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  • Who Else Is Using These Characters?

    I see the characters from Project Superpowers pop up here and there and would like to list other options for material while Dynamite is doing...whatever it is they're doing.

    Inspired by Barry Reese mentioning a review of one of his recent books which includes Black Terror. I can't seem to post the image here so give 'er a click below.

    https://barryreese.net/2017/03/11/th...of-volume-six/

  • #2
    Green Lama books from Moonstone:

    http://moonstonebooks.com/shop/category.aspx?catid=168

    Comment


    • #3
      Those are "new pulp" fiction novels though, not comics. There was a book published about 10 years ago by Wild Cat Books that was half-reprint of Golden Age public domain Black Terror and Daredevil stories, and half-new pulp fiction. Can't recall who the writers were right now on the new fiction stories, but Barry Reese may have been one of them. Airship 27 published 3 issues of ALL-STAR PULP COMICS, that had a mixture of classic pulp heroes and 'new pulp' original characters, and those were 100% comics.
      DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by positronic View Post
        Those are "new pulp" fiction novels though, not comics. There was a book published about 10 years ago by Wild Cat Books that was half-reprint of Golden Age public domain Black Terror and Daredevil stories, and half-new pulp fiction. Can't recall who the writers were right now on the new fiction stories, but Barry Reese may have been one of them. Airship 27 published 3 issues of ALL-STAR PULP COMICS, that had a mixture of classic pulp heroes and 'new pulp' original characters, and those were 100% comics.
        Not familiar about what Wild Cat did but I have the three Airship 27 books (by way of Redbud Studios) to which you refer. They're OK and your description is certainly accurate, but there's very little of the Project Superpowers cast in there, as I recall. Green Lama is on one cover and has an 8 (?) page story in that book. I think that's it.

        We can certainly expand this to be a general pulp / public domain thread, if people want that. I didn't intend for it to be comic-specific, either. Just more-or-less current usage of the characters. That's why I didn't go into Terra Obscura (mentioned here a few times already anyway) or Malibu's Protectors book, since those are several years old.

        I thought AC Comics was doing something with them too recently but all I'm coming across is reprints.

        Comment


        • #5
          As we're discussing this, I'm reminded that Gallant Comics has six issues of its John Aman Amazing Man book available for free download on IndyPlanet.

          http://www.indyplanet.us/gallant-comics/

          Partial solicitation to the final issue:

          The epic, double-sized conclusion to the six part story “How Sharper Than a Dragon's Tooth”. John Aman is caught in a trap set by Cadmus, the megalomaniac formerly known as Horace Googer. Unable to control his ethereal Green Mist form, Aman is helpless and at the mercy of Cadmus. The heroes of the X-Bureau – Music Master, Blue Beetle, Miss Masque and more– have come to his aid, but does Aman's paramour Zoe Henderson hold the key to saving him?
          By Barry Gregory and Steven Butler. Fun books.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
            As we're discussing this, I'm reminded that Gallant Comics has six issues of its John Aman Amazing Man book available for free download on IndyPlanet.

            http://www.indyplanet.us/gallant-comics/

            Partial solicitation to the final issue:

            By Barry Gregory and Steven Butler. Fun books.
            John Aman was appearing for a little while in titles written by Ed Brubaker and Matt Fraction (IRON FIST, SECRET AVENGERS, DEFENDERS) under the name Prince of Orphans, but it was the same Golden Age character.

            I'm sorry that Airship 27 chose IndyPlanet as their digital comic/print-on-demand partner. I once tried ordering a couple of print-on-demand titles from them and they dragged their feet on filling the order for so long that after a few email inquiries I wound up cancelling the order after about 2 months had passed. They didn't seem very concerned about getting my books out to me (the first email exchange assured me I'd have them soon, but that never happened), and as a result I decided never to deal with them again. I guess I could just get the straight digital version and I doubt there would be any issues with purchasing and downloading copies, but I felt badly burned by that whole experience and the lack of concern that they had for me as a customer. I think I saw ALL-STAR PULP #3 on Amazon for sale as digital and POD, but they don't have the first 2 issues, or maybe it was that they had #3 as POD but #2 as digital-only and #1 not-at-all, I can't remember now. I wish they'd make it available somewhere else as POD.
            Last edited by positronic; 03-13-2017, 04:08 AM.
            DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

