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Green Hornet ’66 Meets Will Eisner’s The Spirit

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  • Green Hornet ’66 Meets Will Eisner’s The Spirit

    Dynamite is all kinds of busy today!

    The TV version of the Green Hornet from 1966 is making a new friend. The characters played in the classic television series by Van Johnson and Bruce Lee will be another masked hero in Will Eisner’s The Spirit. The Green Hornet ’66 Meets the Spirit is being written by Fred Van Lente (Archer & Armstrong, Cowboys and Aliens), with art by Bob Q (Kings Quest).

    The Green Hornet is back and on the case! With his aide Kato and their rolling arsenal, The Black Beauty, by his side, The Green Hornet is ready to face the toughest of challenges! On police records a wanted criminal, The Green Hornet is secretly Britt Reid, owner/publisher of The Daily Sentinel. Reid and Kato have traveled to Central City to participate in the futuristic World’s Fair, and to get the skinny on the new and potentially dangerous “Newspaper of Tomorrow”, a device capable of predicting headlines before events happen.

    Writer Fred Van Lente says,
    "I’m very excited to link these two iconic characters. The Spirit has been a favorite of mine since I was a kid, and the opportunity to pair Will Eisner’s legendary creation with a character that has an actual year in its name allowed me to age The Spirit cast fourteen years forward. In our world, the Spirit hasn’t been seen since 1952 (the year the strip ended) but suddenly this new guy has appeared in the mask and hat — one who will look pretty familiar to longtime fans. Who is this guy, and why has he returned? This is the mystery Green Hornet and Kato must solve."

    The debut issue of The Green Hornet ’66 Meets the Spirit features cover artwork by Mike and Laura Allred (Batman ’66, X-Force, iZombie), Ty Templeton (Batman 66, The Simpsons) and Javier Pulido (The Amazing Spiderman, Robin: Year One), respectively. The Green Hornet ’66 Meets the Spirit #1 will be solicited in the May 2017 Previews catalog and slated for release in July.

  • #2
    Writer Fred Van Lente says,
    "I’m very excited to link these two iconic characters. The Spirit has been a favorite of mine since I was a kid, and the opportunity to pair Will Eisner’s legendary creation with a character that has an actual year in its name allowed me to age The Spirit cast fourteen years forward. In our world, the Spirit hasn’t been seen since 1952 (the year the strip ended).
    Ah, but what writer Fred Van Lente says is actually not true. The Spirit HAS been seen in our world since the strip ended in 1952, and in fact he DID have new adventures in 1966. There were FIVE such stories written and drawn by Will Eisner, all of which appeared within about a year, beginning in January 1966. They have all been reprinted in the final volume (26) of DC's The Spirit Archives.
    In OUR world. I don't know about Fred Van Lente's world.

    If he's talking about in the fictional story he's writing set in 1966, maybe he should have said "in our comic book" or "in our story". In fact, what did the artist have to do with that decision? Shouldn't Van Lente be telling us about what's happening in HIS story? What a confused fellow. Likes to refer to himself in the collective sense of the possessive pronoun?
    Last edited by pulphero; 04-17-2017, 03:43 PM.

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    • #3
      Wonder if the first issue of this series will get published before issue #3 of Francavilla's WILL EISNER’S THE SPIRIT: THE CORPSE-MAKERS run?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
        Wonder if the first issue of this series will get published before issue #3 of Francavilla's WILL EISNER’S THE SPIRIT: THE CORPSE-MAKERS run?
        Francavilla is a dedicated creator, but he's not one who turns out pages rapidly. He's always got several irons in the fire, working on alternate covers, commissions, doing the convention circuit, etc. He recently finished contributing a 5-part Black Beetle story to DARK HORSE PRESENTS (soon to be solicited as a one-shot reprint... I hope). A better question to ask might be which will come out first, the next Francavilla SPIRIT, or the next AFTERLIFE WITH ARCHIE. Granted, that may not be something that matters to you, but they're both assignments that Francavilla is committed to, so for him it's a question of how much time does he dedicate to finishing each one, and which is the priority.
        DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by positronic View Post
          Francavilla is a dedicated creator, but he's not one who turns out pages rapidly. He's always got several irons in the fire, working on alternate covers, commissions, doing the convention circuit, etc. He recently finished contributing a 5-part Black Beetle story to DARK HORSE PRESENTS (soon to be solicited as a one-shot reprint... I hope). A better question to ask might be which will come out first, the next Francavilla SPIRIT, or the next AFTERLIFE WITH ARCHIE. Granted, that may not be something that matters to you, but they're both assignments that Francavilla is committed to, so for him it's a question of how much time does he dedicate to finishing each one, and which is the priority.
          How late is Afterlife With Archie?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
            How late is Afterlife With Archie?
            Hard to say exactly. Archie Comics Publications has a fairly routine practice of soliciting a title, cancelling the solicitation months later, and resoliciting it again yet more months later. Unless someone just can't live without it, I'd imagine almost everyone's given up trying to keep track by now, and just waits to see the list of titles Diamond Comics is officially distributing this week.

