, since Ron - as the publisher of Airship 27's new pulp fiction prose books, and even comic books (in partnership with Rosebud Studios), shares that very same relationship with Joe Gentile (as publisher of Moonstone Books) as Joe does with Dynamite in this particular instance. As a writer, Ron Fortier has contributed to some of Moonstone's prose fiction anthologies, featuring some of the very same characters that Ron Fortier the publisher has used in his anthologies for Airship 27 (like the Black Bat, or Domino Lady).
              Precisely why I brought him up. Now in his case Fortier had an established relationship with Moonstone from well before he began Airship 27, I believe. So that he would contribute stories to them while publishing his own isn't really surprising. Maybe he has a good Moon Man story ready to go but knows the won't be publishing a Moon Man book in the foreseeable future so why not direct it to Moonstone? I would be far more surprised if he released Brother Bones material through Moonstone, of course.

              I don't know of any past relationship between Gentile of Dynamite. Maybe there is one, but not knowing about it, I found it to be surprising union.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm not 100% on this, but I think Moonstone Books might actually pre-date Dynamite Entertainment as a publisher (not sure about Dynamic Forces...). Nick obviously likes the pulp hero characters, so who knows? Just because they've never had a business relationship prior to this, doesn't mean Nick B. and Joe G. didn't know each other years ago.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                  I'm not 100% on this, but I think Moonstone Books might actually pre-date Dynamite Entertainment as a publisher (not sure about Dynamic Forces...). Nick obviously likes the pulp hero characters, so who knows? Just because they've never had a business relationship prior to this, doesn't mean Nick B. and Joe G. didn't know each other years ago.
                  According to Wikipedia, Moonstone was founded in 1995.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
                    According to Wikipedia, Moonstone was founded in 1995.
                    A good decade or so before Dynamite began publishing its own comics, the first titles of which I think were Red Sonja and Battlestar Galactica, circa 2005-2006. I'll have to do some checking to see what Moonstone's first published prose fiction and comics were.
                    DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by positronic View Post
                      A good decade or so before Dynamite began publishing its own comics, the first titles of which I think were Red Sonja and Battlestar Galactica, circa 2005-2006. I'll have to do some checking to see what Moonstone's first published prose fiction and comics were.
                      I tried to find out that out quickly for kicks. I believed it would have been written by Gentile but that doesn't appear to be the case.

                      they still have some Vampire: The Masquerade material on their website. That feels a little dated so maybe it was those types of books. Or Gentile first wrote Sherlock Holmes comics. One of the ones he wrote for Northstar (Soul Of The Dragon) was also published by Moonstone and the promotional text includes that it's from 1995, so that's probably it.

                      Years after the fact, Holmes and Watson retrieve their tin dispatch box from Cox & Co. Inside they find three new Victorian adventures. 1995, 80pgs, b/w

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
                        I tried to find out that out quickly for kicks. I believed it would have been written by Gentile but that doesn't appear to be the case.

                        they still have some Vampire: The Masquerade material on their website. That feels a little dated so maybe it was those types of books. Or Gentile first wrote Sherlock Holmes comics. One of the ones he wrote for Northstar (Soul Of The Dragon) was also published by Moonstone and the promotional text includes that it's from 1995, so that's probably it.
                        Some early titles I was able to find listed on GCD, ComicbookDB.com, and MyComicShop.com:

                        Mr. Nightmare's Winter Special 1995 1 issue
                        Mr. Nightmare's Wonderful World 1995-97 7 issues
                        Arianne 1996 1 issue
                        Dark Cloud: The Game 1996 1 issue
                        Romancer 1996 1 issue
                        Evilman Saves the World 1996 1 issue
                        Evilman: Tentacles, toasters, & Terror 1997 1 issue
                        Cambion 1997 3 issues
                        Sherlock Holmes Mysteries 1997 1 issue

                        ... and that was it for comics for the 1990s. I thought for sure I'd see something more recognizable like Buckaroo Banzai or Kolchak the Night Stalker, but no -- and just the one issue of Sherlock Holmes Mysteries. I was assuming the prose fiction anthologies began in the 1990s as well, but now I'm not too sure about that (I don't know where I could actually check that). I'm not entirely sure about this, but I think the first Moonstone prose fiction book may have been a Kolchak novel or anthology, circa 2002-2003.

                        At any rate, Moonstone started out fairly tiny, and their earliest titles weren't characterized in general as 'new pulp', or retro or nostalgia-related titles.

                        For further browsing, if you're interested - Complete listings of titles:
                        https://www.comics.org/publisher/1027/
                        http://comicbookdb.com/publisher.php?ID=19
                        http://www.mycomicshop.com/search?PubID=17021
                        Last edited by positronic; 04-30-2017, 05:14 AM.
                        DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Solicitation for #2:

                          JUSTICE INC.: THE AVENGER – FACES OF JUSTICE #2 (of 4)
                          Cover A: Tom Mandrake Writer: Kyle Higgins, Joe Gentile Art: Alexandre Shibao

                          The mystery only deepens! Who really could have killed the scientist Doctor Sprechen? It’s not looking good for the man who calls himself the Avenger! In the aftermath of a clash with some suspicious thugs, Team Avenger races the clock to follow up on a clue that might help exonerate their leader – and Benson finds himself contending with serious opponents in the diligent men and women of the nation’s Federal Bureau of Investigation!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Has anybody actually read this series?

                            I looked through the first issue in the store but passed on it.
                            What I saw didn't really convince me it was worth my money.
                            (Which is a shame, because I use to enjoy the paperback stories that were available back in the 1970s.)

                            Has anybody been reading this latest series? How has it been?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I liked the first issue, probably better than the previous JUSTICE INC. miniseries. A little too soon to say where it's going, but someone's trying to frame The Avenger for murder.
                              DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

                              Comment

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