            Comment


            • #7
              Jeff Deischer (and his self-publishing operation Westerntainment) has a whole series of books, his own "Auric Universe" that basically does the same thing as PSP, taking the public domain comics characters as a starting point, modifying them according to his own inclinations to make them unique to his universe, and continuing the stories from the Golden Age. The Golden Age focuses on the superheroes of the Standard/Better/Nedor publications, Mystico looks at the Auric Universe's mystic heroes, while Dark of the Moon shines the spotlight on the AU's fringe characters such as Judy of the Jungle. Future Tense (Vol. X) focuses on Major Future, the Auric Universe's version of Captain Future, in a tale that spans the years 1946-2430. Bad Moon Rising (Vol. XI) stars Major Wonder, the Auric Universe's adaptation of Wonderman's series from MYSTERY and WONDER, and contains six independent but interrelated short stories that covers the year 1947, and runs the gamut from straight superhero to horror to Sci Fi. Deischer isn't writing the books in chronological order. I haven't read them, but reviews seem mostly positive.

              The Auric Universe: (Golden Age)
              I. THE GOLDEN AGE
              II . MYSTICO
              III. DARK OF THE MOON
              IV. The Golden Age Vol. IV

              X. FUTURE TENSE
              XI. BAD MOON RISING

              Deischer has a second universe called the "Argentverse" of his own original superheroes. Argent is based on Silver Age superheroes. Night of the Owl stars the heroes of the Golden Age, the Three Musketeers, as they probe into a series of brutal murders by the mysterious Owl. The Superlatives is a group of global explorers who gain superhuman abilities as the result of their adventures, and in this novel, they travel around the globe, encountering the superhumans (both good and bad) of a number of nations. Strange Days features the Argentverse's weird heroes, outcasts who are deformed as a result of their superhuman abilities, and regarded with suspicion and fear by society. Modern Times is a collection set in the 2000s, with adult content - stories that push the boundaries of superhero prose fiction. Mystery Men is a return to Jeff's pulp roots, as three interconnected short stories showcase the quasi-pulp heroes of the Argentverse. All of these books are standalones, featuring different sets of protagonists, so can literally be read in any order.

              The Argentverse: (Silver Age)
              ARGENT
              NIGHT OF THE OWL
              THE SUPERLATIVES
              STRANGE DAYS
              MODERN TIMES
              MYSTERY MEN

              Finally there's another universe published through Westerntainment, written by R. A. Jones (who wrote THE PROTECTORS for Malibu Comics from 1992-94) and based on those same Centaur comics heroes, but it's not adapted from or a sequel/prequel to those comics, it's an all-new novel taking place in the 1940s called THE STEEL RING. This has been followed up by a second volume in the series called THE TWILIGHT WAR. These are all available on Amazon as digital or POD. More info, cover images, etc. at Westerntainment's blog.
              Last edited by positronic; 03-13-2017, 07:30 AM.
              DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by positronic View Post
                John Aman was appearing for a little while in titles written by Ed Brubaker and Matt Fraction (IRON FIST, SECRET AVENGERS, DEFENDERS) under the name Prince of Orphans, but it was the same Golden Age character.