            And that is the true horror of the Archie Horror imprint. I can't remember whether they actually got two, or only one, issue out in 2016.

            Comment


            • #7
              Solicitation for #2:

              THE GREEN HORNET ’66 MEETS THE SPIRIT #2 (of 5)
              Cover A: Ty Templeton Writer: Fred Van Lente Art: Bob Q

              No time for GREEN HORNET & KATO and THE SPIRIT to tussle…there’s an army of gangster thugs loyal to KID KRAKEN (who?) determined to stop our heroes from escaping Central City’s World Expo! Can our bickering be-hatted heroes combine forces and survive the most violent of nights?

              Comment


              • #8
                re: issue #2

                Despite some concerns I had with having Fred Van Lente writing this, I'm actually enjoying this crossover so far.
                (I do wonder if the man in the shadows at the end of issue #2 is really who Van Lente seems to want us to believe it is.)

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm still wondering how Britt Reid's fake computer was able to predict actual future events accurately.
                  DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
                    Despite some concerns I had with having Fred Van Lente writing this, I'm actually enjoying this crossover so far.
                    (I do wonder if the man in the shadows at the end of issue #2 is really who Van Lente seems to want us to believe it is.)
                    That would beg the question of why Ebony White would be working for The Octopus... or IS it the Octopus?? Maybe Ebony's boss hasn't changed so much as the boss's gloves have changed... which leads to the question of why Denny Colt would disappear only to take over the identity of The Octopus... but The Octopus is believed dead, so that doesn't seem right either... and it seems like we're a long way away from the original Spirit actually meeting the Green Hornet.

                    Somehow I felt I enjoyed this issue less than the previous one, though. Second issue into a 5-issue miniseries and the co-star still hasn't made an overt appearance as himself.
                    Last edited by positronic; 08-10-2017, 04:05 AM.
                    DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by positronic View Post
                      That would beg the question of why Ebony White would be working for The Octopus... or IS it the Octopus?? Maybe Ebony's boss hasn't changed so much as the boss's gloves have changed... which leads to the question of why Denny Colt would disappear only to take over the identity of The Octopus... but The Octopus is believed dead, so that doesn't seem right either... and it seems like we're a long way away from the original Spirit actually meeting the Green Hornet.

                      Somehow I felt I enjoyed this issue less than the previous one, though. Second issue into a 5-issue miniseries and the co-star still hasn't made an overt appearance as himself.
                      Well, we did see The Spirit in a couple of panels set in 1952, and then there was the explosion. A possibility is that the Spirit survived the explosion, but when he recovered he thought he was really the Octopus, so that could be why it looks like Ebony is dealing with the Octopus in the present-day. (It might also explain why "The Octopus" is hanging out in The Spirit's underground headquarters in Wildwood Cemetary.) Or, there are many other variations, like Ebony wound up saving the Octopus back in the 1950s thinking it was the Spirit, or Ebony is "serving" the Octopus in an effort to learn what happened to The Spirit.
                      By the way, the "Central City Expo" in 1966 is really throwing me for a loop sometimes. I went to the New York City World's Fair as a really young kid a few times back in 1964-65 and still remember a few things from then. The take on the Unisphere on the main cover for issue #1 screamed "New York City" a little too loudly, and this issue we get the "We Have Just One World After All" boat ride (a take on the "It's a Small World" ride that Disney had at the New York World's Fair).

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
                        By the way, the "Central City Expo" in 1966 is really throwing me for a loop sometimes. I went to the New York City World's Fair as a really young kid a few times back in 1964-65 and still remember a few things from then. The take on the Unisphere on the main cover for issue #1 screamed "New York City" a little too loudly, and this issue we get the "We Have Just One World After All" boat ride (a take on the "It's a Small World" ride that Disney had at the New York World's Fair).
                        It's one of those comics tropes that work just fine in the context of a self-contained universe, where the hero's hometown (a major metropolitan city) is a fictionalized analog for New York City (mostly). That worked well for Central City in THE SPIRIT, and for Gotham City in BATMAN -- "back in the day".