                I'm sorry that Airship 27 chose IndyPlanet as their digital comic/print-on-demand partner. I once tried ordering a couple of print-on-demand titles from them and they dragged their feet on filling the order for so long that after a few email inquiries I wound up cancelling the order after about 2 months had passed. They didn't seem very concerned about getting my books out to me (the first email exchange assured me I'd have them soon, but that never happened), and as a result I decided never to deal with them again. I guess I could just get the straight digital version and I doubt there would be any issues with purchasing and downloading copies, but I felt badly burned by that whole experience and the lack of concern that they had for me as a customer. I think I saw ALL-STAR PULP #3 on Amazon for sale as digital and POD, but they don't have the first 2 issues, or maybe it was that they had #3 as POD but #2 as digital-only and #1 not-at-all, I can't remember now. I wish they'd make it available somewhere else as POD.
                I detest Indyplanet. For a good couple of years, I was trying to point out to them that their ordering system was not accepting Canadian postal codes and didn't get a response. Suddenly, one day, it was fixed. But getting orders out does take a long time regardless. And their search function sucks ass.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Awesome info, 'tronic. I'd heard of Steel Ring but not the other stuff, I don't think. Pretty much the type of thing I'd hoped this thread would yield.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Let's not forget the wonderful Terra Osscura from more than a few years back. Just ordered the TPB of both series.
                    Always remember, Murphy was an optimist
                    Munchkin 1, 2, 4, 7 Super Munchkin 1&2, Munchkin Bites 1&2, Munchkin Fu, Star Munchkin Deluxe and Star 2
                    http://ghornet.deviantart.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've seen very little mention of this in all the discussion here regarding the PSP public domain heroes, but Erik Larsen of Image Comics is a big fan of Golden Age comics. Larsen spearheaded something called THE NEXT ISSUE PROJECT, which took as its concept the idea of producing "next issues" of various discontinued public domain Golden Age titles. Originally conceived as being more expansive, unfortunately TNIP only produced three such issues between February 2008 and October 2011: FANTASTIC COMICS #24 (TNIP #1), SILVER STREAK COMICS #24 (TNIP #2), and CRACK COMICS #63 (TNIP #3).

                      On the other hand, a story in SAVAGE DRAGON #141 guest-starred a number of resurrected public domain Golden Age characters (most of whom were largely unaltered for the story), and Daredevil stuck around to become a semi-regular supporting character beginning in issue #148. He appeared off and on in a continuing subplot, and in supporting cast appearances until issue #188. Unlike Dynamite, AC Comics, or other publishers, Erik Larsen apparently never considered the idea that his version of Daredevil would be popular enough to spin off into his own comic, so he remained just Daredevil, and was never renamed or changed in any substantial way. Daredevil finally had his big showdown with his archenemy The Claw in issue #188. The Little Wise Guys returned too, although they experienced a lot of changes from their first SD appearance through their last.

                      Unfortunately, uploading images to this site is a pain, so I'll just provide some links to the most relevant covers of SAVAGE DRAGON.

                      SAVAGE DRAGON #141
                      SAVAGE DRAGON #161
                      SAVAGE DRAGON #188

                      Regarding the book mentioned earlier on this thread reprinting Golden Age Black Terror and Daredevil stories along with new prose fiction stories of the same characters, it's mentioned on Daredevil's Wikipedia entry. I purchased a copy a few years ago, and even then it was difficult to find, with Wild Cat Books having since gone out of business. Too bad, as they had published some interesting stuff for a few short years.

                      Daredevil also appears in Legends of the Golden Age (ISBN 0982087292), an anthology featuring prose tales of Daredevil and the Black Terror. Barry Reese contributed one of the stories in this anthology, which was released in January 2009 by Wild Cat Books.
                      Last edited by positronic; 03-16-2017, 07:29 AM.
                      DE pull list: Will Eisner's The Spirit: The Corpse Makers, ERB's The Greatest Adventure, Green Hornet '66 Meets The Spirit, PSP: Herokillers, KISS/Vampirella, Mighty Mouse

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I remember seeing Davedevil in those Savage Dragon issues but they totally slipped my mind here. To be honest, I detest Erik Larsen's art. But those books certainly belong here.

                        And for kicks, I want to share this blog post from a guy who makes some pretty high quality figures of public domain / indie / pulp characters including Black Terror, Daredevil and The Shadow. You guys might want to check that out.

                        http://www.gofigurenews.com/single-p...-Welcomes-Jase

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
                          I remember seeing Davedevil in those Savage Dragon issues but they totally slipped my mind here. To be honest, I detest Erik Larsen's art. But those books certainly belong here.

                          And for kicks, I want to share this blog post from a guy who makes some pretty high quality figures of public domain / indie / pulp characters including Black Terror, Daredevil and The Shadow. You guys might want to check that out.

                          http://www.gofigurenews.com/single-p...-Welcomes-Jase
                          That was weird. I'm a huge fan of Captain Action and truly bummed out that the revival line of a few years back fizzled. Jase Marshall's figures are impressive. I'm sure he's a nice guy and all that, but I was interested in learning more about the figures in the photos and his custom fabrication techniques, and all he did was run down his personal data. I guess he really must not need to look for more work either, because not so much as a line on how to get in touch with him or what sort of prices he charges. Didn't recognize the two characters after The Shadow (a wild guess at the first one might be Ron Fortier's Brother Bones). Mr. Monster was cool, but he took the easy route and swiped the goggles from somewhere. The lenses needed to be smaller and perfect round circles (similar to Lobster Johnson, that way). Looks like he got Blue Beetle's face mask straight from a CA Phantom outfit (although you can't say the character's design inspiration isn't a little too obvious). Duke Tojo (Golgo 13) is a great character -- I'm surprised he didn't have a photo of a custom figure for him.
                          Last edited by pulphero; 03-18-2017, 01:27 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by pulphero View Post
                            That was weird. I'm a huge fan of Captain Action and truly bummed out that the revival line of a few years back fizzled. Jase Marshall's figures are impressive. I'm sure he's a nice guy and all that, but I was interested in learning more about the figures in the photos and his custom fabrication techniques, and all he did was run down his personal data. I guess he really must not need to look for more work either, because not so much as a line on how to get in touch with him or what sort of prices he charges. Didn't recognize the two characters after The Shadow (a wild guess at the first one might be Ron Fortier's Brother Bones). Mr. Monster was cool, but he took the easy route and swiped the goggles from somewhere. The lenses needed to be smaller and perfect round circles (similar to Lobster Johnson, that way). Looks like he got Blue Beetle's face mask straight from a CA Phantom outfit (although you can't say the character's design inspiration isn't a little too obvious). Duke Tojo (Golgo 13) is a great character -- I'm surprised he didn't have a photo of a custom figure for him.
                            Yeah, that whole thing was a little strange. I guess he just joining the team so he was introducing himself but a heading after the pictures wouldn't have killed anyone. I think you're right about Brother Bones and since he's not completely devoted to detail, my only other guess for the second figurine is Sandman, but I'm not convinced about that. I thought it might be The Stalker from Last Sentry because I'd just recently happened across that character, but he doesn't wear a suit.

                            http://www.lastsentrycomics.com/index.html

                            Seemed pretty obscure but then so is Brother Bones.

                            I'd meant to share the Mr. Monster image with someone I know online who's a huge fan of that characters but I couldn't save the image. Okay, I know some people don't want their work copied, fair enough. But then I couldn't directly share it on Twitter, either. They don't have a share function. And they don't have a Twitter account of their own from which to retweet. So not a great way to promote yourself.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Captain Canuck View Post
                              I remember seeing Daredevil in those Savage Dragon issues but they totally slipped my mind here. To be honest, I detest Erik Larsen's art. But those books certainly belong here.
                              You know, for a long time I had a strong distaste for all of those original Image titles and creators (except Jim Lee, when he was drawing Marvel or DC characters). But I began by picking up THE NEXT ISSUE PROJECT and then began to pick up SAVAGE DRAGON with those issues with Golden Age guest-stars, and they changed my mind about Erik Larsen. He's really got a Kirby-derived storytelling dynamic going on, and I think SD is a lot more substantial in characterization and content than those other Image founder titles like Spawn, WildC.A.T.s, or Youngblood. It's in no way reader-friendly though. A little hard to find a jumping-on point there, as it's absolutely dense with its own continuity, going back to 1993. The series actually takes place in real time, with the current Savage Dragon being the son of the original (who is now 54 years old). And of all those Image titles going back to the beginning, only Larsen has written and drawn every single issue of his own creator-owned title, which I have to respect. And he's got a genuine love and respect for those Golden Age characters and comics. Now when I see back issues of Savage Dragon in the 50-cent boxes, I pick them up.

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