                        Since the rise of the "superhero universe" concept in the 1960s, made popular by Marvel Comics (who for the most part, quickly dispensed with the 'fictional city' concept after a few early FFs and the Johnny Storm strip in STRANGE TALES, opting instead to identify the hometown of most of its fictional heroes as New York City itself), it's been an un-easy coexistence between fictitious analogs like Gotham City & Metropolis, and the real-world city they're both loosely based on -- New York City. It's something clearly less problematical in the Marvel Universe than it is in the DC Universe, but now with inter-company crossover stories being common, it sometimes requires a fictional city like Central City to (quite suddenly) co-exist with real ones like Chicago or Detroit or New York City. In modern day-set Green Hornet stories, his hometown has sometimes been given as Century City or Sentinel City, but 'classic' Green Hornet stories, IIRC, mostly seem to stick with Chicago.

                        I tell you, it's going to be a real problem if there's ever an inter-company crossover with The Flash and The Spirit. I guess the obvious way around that would be to say that there are two different Central Citys located in two completely different states, but even that seems tenuous because there ARE no two "major metropolitan" cities in the United States bearing the same name. Since Flash can easily bridge dimensional barriers between parallel universes by adjusting his own internal vibrational frequency, that would be the easier route to go for him in a inter-company crossover... but not so easy for the Green Hornet and The Spirit.
                        DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by positronic View Post
                          . . . I tell you, it's going to be a real problem if there's ever an inter-company crossover with The Flash and The Spirit. I guess the obvious way around that would be to say that there are two different Central Citys located in two completely different states, but even that seems tenuous because there ARE no two "major metropolitan" cities in the United States bearing the same name. Since Flash can easily bridge dimensional barriers between parallel universes by adjusting his own internal vibrational frequency, that would be the easier route to go for him in a inter-company crossover... but not so easy for the Green Hornet and The Spirit.
                          Well, there is Kansas City, Kansas (which Wikipedia lists as the 3rd largest city in that state) and nearby Kansas City, Missouri.
                          If they did a crossover between the Flash and the Spirit, and both Central Cities are located on the same Earth, they could be cities in neighboring states separated by a river or something.
                          Also, there's Portland, Oregon and Portland, Maine . . . and do you know how many states have a town or city named "Brooklyn" (even if they aren't all "major metropolitan" cities)?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MajorHoy View Post
                            Well, there is Kansas City, Kansas (which Wikipedia lists as the 3rd largest city in that state) and nearby Kansas City, Missouri.
                            If they did a crossover between the Flash and the Spirit, and both Central Cities are located on the same Earth, they could be cities in neighboring states separated by a river or something.
                            Also, there's Portland, Oregon and Portland, Maine . . . and do you know how many states have a town or city named "Brooklyn" (even if they aren't all "major metropolitan" cities)?
                            I guess it would depend on your opinion of whether Kansas City and Portland (either of them) were "major metropolitan" cities like New York City or Chicago. The fictional hometowns of resident heroes are almost always "major metropolitan" cities, because it's assumed a certain level of population density (and commerce, wealth, exchange of money) is necessary to support a high crime rate, keeping the hero occupied and justifying his existence.

                            There are a lot of cities named Springfield, but probably not many, if any, of them require superheroic intervention in fighting crime.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                              I guess it would depend on your opinion of whether Kansas City and Portland (either of them) were "major metropolitan" cities like New York City or Chicago. The fictional hometowns of resident heroes are almost always "major metropolitan" cities, because it's assumed a certain level of population density (and commerce, wealth, exchange of money) is necessary to support a high crime rate, keeping the hero occupied and justifying his existence.
                              But how many people does a city need?
                              For 2016, it looks like New York City is listed with a population of 8.538 million people; Los Angeles with 3.976 million; and Chicago with 2.705 million.

                              Going back to 1940, we had:
                              New York City = 7,454,995
                              Chicago, IL = 3,396,808
                              Philadelphia, PA = 1,931,334
                              Los Angeles, CA = 1,504,277
                              Cleveland, OH = 878,336
                              Baltimore, MD = 859,100
                              St. Louis, MO = 816,048
                              Boston, MA = 770,816
                              Pittsburgh, PA 671,659
                              https://www.census.gov/history/www/t...ast_facts.html

                              Oh, and for Washington, DC back in 1940 = 663,091 people.
                              (https://www.census.gov/population/ww...0027/tab17.txt)

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